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August 29

12 entries found


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Stuart & Lincoln file notice that on September 11, 1839 they will take depositions of two witnesses, in Thomas Moffett's office, for use in Orendorf et al. v. Stringfield et al.Record.



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Revised Entry

Lincoln and other members of the "Clay Club" Executive Committee write to Henry Clay, of Kentucky, and invite the prominent statesman to "visit . . . the prairie-land." The members remind Clay that he has "never visited Illinois, or at least this portion of it; and should you now yield to our request, we promise you such a reception as shall be worthy of the man on whom are now turned the fondest hopes of a great and suffering nation." Clay, September 6, 1842, declines with thanks.Abraham Lincoln to Henry Clay, 29 August 1842, CW, 1:297.

Lincoln writes bill of injunction, which his client Peter Van Bergen signs and swears before Judge Treat, in VanBergen v. Witmer et al.Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



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Lincoln & Herndon participate in eight cases before the Sangamon County Circuit Court. In Jackson v. Brown, while representing the defendant they file a demurrer to the plaintiff's declaration. After hearing both sides argue over the demurrer, the court takes the issue under advisement. In Fithian v. Mobley et al., Lincoln & Herndon dismiss their client's bill to foreclose mortgage against one defendant. Representing the other two defendants, John T. Stuart consents to an agreement in which the court orders his clients to pay Fithian a total of $3,175.20, principal and interest on two mortgages, by March 1, 1850, on penalty of foreclosure. Lincoln writes the court decree to foreclose. Lincoln also writes and signs a joinder to the defendants' plea in Coon v. Lloyd et al. Motions are entered in remaining cases. Record; Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



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Jury brings in true bill in People v. Smith on charge of obstructing road. Lincoln & Herndon represent defendant. In Luckett v. Garvey jury finds defendant guilty of trespass and awards Lincoln & Herndon's client damages of $38.97. In Gillman v. Gillman, Lincoln & Herndon get rule on defendant to answer by tomorrow. Record.



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Lincoln is impatient with Martin for not sending him necessary records in Sangamon & Alton cases. "You had distinctly promised me that you would send them up whenever I should want them," he complains. "Now, send them at once, if you shall not have done so already." Abraham Lincoln to William Martin, 29 August 1851, CW, 2:110.

Lincoln & Herndon's only case in court is dismissed at opponent's cost. Record.



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First sale of lots takes place in new town. Ninety are sold at prices ranging from $40 to $150. [According to tradition Lincoln is present. At noon he purchases two watermelons and carries one under each arm to public square. There he invites Latham, Hickox, and Gillette, proprietors, to join him, saying, "Now we'll christen the new town."] Lawrence B. Stringer, ed., History of Logan County, 2 vols. (Chicago: Pioneer Publishing Co., 1911), 1:568-69.



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"Lincoln arrived here on Sunday evening, en route for Tremont." Register, 4 September 1858.



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Still concerned about New York "Herald" story, Lincoln writes to Fogg: "You have done precisely right in that matter with the Herald. Do nothing further about it. Although it wrongs me, and annoys me some, I prefer letting it run its course, to getting into the papers over my own name." As to Republican prospects, "the whole field appears reasonably well." Abraham Lincoln to George G. Fogg, 29 August 1860, CW, 4:102.



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"Col. R. [Richard] D. Goodwin of New York," authorized to raise President's Life Guard Regiment, fails to recruit men and so informs Lincoln. Washington Star, 30 August 1861.

President recognizes Robert Barth as vice consul of Prussia at St. Louis. N.Y. Tribune, 30 August 1861.

[Mrs. Lincoln stays with Mrs. W. H. Seward in Auburn, N.Y. N.Y. Tribune, 30 August 1861.

John Hay, assistant secretary to President, leaves for Illinois to overcome illness. Washington Star, 29 August 1861.

For "altering collar" Lincoln's account is charged $1.00. Lutz Account Book.

In Niagara Falls, Mrs. Lincoln purchases from Mrs. James Davy, "2 sets of Mat & Cushion $30.00," and "1 Worked Table Cloth $25.00." DNA—RG 217 General Accounting Office 141-686.]



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President and cabinet discuss Chiriqui colonization project and decide to abandon it. Philadelphia News, 2 September 1862.

Lincoln maintains close contact with military developments in vicinity of Manassas, Va. Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 29 August 1862, CW, 5:398-99; Abraham Lincoln to Herman Haupt, 29 August 1862, CW, 5:399; Abraham Lincoln to George B. McClellan, 29 August 1862, CW, 5:399.

Mrs. Lincoln visits soldiers in Odd Fellows' Hall Hospital. Washington Star, 29 August 1862.



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Revised Entry

President at Treasury Dept. in afternoon consults with Sec. Chase on results of arming Negro troops. Official Records—Armies 532.

Sends copy of his August 26, 1863 Conkling letter to Union State Committee of New York. Abraham Lincoln to Ben Field, 29 August 1863, CW, 6:420; Abraham Lincoln to Ben Field, 29 August 1863, CW, 6:420.

President Lincoln writes to his wife, Mary, who is in Manchester, New Hampshire. He relays war news, particularly regarding the Charleston, South Carolina area. Lincoln writes, "All quite well. Fort-Sumpter is certainly battered down, and utterly useless to the enemy, and it is believed here, but not entirely certain, that both Sumpter and Fort-Wagner, are occupied by our forces. It is also certain that Gen. [Quincy Adams] Gilmore [Gillmore] has thrown some shot into the City of Charleston." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 29 August 1863, CW, 6:421.



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President interviews Col. Worthington, who asks permission to visit Gen. Grant. Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 29 August 1864, CW, 7:523-24.

Sec. Welles confers with President about petition from Boston relative to trial of Smith brothers. For political reasons they decide to transfer trial to Boston before civil tribunal. Welles, Diary; Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 28 August 1864, CW, 7:522-23.

President interviews Hon. Paul C. Brinck, of New Jersey, who thinks troop quotas are too heavy on his township.

[John Nicolay arrives in New York at noon on political mission for President involving changes in customhouse officials. Nicolay to Lincoln, 29 August 1864, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.]