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July 25

19 entries found


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Today's meeting is scheduled at Allenton, a mile and a half north of modern Taylorville.Sangamo Journal, 16 July 1836.



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Revised Entry

At 2 p.m., Lincoln, several other state legislators, and "other distinguished men" dine at George W. Spotswood's Rural Hotel. A group of citizens organized the meal to honor the legislators "for a faithful performance of their official duties." In February, the General Assembly voted to relocate the state capitol from Vandalia to Springfield. Lincoln toasts, "All our friends.—They are too numerous to be now named individually, while there is no one of them who is not too dear to be forgotten or neglected."A Toast Volunteered at a Public Dinner at Springfield, Illinois, 25 July 1837, CW, 1:87; Sangamo Journal (Springfield, IL), 29 July 1837, 2:1.



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Lincoln is one of 14 signers of petition to Gov. Duncan to appoint John Dixon to vacancy on Board of Commissioners of Public Works to succeed J. A. Stephenson, resigned.Original owned by George C. Dixon, Springfield, Ill.



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Whigs hold Log Cabin and Hard Cider rally, with visiting delegations. Lincoln was in Carlinville this summer, possibly at this time.Missouri Republican, 10 July 1840.



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Sangamon Circuit Court opens six-day term. Logan & Lincoln have one case dismissed and two continued. Court grants Lincoln's petition for partition of lands in Merriman et al. v. Merriman et al. On April 2, 1842 Lincoln got judgment for $1,221.87 against John Lockridge. Today in Foster v. Lockridge & Bridges defendant is made party to judgment against Lockridge.Record.

In Merriman et al. v. Merriman et al. he writes court order and makes copy attested by James H. Matheny, clerk.Photocopy.



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Leave is granted Logan & Lincoln to amend bill in Dillon v. Lake, chancery case. Defendant defaults in Thompson v. Stapelford; complainant's bill is taken as confessed for $463.73. Logan & Lincoln appear for complainant and Welles for defendant. Sackett v. Miller and Miller is continued.Record.



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Lincoln is scheduled to speak at seven o'clock in evening.Tazewell Whig, 18 July 1846.



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Lincoln is present in House. Conference committee reports Indian appropriations bill. Report is accepted and bill passed.Globe.



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Lincoln and Benjamin S. Edwards, representing John B. Watson, write and file a declaration in Watson v. Sangamon & Morgan Railroad, a case before the Sangamon County Circuit Court to collect payment for cross ties Watson delivered to the railroad. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



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Revised Entry

Lincoln is in Chicago, where he delivers a eulogy for President Zachary Taylor, who died on July 9. Lincoln emphasizes Taylor's military career and remarks, "Gen. Taylor's battles were not distinguished for brilliant military manoeuvers; but in all, he seems rather to have conquered by the exercise of a sober and steady judgment, coupled with a dogged incapacity to understand that defeat was possible. . . . In Gen. Taylor's general public relation to his country, what will strongly impress a close observer, was his unostentatious, self-sacrificing, long enduring devotion to his duty." Eulogy on Zachary Taylor, 25 July 1850, CW, 2:83-90.



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Lincoln receives letter from William Martin on telegram mystery. Abraham Lincoln to William Martin, 26 July 1851, CW, 2:107.

Mrs. Lincoln buys $1.85 "mdse" from John Williams & Co. Pratt, Personal Finances, 145.



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Lincoln addresses "monster meeting." Chicago Democrat, 2 August 1856.



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Lincoln catches up on his correspondence. To Gillespie he writes encouragement: "I do hope you are worse scared than hurt, though you ought to know best. We must not lose that district." "I write this mostly because I learn we are in great danger in Madison," he writes Koerner. "It is said half the Americans are going for Douglas; and that slam will ruin us if not counteracted." He writes George W. Woods of Macoupin County that he cannot make appointment for speech until debates are scheduled. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Gillespie, 25 July 1858, CW, 2:523-24; Abraham Lincoln to Gustave P. Koerner, 25 July 1858, CW, 2:524; Abraham Lincoln to George W. Woods, 25 July 1858, CW, 2:524.



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Robert buys 22 pounds of sugar at Smith's. Pratt, Personal Finances, 158.



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Springfield Democrats demonstrate with procession. Democrats claim Lincoln watched parade from state house dome. Republicans deny it, and for weeks controversy, reminiscent of Lincoln's Mexican War resolutions, goes on as to 'spot' from which he viewed parade. Register, Illinois State Journal, 26 July 1860 ff.



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Lincoln interviews Sen. Browning (Ill.) and Lt. George P. Ihrie (resigned) about paymaster appointment. Browning, Diary.

Receives Prof. Lowe. Bruce, Tools of War, 87.

Sends communications to House of Representatives regarding foreign correspondence on subjects of insurrection in U.S. and maritime rights. Abraham Lincoln to the House of Representatives, 25 July 1861, CW, 4:459; Abraham Lincoln to the House of Representatives, 25 July 1861, CW, 4:459-60.



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Revised Entry

President at War Dept. in morning discusses opening of Mississippi River with Sec. Stanton. Sec. Chase drops in during meeting. Stanton recommends sending Gen. Ormsby M. Mitchel to clear the river. Warden, Chase, 441.

President proclaims "An act to suppress insurrection . . .," approved July 17, 1862. National Intelligencer, 26 July 1862; Proclamation of the Act to Suppres Insurrection, 25 July 1862, CW, 5:341-42.

President Lincoln addresses the approximately twenty-five people who line up outside of his office. Lincoln advises, "You all want to see me on business; it is a matter of no importance to me whether I spend my time with half a dozen or with the whole of you, but it is of importance to you. Therefore, when you come in, please don't stay long." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 25 July 1862, 2:1.

President Lincoln orders the "Executive Mansion and the several Executive Departments, excepting those of War and the Navy, be immediately placed in mourning, and all business be suspended during to morrow." Lincoln issues the order as "a mark of respect for" former President Martin Van Buren, who died on July 24, at Kinderhook, New York. Order for Observance of Death of Martin Van Buren, 25 July 1862, CW, 5:340-41; Daily National Intelligencer (Washington, DC), 26 July 1862, 3:3.

Discusses with Mitchel plans for opening Mississippi. Warden, Chase, 441.

In evening at Soldiers' Home has conversation with Sen. Browning (Ill.) on public affairs. Browning, Diary.



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At night John Hay accompanies President to Soldiers' Home. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Lincoln explains to Gov. Parker (N.J.) that it would breed trouble to "have a special stipulation with the Governor of any one State" regarding draft quotas. "As it stands, the best I can say is, that every volunteer you will present us within thirty days from this date . . . shall be, pro-tanto—an abatement of your quota of the draft." Abraham Lincoln to Joel Parker, 25 July 1863, CW, 6:347-48.

Orders Sec. Welles to: 1. cease "using any neutral port, to watch neutral vessels, and then to dart out and seize them on their departure"; 2. cease detaining "the crew of a captured neutral vessel . . . on board such vessel, as prisoners of war." Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 25 July 1863, CW, 6:348-50.



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President confers with Gen. Meigs relative to destroying fords across Potomac from Washington to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., by means of dams. Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

T. Shaffer interviews President regarding difficulty of getting cotton out of Military Division of West Mississippi. Abraham Lincoln to Edward R. S. Canby, 25 July 1864, CW, 7:457.

President writes Abram Wakeman, post-master at New York, that men from South recently at Niagara Falls, N.Y., were empowered to assist in selecting candidate and platform for Chicago convention. Next presidential contest will "be no other than a contest between a Union and a Disunion candidate." Abraham Lincoln to Abram Wakeman, 25 July 1864, CW, 7:461.

Thanks Loyal Ladies of Trenton for cane made from arch erected in 1789 on spot where Cornwallis was repulsed. [Presented on June 16, 1864 at Sanitary Fair in Philadelphia.] Abraham Lincoln to the Loyal Ladies of Trenton, New Jersey, 25 July 1864, CW, 7:458.

Writes William O. Snider, probably of Philadelphia: "The cane you did me the honor to present throough [sic] Gov. Curtin was duly placed in my hand by him. Please accept my thanks; and at the same time, pardon me for not having sooner found time to tender them." Abraham Lincoln to William O. Snider, 25 July 1864, CW, 7:460.