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Thursday, January 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Gen. Burnside consults with President and restates part of conversation in letter: "Doubtless this difference of opinion between my general officers and myself results from a lack of confidence in me. . . . It is my belief that I ought to retire to private life." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 1 January 1863, CW, 6:31-33.

New Year's Day reception at White House begins at 10 a.m. with reception of foreign ministers, followed by the general public at noon until 2 p.m. The President "looked well---was never nearer gay or buoyant." Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 2 January 1863, 2:3; Washington Chronicle, 2 January 1863; Notes, 1 January 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC..

Army officers assemble at War Department and attend reception in body. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles exchanges greetings with President and colleagues at Executive Mansion. Welles, Diary.

At noon Secretary of State William H. Seward and Assistant Secretary of State Frederick W. Seward take official copy of Emancipation Proclamation to room in White House where cabinet meets. Shortly afterward President signs it. Frederick W. Seward, Reminiscences of a War-Time Statesman and Diplomat, 1830-1915. By Frederick W. Seward, Assistant Secretary of State during the Administrations of Lincoln, Johnson, and Hayes (New York: Putnam, 1916), 227.

After White House reception Lincoln goes to telegraph office in War Department, settles at Major Thomas T. Eckert's desk, puts feet on nearby table, and relaxes in conversation with General Henry W. Halleck and Assistant Secretary Fox. Bates, Telegraph Office, 143.

Prepares instructions for General Halleck to visit Burnside's headquarters and pass judgment on plan to move army across Rappahannock, then withdraws instructions because considered harsh by Halleck. Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 1 January 1863, CW, 6:31-33.

Directs Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton to investigate "piteous appeal . . . made . . . by an old lady" who had been ordered to evacuate her boarding house. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 1 January 1863, CW, 6:33.

Friday, January 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

George P. Strong, resident of St. Louis, delivers to President letter from Gen. Curtis regarding order to exile Rev. McPheeters. Abraham Lincoln to Samuel R. Curtis, 2 January 1863, CW, 6:33-34.

Gen. Butler at White House in evening for conference. Washington Chronicle, 3 January 1863.

Says President asks him to go to Mississippi and organize Negro troops. Benjamin F. Butler, Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences . . . Butler's Book (Boston: A. M. Thayer, 1892), 549-50.

President submits to Congress expediency of appointing an acting head of government department. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 2 January 1863, CW, 6:34-35.

Saturday, January 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sen. Browning (Ill.) confers with President about Confederates attacking Fortress Monroe, Va. Browning, Diary.

Prof. Benjamin N. Martin, "University of the City of New York," calls on Lincoln regarding restoration of Gen. Benham's commission. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 3 January 1863, CW, 6:35.

Deputation of thirty Jews, including a distinguished Rabbi, meet with the President regarding General Ulysses S. Grant's Order No. 11 banishing Jews from his department. Upon hearing the facts, Lincoln rescinds the order. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 5 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

President sends to Senate convention for adjustment of claims between U.S. and Ecuador. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 3 January 1863, CW, 6:35-36.

Receives word that U.S.S. "Monitor" has foundered in gale off Cape Hatteras, N.C. Nicolay to Bates, 4 January 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Committee composed of Giles F. Filley, merchant, and James E. Yeatman, banker, of St. Louis presents memorial of citizens asking relief for Reverend McPheeters. Abraham Lincoln to Samuel R. Curtis, 2 January 1863, CW, 6:33-34.

Lincoln responds to appeal: "Let this woman have her boy out of Old Capitol Prison." Endorsement, 3 January 1863, CW, 6:35.

Sunday, January 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cesar J. Kaskel, sponsored by Cong. John A. Gurley (Ohio), interviews Lincoln regarding order issued by Gen. Grant expelling Jews from Military Department of Tennessee. Bertram W. Korn, American Jewry and the Civil War (Philadelphia, PA: Jewish Publication Society of America, 1951), 125.

James M. Winchell, newspaper correspondent, interviews President on Battle of Stone's River. J. M. Winchell, "Three Interviews with President Lincoln," Galaxy 16 (July 1873):33-34.

Lincoln attends New York Avenue Presbyterian Church and drives Sen. Browning (Ill.) home. Browning, Diary.

Lincoln directs Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles to "hear and consider" the requests of "refugees" from Virginia who seek to "remove their families and property to protection within the Union lines, by means of our armed gunboats on the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay." Lincoln states that "many persons" have applied for "permission" to relocate, and he asks Welles to determine the "proper" way to assist them. Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 4 January 1863, CW, 6:36.

Monday, January 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President transmits to House of Representatives report regarding interference of U.S. minister to Mexico in favor of French. Abraham Lincoln to the House of Representatives, 5 January 1863, CW, 6:38-39.

Congratulates Gen. William S. Rosecrans on victory in Battle of Murfreesboro (Stone's River): "God bless you, and all with you!" Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 5 January 186[3], CW, 6:39.

Sen. Harlan (Iowa) visits President and delivers communication from Religious Society of Friends of Prairie Grove, Ark. Abraham Lincoln to Caleb Russell and Sallie A. Fenton, 5 January 1863, CW, 6:39-40.

Missouri congressman lay before President request that practice of assessments be discontinued. Abraham Lincoln to Samuel R. Curtis, 5 January 1863, CW, 6:36-38.

Lincoln receives December salary warrant for $2,022.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.

Borrows from Library of Congress: "Atlantic [magazine], Jan.-June 1861." Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 114, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Tuesday, January 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Col. Daniel Ullmann and Capt. Alban B. Botsford, both of 78th New York Infantry, confer with President in matter of organizing brigade of Negro troops in Louisiana. Memorandum Concerning Alban B. Botsford, 6 January 1863, CW, 6:41.

Lincoln directs Sec. Seward not to countersign contract between U.S. government and B. Kock for colonizing 5,000 Negroes on Ile à Vache. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 6 January 1863, CW, 6:41-42.

Interviews Strange N. Palmer, father of Robert M. Palmer, late minister to Argentine, and Simon Cameron regarding commission in Marine Corps for Strange J. Palmer. Palmer to Lincoln, 27 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

[Irwin deposits $450 in Springfield Marine Bank, payments on principal and interest on Springfield City Bond. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165.]

Lincoln writes a second letter to Mrs. Abraham (Jane) Hoge, of Chicago, Illinois, regarding her request to obtain a "staff officer" appointment for her son. Previously, Lincoln outlined the "conditions" that would allow him to proceed with the appointment. He reiterates, "A Major-General must be found who has not already the full complement of Staff-officers...and who is willing to take your son as one of them. Without these I should violate both law, and an indispensable courtesy, to thrust your son, or any one else, upon any Major General's staff." Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Abraham H. Hoge, 25 November 1862, CW, 5:512; Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Abraham H. Hoge, 6 January 1863, CW, 6:40-41.

Wednesday, January 7, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President discusses with former Cong. Green Adams (Ky.) proposition to raise and arm special force in Kentucky. Abraham Lincoln to Green Adams, 7 January 1863, CW, 6:42.

Informs B. Gratz Brown, antisecessionist and Democratic candidate in senatorial election in Missouri: "The Administration takes no part between it's friends in Mo." Abraham Lincoln to B. Gratz Brown, 7 January 1863, CW, 6:42-43.

Sends to the Senate nominations for thirty civilian and diplomatic appointments. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 9 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:5.

Col. Walter B. Scates, former chief justice of Illinois Supreme Court, hands to President letter from Gen. McClernand protesting Emancipation Proclamation as mitigating chances of negotiating peace with South. Abraham Lincoln to John A. McClernand, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:48-49.

Sen. Sumner (Mass.) again interviews President about returning Gen. Butler to New Orleans. Benjamin F. Butler, Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences . . . Butler's Book (Boston: A. M. Thayer, 1892), 552.

Thursday, January 8, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln replies to Gen. McClernand that Emancipation Proclamation has been issued and "broken eggs can not be mended." Abraham Lincoln to John A. McClernand, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:48-49.

Sends felicitations to José M. Acha on reelection to presidency of Republic of Bolivia. Abraham Lincoln to José M. Acha, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:45.

Proclaims treaty of peace, friendship, commerce, and navigation with Republic of Bolivia. Washington Chronicle, 30 April 1863.

Senate confirms nomination of John P. Usher to be secretary of interior. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 9 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:1; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 9 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:2.

[Irwin withdraws $102 from Springfield Marine Bank, to pay taxes. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]

Mrs. Fox at White House for social visit with Mrs. Lincoln. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President orders that attorney general be charged with direction of all proceedings under Act of August 6, 1861, as fully in all respects as under Act of July 17, 1862. Order to Edward Bates, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:45-46.

Writes Gen. Burnside: "I deplore the want of concurrence with you, in opinion by your general officers, but I do not see the remedy. . . . I do not yet see how I could profit by changing the command of the A.P. & if I did, I should not wish to do it by accepting the resignation of your commission." Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:46-48.

Inquires of Mil. Gov. Johnson about Capt. Charles S. Todd, 6th Kentucky Regiment, killed at Battle of Murfreesboro. Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:48.

Friday, January 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets. No announcement of transactions. Welles, Diary.

Sen. Powell (Ky.) calls on President and demands unconditional release of William S. Pryor, J. O'Hara, and Col. Thomas L. Jones (CSA), Kentuckians now on parole. Memorandum Concerning William S. Pryor, J. O'Hara, and Thomas L. Jones, 9 January 1863, CW, 6:50.

President transmits to Congress correspondence concerning international agricultural exhibition in city of Hamburg. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 9 January 1863, CW, 6:51.

In evening consults with Sens. Browning (Ill.) and Hale (N.H.) and Rear Adm. Andrew H. Foote about compensated emancipation. Browning, Diary.

Saturday, January 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President consults with Secs. Welles and Stanton on problem of employment of contrabands (Negroes from Confederacy within Union lines). Welles, Diary.

Writes Gen. Curtis at St. Louis: "I understand there is considerable trouble with the slaves in Missouri. Please do your best to keep peace on the question for two or three weeks, by which time we hope to do something here towards settling the question, in Missouri." Abraham Lincoln to Samuel R. Curtis, 10 January 1863, CW, 6:52-53.

Informs Gov. Johnson (Tenn.): "I presume the remains of Capt. Todd are in the hands of his family friends, & I wish to give no order on the subject. But I do wish your opinion of the effects of the late battles about Murfreesboro, upon the prospects of Tennessee." Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 10 January 1863, CW, 6:53.

Hosts reception with Mrs. Lincoln from 1:00 P.M. to 3:00 P.M. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 10 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

In evening attends patriotic readings delivered by James E. Murdoch, elocutionist, in Senate. Washington Chronicle, 11 January 1863.

Sunday, January 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln receives from Commissioner French request for $200 to aid families of District Volunteers. French to Lincoln, 11 January 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Asks Sen. Jacob Collamer (Vt.) to call at once if not going to church, otherwise as soon as convenient. Abraham Lincoln to Jacob Collamer, 11 January 1863, CW, 6:53-54.

Monday, January 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President and Sec. Stanton in morning conference on army affairs. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 12 January 1863, CW, 6:55.

Lincoln instructs Judge Adv. Gen. Holt to revise proceedings of courtmartial in case of Gen. Fitz John Porter, on trial in connection with failure of Gen. Pope's campaign, August 1862, and to report on other aspects of trial. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 12 January 1863, CW, 5:54.

Acknowledges receipt of resolutions of Connecticut Legislature favorable to administration forwarded by Gov. Buckingham (Conn.). Abraham Lincoln to William A. Buckingham, 12 January 1863, CW, 5:54.

Senator Charles Sumner (Mass.) calls on President at night and reads letter from George Livermore of Boston acknowledging receipt of pen used by Lincoln to sign "New Years" proclamation (Emancipation Proclamation). Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 31 January 1863; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 7 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Mrs. Lincoln borrows "Why Paul Ferroll killed his wife" from Library of Congress. [Mrs. Caroline Wigley Clive, Why Paul Ferroll killed his wife, London, 1860.] Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 114, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Tuesday, January 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet examines intercepted mail in possession of Sec. Welles. Welles, Diary.

Wednesday, January 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President informs House of Representatives that it would not be compatible with public interest to make known communications with New Granada (Colombia and Panama). Abraham Lincoln to the House of Representatives, 14 January 1863, CW, 6:56-58.

Relative to practical advantages of Emancipation Proclamation he writes General Dix at Fortress Monroe, Va.: "I therefore will thank you for your well considered opinion whether Fortress-Monroe, and York-Town, one or both, could not, in whole or in part, be garrisoned by colored troops, leaving the white forces now necessary at those places to be employed elsewhere." Abraham Lincoln to John A. Dix, 14 January 1863, CW, 6:56.

Secretary of State William H. Seward introduces George-Etienne Cartier of Canada, recently Attorney General and Premier of Canada East, to the President. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 14 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Thursday, January 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

In morning President confers with Capt. Dahlgren at Navy Yard regarding Capt. Diller's gunpowder. Extracts from Dahlgren Diary, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Endorsement Concerning Isaac R. Diller's Gundpowder, 15 January 1863, CW, 6:59.

Meets with Horace Greeley, editor of the New-York Tribune. Newspaper reports that warrant against Greeley for libel by District of Columbia Marshal Ward H. Lamon is withheld or withdrawn altogether. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 16 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:5.

Friday, January 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

Cong. Robert McKnight (Pa.) and Gen. Heintzelman interview President regarding appointment of Heintzelman's son to West Point. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln borrows "Hume's England 2d" from Library of Congress. [David Hume, The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688, Boston, 1854.] Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 114, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Saturday, January 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

In morning Lincoln discusses state of Union with Horace Greeley, then interviews Capt. James M. Rice accompanied by former Sen. O. H. Browning (Ill.), Washington attorney. Browning, Diary.

Lincoln signs a resolution that Congress passed concerning military pay. The resolution allows the treasury secretary to "make an additional issue of one hundred millions of dollars . . . for the payment of the army and navy." Lincoln seeks a "prompt discharge of all arrears of pay due to our soldiers and our sailors." He takes the opportunity to address the over-issuance of government and bank notes. Lincoln explains, "A judicious measure to prevent the deterioration of this currency, by a reasonable taxation of bank circulation or otherwise is needed." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 17 January 1863, CW, 6:60-62.

Mrs. Lincoln holds Saturday afternoon reception. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sunday, January 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President attends morning service at Foundry Methodist Episcopal Church, 14th and G Streets NW, to hear sermon of Bishop Matthew Simpson on the missionary cause. The audience collects $150 to honor the President as a "Life Director" of the American Missionary Society. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 19 January 1863, 2d ed., 3:1; Washington Chronicle, 19 January 1863.

Converses with Assoc. Justice Davis on topics in general and reconstructed cabinet in particular. Browning, Diary.

Monday, January 19, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President replies to laudatory address from workingmen of Manchester, England: "It is now a pleasant duty to acknowledge the demonstration you have given of your desire that a spirit of peace and amity towards this country may prevail in the councils of your Queen." Abraham Lincoln to the Workingmen of Manchester, England, 19 January 1863, CW, 6:63-65.

In afternoon J. E. Murdoch gives patriotic readings to select group at White House. In evening President and Mrs. Lincoln attend readings in Senate Chamber for benefit of sick and wounded soldiers. Murdoch reads "Sleeping Sentinel" by Francis De Haes Janvier. LL, No. 544; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 19 January 1863, 2d ed., 3:3, 20 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:1; Washington Chronicle, 20 January 1863.

Tuesday, January 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At cabinet meeting President asks secretaries for opinions on relative merits of five-foot gauge railroad as opposed to four-foot-one-and-a-half-inch gauge. Order Establishing Gauge of Union Pacific Railroad, 21 January 1863, CW, 6:68.

Transmits to Senate report regarding exportation of articles of contraband for use of French army in Mexico. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 20 January 1863, CW, 6:66-67.

Receives request from Gov. Yates (Ill.) for appointment of Col. William Ross as bearer of dispatches so that he may go to Europe for eye operation. Yates to Lincoln, 20 January 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Army of Potomac on march. Blizzard sweeps country. Lincoln in White House hears frozen crystals beat on windows of office. Monaghan, Diplomat, 279.

Deplores distress of people in southwest Missouri and informs Samuel T. Glover, prominent Unionist, that Congress would oppose extension of railroad to Springfield, Mo. Abraham Lincoln to Samuel T. Glover, 20 January 1863, CW, 6:66.

Wednesday, January 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President approves sentence dismissing General Fitz John Porter from service. Order Approving Sentence of Fitz-John Porter, 21 January 1863, CW, 6:67.

Establishes width of track of Pacific railroads at five feet. Order Establishing Gauge of Union Pacific Railroad, 21 January 1863, CW, 6:68.

Submits to Congress joint resolutions of corporate authorities of city of Washington urging construction of railroads concentrating upon city. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 21 January 1863, CW, 6:68-69.

Endorses letter of Gen. Halleck to Gen. Grant: "It may be proper to give you some explanation of the revocation of your order expelling all Jews from your department. The President has no objection to your expelling traitors and Jew peddlers, which, I suppose was the object of your order; but, as it in terms proscribed an entire religious class, some of whom are fighting in our ranks, the President deemed it necessary to revoke it." Official Records—Armies 1, XXIV, pt. 1, 9.

Thursday, January 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Mr. Prentiss, attorney for Herman Koppel of Charleston, appeals to President to remit proceeds of property condemned by prize court. Memorandum Concerning Herman Koppel, 22 January 1863, CW, 6:72.

Jonathan Amory, U.S. dispatch agent at Boston, interviews President on behalf of son, Col. Thomas J. C. Amory. Memorandum: Appointment of Thomas J. C. Amory, 22 January 1863, CW, 6:71-72.

Gen. McClernand, reduced to corps commander, blames Gen. Halleck and interviews President who counsels "that for your sake, for my sake, & for the country's sake," he forget personal grievances. Abraham Lincoln to John A. McClernand, 22 January 1863, CW, 6:70-71.

Lincoln advises Gen. Stephen A. Hurlbut to dismiss thought of coming to Washington now that "you stand well with the Sec. of War." Abraham Lincoln to Stephen A. Hurlbut, 22 January 1863, CW, 6:70.

Promises to nominate Gen. Frederick Steele a major general upon satisfactory explanation of charges made against him for returning fugitive slaves. Abraham Lincoln to Frederick Steele, 22 January 1863, CW, 6:72-73.

Transmits eighty-nine military nominations to the Senate, including twenty-three for major generals, sixty-three for brigadier generals, and three for hospital chaplains. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 22 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:5.

Friday, January 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Meets with Cabinet, except Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 23 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

President interviews Mrs. John Green who asks promotion for husband. Memorandum: Promotion of John Green, 23 January 1863, CW, 6:76.

Mrs. Col. Kingsbury calls on Lincoln and asks that John J. D. Kingsbury be appointed to West Point. Memorandum: Appointment of John J. D. Kingsbury, 23 January 1863, CW, 6:75-76.

President wishes secretary of war to arrange for Gen. Butler to start for New Orleans by February 1, 1863. "I think we can not longer dispense with Gen. Butler's service." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 23 January 1863, CW, 6:76-77.

Transmits to Congress report regarding regulations pertaining to U.S. consular courts in Turkey. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 23 January 1863, CW, 6:76.

Saturday, January 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President poses for photographs by Alexander Gardner, M. B. Brady's assistant. LL, No. 211.

Group of Boston antislavery men, including Wendell Phillips, calls on Lincoln, who excuses himself until next day. Moncure D. Conway, Autobiography, Memoirs, and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway, 2 vols. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1904), 377-82.

California committee meets with cabinet to discuss gauge of Pacific railroads. Welles, Diary.

"The reception at the Executive Mansion to-day by the President and Mrs. Lincoln was unusually well attended." New-York Herald, 25 January 1863; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 24 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:5.

Mrs. Lincoln grants interview to Wendell Phillips. Moncure D. Conway, Autobiography, Memoirs, and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway, 2 vols. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1904), 377-82.

Sunday, January 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President in 10 A.M. conference with Gens. Burnside and Halleck announces decision to relieve Burnside and put Gen. Hooker in command. Nicolay to Bates, 25 January 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 25 January 1863, CW, 6:77-78.

Boston antislavery group accompanied by Sen. Wilson (Mass.) calls upon President and complains that Emancipation Proclamation has failed to accomplish its purpose. William D. Kelley, Lincoln and Stanton: A Study of the War Administration of 1861 and 1862: with Special Consideration of Some Recent Statements of Gen. George B. McClellan (New York: Putnam, 1885), 87-88.

Monday, January 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to Major General Joseph Hooker, the new "head of the Army of the Potomac." Lincoln admires Hooker's bravery, "confidence," and "ambitio[n], which within reasonable bounds, does good rather than harm." But, Lincoln chides the General with respect to Hooker's predecessor General Ambrose Burnside: "[Y]ou . . . thwarted him as much as you could [and in so doing] . . . you did a great wrong to the country, and to a most meritorious and honorable brother officer. . . . Neither you, nor Napoleon, if he were alive again, could get any good out of an army, while such a spirit prevails . . . Beware of rashness, but with energy, and sleepless vigilance, go forward, and give us victories." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 26 January 1863, CW, 6:78-79.

Transmits to Senate documents respecting capture of British vessels having on board contraband of war. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 26 January 1863, CW, 6:79.

Tells O. H. Browning story of Gen. Burnside's resignation and Hooker's appointment. Browning, Diary.

Simon Cameron interviews President to protest sending Gen. Butler to New Orleans because Butler is likely candidate for next President and must be in Washington for political reasons. Butler, Correspondence, 2:590.

Presumably Mrs. Lincoln borrows from Library of Congress for use of Tad "Buckland Natural History." [Francis Trevelyan Buckland, Curiosities of Natural History, N.Y., 1859.] Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 114, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln thanks George E. Fawcett, music teacher of Muscatine, Iowa, "for your thoughtful courtesy in sending me a copy of your 'Emancipation March.' " Abraham Lincoln to George E. Fawcett, 26 January 1863, CW, 6:78.

Tuesday, January 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln writes to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton regarding John B. Gordon, whom U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs William P. Dole recommends for a "Military Storekeeper" position. Lincoln notes, "If there be a vacancy, let him have it, unless by some paper on file, I am committed for it to some one else." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 27 January 1863, IHi, Springfield, IL; CW, 10:176.

Wednesday, January 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews Gen. Andrew A. Humphreys regarding promotion. Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 28 January 1862 [1863], CW, 6:81.

Recommends vote of thanks of Congress be given Acting Rear Adm. David D. Porter for contributing to surrender of Post of Arkansas (Fort Hindman) on January 10, 1863. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 28 January 1863, CW, 6:82.

Summons Gen. Butler: "Please come here immediately. Telegraph me about what time you will arrive." Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin F. Butler, 28 January 1863, CW, 6:81-82.

Thursday, January 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Joshua F. Speed tells Lincoln that he does not want agency at Goose Creek Salt Works near Manchester, Ky. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 29 January 1863, CW, 6:83.

Lincoln writes Thurlow Weed: "Your valedictory to the patrons of the Albany Evening Journal brings me a good deal of uneasiness. What does it mean?" [Weed could not accept abolition fanaticism dividing the North.] Abraham Lincoln to Thurlow Weed, 29 January 1863, CW, 6:83-84.

Friday, January 30, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

Saturday, January 31, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives Sen. Powell (Ky.) who brings list of persons and fines collected from them by army officers in Kentucky. Memorandum Concerning Fines Collected from Kentuckians, 31 January 1863, CW, 6:85-86.

Writes Gen. Meigs on behalf of James C. Conkling of Illinois: "He has ample business qualifications, is entirely trustworthy; and with all is my personal friend of long standing." Abraham Lincoln to Montgomery C. Meigs, 31 January 1863, CW, 6:85.

Writes Col. Joseph P. Taylor, Commissary General: "Please see the bearer, Edward D. Baker, who is a son of my old friend Col. Baker, . . . He now wishes to be a Commissary . . . if you can inform me that he can be made such consistently with the rules of the service, I will oblige him." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph P. Taylor, 31 January 1863, CW, 6:86.

White House reception in evening attended by Gen. Heintzelman and wife. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sunday, February 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President explains to Gov. Morton (Ind.): "I think it would not do for me to meet you at Harrisburg." [Peace Democrats were advocating a Northwest Confederacy. Secret societies were being formed for purpose of sabotaging Union.] Abraham Lincoln to Oliver P. Morton, 1 February 1863, CW, 6:87-88.

Monday, February 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Mrs. Elbridge G. Spaulding and Col. Adrian R. Root, accompanied by Sen. Doolittle (Wis.), call on President to ask that Eliphalet N. Chester be sent to West Point. Memorandum: Appointment of Eliphalet N. Chester, 2 February 1863, CW, 6:88.

President acknowledges New Year's address from workingmen of London. Abraham Lincoln to the Workingmen of London, 2 February 1863, CW, 6:88-89.

Tuesday, February 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet discusses wisdom of shooting deserter as example to army. Welles, Diary.

Sen. Foot (Vt.) asks Lincoln to send William H. Hodges, nephew of Mrs. Foot, to West Point. Memorandum: Appointment of William H. Hodges, 3 February 1863, CW, 6:89-90.

White House requests copy of "Horacaii Opera" from Library of Congress. Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 114, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

[Source indicates German edition, possibly one published in Leipzig, 1856, edited by Carl Wilhelm Nauch, and Georg Theodor Krüger.] President addresses note to Sec. Stanton: "Sec. of War, please see Mr. Conkling, a good man, who comes as successor of Mr. Campbell, now deceased, as agent to settle accounts for Illinois." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 3 February 1863, CW, 6:90.

Wednesday, February 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives from Crafts J. Wright of Cincinnati offer to raise, discipline, and command brigade of Negro troops. DNA—WR 107, Off. Sec. War, Register of Letters Received, EB3, Entry 22.

Sends report on present conditions in Mexico to House of Representatives. Abraham Lincoln to the House of Representatives, 4 February 1863, CW, 6:90.

Telegraphs Gen. Robert C. Schenck: "I hear of some difficulty in the streets of Baltimore yesterday. What is the amount of it?" [Probably group of convalescents from Philadelphia showing their antipathy toward Negroes employed at Solders' Rest.] Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 4 February 1863, CW, 6:90.

Sends to Senate nomination of Comdr. Worden to be captain. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 4 February 1863, CW, 6:91.

Thursday, February 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President congratulates Francisco Solano Lopez upon his election as President of Republic of Paraguay. Abraham Lincoln to Francisco S. Lopez, 5 February 1863, CW, 6:91-92.

Transmits to Senate two conventions between U.S. and Peru for settlement of claims. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 5 February 1863, CW, 6:92; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 5 February 1863, CW, 6:92-93.

Receives three gentlemen from Boston interested in Navy and directs them to Sec. Seward. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 5 February 1863, CW, 6:93.

Recognizes David Stackfold as consul of Argentine Republic at Boston. Washington Star, 9 February 1863.

9 P.M. President and Mrs. Lincoln have Gen. and Mrs. Marcy as guests. Invitation, 5 February 1863, George B. McClellan Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln receives January salary warrant for $2,022.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.

President Lincoln writes to Major General Franz Sigel about the tone of an earlier letter he wrote to Sigel. Lincoln reveals that Brigadier General Carl Schurz "thinks I was a little cross in my late note to you." Lincoln apologizes and explains, "If I do get up a little temper I have no sufficient time to keep it up." Sigel recently complained that the President had slighted Sigel's comrade Brigadier General Julius Stahel. Abraham Lincoln to Franz Sigel, 5 February 1863, CW, 6:93.

Friday, February 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"Nothing of special importance at the Cabinet." Welles, Diary.

President congratulates Bartolomé Mitre on election to presidency of Argentine Republic. Abraham Lincoln to Bartolomé Mitre, 6 February 1863, CW, 6:94-95.

Sends to Senate documentation regarding ships and guns constructed for Japan. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 6 February 1863, CW, 6:95-96.

"I observe that the President never tells a joke now." Extracts from Dahlgren Diary, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Cong. James K. Moorhead (Pa.) interviews Lincoln relative to Charles Heintzelman and West Point, but gets no promise. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President sends information to Senate regarding death of Gen. Frederick T. Ward, U.S. citizen in military service of Chinese government. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 6 February 1863, CW, 6:96.

Saturday, February 7, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Afternoon reception of President and Mrs. Lincoln attracts many distinguished guests, partly because evening affairs are in abeyance. N.Y. Herald, 8 February 1863.

[Irwin withdraws $24.25 from Springfield Marine Bank to pay insurance on Lincoln's Springfield house. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]

Monday, February 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President spends typical administrative day: 1. directing sec. of war in military transfer, in project for raising Illinois regiments, and in selecting paymaster; 2. directing commissioner of general land office to hold hearing on 2 per cent fund associated with sale of public lands; 3. directing surgeon general to complete physical examination of Pvt. Henry Williams. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 9 February 1863, CW, 6:97; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 9 February 1863, CW, 6:97; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 9 February 1863, CW, 6:98; Abraham Lincoln to James M. Edmunds, 9 February 1863, CW, 6:96-97; Abraham Lincoln to William A. Hammond, 9 February 1863, CW, 6:97.

Tuesday, February 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President designates Gens. Hunter and Saxton together with three civilians as persons authorized to select lands for government use within state of South Carolina. Abraham Lincoln to David Hunter and Others, 10 February 1863, CW, 6:98-99.

Sends to Senate report from secretary of state regarding visit of H. Mercier to Richmond last April. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 10 February 1863, CW, 6:99.

Gen. Butler calls and asks President to send Philip Reade to West Point. Memorandum: Appointment of Philip Reade, 10 February 1863, CW, 6:99.

Sec. Welles presents to President name of Col. William Hawley for brigadier general. Welles, Diary.

White House personnel, probably Mrs. Lincoln, borrows book, "Cunningham Nell Gwynn," from Library of Congress. [Peter Cunningham, Story of Nell Gwynn; and the Sayings of Charles II, London, 1852.] Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 348, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Mrs. Lincoln entertains Gen. and Mrs. Heintzelman in evening. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Wednesday, February 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President prepares document to "Whom it may concern. Major General Butler, bearer of this, visits the Mississippi River, and localities thereon, at my request, for observation." [Not used by Butler.] Abraham Lincoln to Whom It May Concern, 11 February 1863, CW, 6:100.

Thursday, February 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Gen. Thomas F. Meagher interviews President on behalf of Cols. Robert Nugent and Patrick Kelly. Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 12 February 1863, CW, 6:101.

Lincoln holds conference with Secs. Stanton and Welles and Gen. Halleck on task of patrolling rivers. Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 12 February 1863, CW, 6:101.

Summons Asst. Sec. Fox to White House for information on Charleston expedition. Gustavus V. Fox, Confidential Correspondence of Gustavus Vasa Fox, 2 vols. (New York: n.p., 1918), 1:178.

Transmits to Senate: 1. report and documentation relating to mediation, arbitration, and similar measures looking to termination of existing civil war; 2. nomination of former Comdr. Preble to be commander on active list; 3. nomination of former Comdr. Roger Perry (USN, commission expired) to be commander. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 12 February 1863, CW, 6:101-2; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 12 February 1863, CW, 6:102; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 12 February 1863, CW, 6:102-3.

Friday, February 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

On invitation of Gen. John G. Barnard, President and Sec. Stanton drive across Potomac to Fort Dekalb, Va., for demonstration of George W. Beardslee's electric detonating system or blasting apparatus. Bruce, Tools of War, 226.

Congressman George H. Yeaman (Ky.) confers with Lincoln about transfer of General Richard W. Johnson. Memorandum Concerning Transfer of Richard W. Johnson, 13 February 1863, CW, 6:104.

President communicates to House of Representatives all information in Department of Interior respecting causes of recent outbreaks of Indian tribes in Northwest. Abraham Lincoln to Galusha A. Grow, 13 February 1863, CW, 6:104.

Forwards to Senate report concerning employment by French Emperor of African troops in Mexico. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 13 February 1863, CW, 6:105.

General Cassius M. Clay is in Washington awaiting President's decision on appointment of minister to Russia. Lincoln to Cameron, 13 February 1863, Simon Cameron Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

At 8:00 P.M., President and Mrs. Lincoln give small evening reception for fifty guests in honor of "General Tom Thumb" (Charles S. Stratton) and bride (Lavinia Warren). Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 14 February 1863, 2d ed., 2:1-2; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 14 February 1863, 2d ed., 3:1; Washington Chronicle, 14 February 1863; Nicolay to Bates, 15 February 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Saturday, February 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President, Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, and party travel across Potomac to watch "Col. Alexander set off a forigarre." Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Rear Admiral John A. Dahlgren goes to White House to check report that ironclads at Charleston need ammunition. Later President calls him back for conference with General Halleck and Assistant Secretary Fox. Lincoln "is restless about Charleston." Extracts from Dahlgren Diary, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

"Reception at White House to-day unusually largely attended. For two hours the throng of visitors pressed in a steady current." N. Y. Herald, 15 February 1863; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 14 February 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Mrs. Fox calls on Mrs. Lincoln and finds her in high spirits. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sunday, February 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Gen. Andrew J. Hamilton recommends to President that separate department be created for Texas. Hamilton to Lincoln, 16 February 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President studies plan to attack Charleston with Gens. Halleck and John G. Foster and with Sec. Stanton and Asst. Sec. Fox. Gustavus V. Fox, Confidential Correspondence of Gustavus Vasa Fox, 2 vols. (New York: n.p., 1918), 1:179-80.

6 P.M. Gen. Butler is guest at informal White House dinner. Butler, Correspondence, 3:13.

Monday, February 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President requests secretaries of war and navy to appoint an officer from each department to test incendiary shell and fluid of Alfred Berney, chemist at Jersey City. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton and Gideon Welles, 16 February 1863, CW, 6:107.

Confers with Sec. Welles on sending Asst. Sec. Fox to advise Rear Adm. Samuel F. Du Pont at Charleston. Welles, Diary.

Consults with Rear Adm. Dahlgren about "some inflammable humbug" and plan of attack on Charleston. Bruce, Tools of War, 229.

Inquires of Atty. Gen. Bates if it is lawful for President to return fine of $40 to Nathan Darling, captain of Capitol police. Abraham Lincoln to Edward Bates, 16 February 1863, CW, 6:106-7.

Tuesday, February 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President transmits to Senate treaty with Potawatomi Nation in Kansas. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 17 February 1863, CW, 6:109.

Reads to cabinet letters between himself and Cong.-elect Fernando Wood, former mayor of New York. Welles, Diary.

Consults with General Benjamin F. Butler regarding Butler's next command. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 17 February 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Interviews Thurlow Weed who asks that Charles Heintzelman be sent to West Point. Journal, 18 February 1863, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

At 7 P.M. receives W. H. Tyler, chairman, and members of New York committee bearing resolutions concerning colonization of Florida with "armed free labor colonies." Memorandum Concerning Interview with W. H. Tyler and Committee, 17 February 1863, CW, 6:108.

Lincoln writes to Major General William S. Rosecrans and reveals a strategy to offset Confederate "raids of rapidly moving small bodies of troops [that are] . . . harrassing, and discouraging loyal residents, supplying themselves with provisions, clothing, horses . . . surprising and capturing small detachments of our forces, and breaking our communications." Lincoln concludes, "I think we should organize proper forces, and make counter-raids." He asks, "What think you of trying to get up such a corps in your army?" Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 17 February 1863, CW, 6:108-9.

Wednesday, February 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cong. Arnold (Ill.) accompanies Col. Joseph H. Tucker of Chicago to interview President on probability of getting Henry R. Tucker, not yet 16 years old, into West Point. Memorandum: Appointment of Henry R. Tucker, 18 February 1863, CW, 6:110.

President transmits to Senate additional article to treaty with Great Britain regarding suppression of African slave trade. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 18 February 1863, CW, 6:110.

Instructs Sec. Seward to convene cabinet at 10 A.M. tomorrow. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 18 February 1863, CW, 6:110-11.

Thursday, February 19, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At special cabinet meeting President presents question of extra session of Senate and brevetting of regular officers. Welles, Diary; Bates, Diary.

Lincoln requests copy of letter from Asst. Sec. Fox to Rear Adm. Du Pont and hopes that Fox will go to Charleston before attack. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Receives request from Senate for copy of letter written by Gen. Scott to secretary of war relative to insubordination of Gen. McClellan. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 7 March 1863.

Writes W. H. Herndon: "Would you accept a job of about a month's duration at St. Louis, five dollars a day & mileage? Answer." [Herndon declined the assignment.] Abraham Lincoln to William H. Herndon, 19 February 1863, CW, 6:111.

Sends following nominations to Senate: 1. Commodore Charles H. Davis to be rear admiral; 2. Capt. John A. Dahlgren to be rear admiral; 3. Capt. Stephen C. Rowan to be commodore; 4. Comdr. David D. Porter to be captain. [Davis and Dahlgren were appointed retroactively rear admirals as of February 7, 1863, and Rowan a commodore as of July 16, 1862.] Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 19 February 1863, CW, 6:111-12.

Writes Thurlow Weed: "The matters I spoke to you about are important; I hope you will not neglect them." [In this connection approximately fifteen New York merchants pledge $1,000 each. Probably raised to finance party machinery.] Abraham Lincoln to Thurlow Weed, 19 February 1863, CW, 6:112-13.

Friday, February 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President in long morning conversation with chiefs of Chippewa Indians. Washington Chronicle, 21 February 1863.

Borrows for White House, "Richter Werke, vol. 14 to 17 incl." [Johann Paul Freidrich Richter, Jean Paul's Sammtliche Werke, Berlin, 1826-28.] Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 348, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Saturday, February 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cong. John S. Watts (New Mexico Terr.) and friends interview President on behalf of John Wilson for surveyor general of Arizona Territory. Memoranda: Appointment of John Wilson, 21 February 1863, CW, 6:113.

"Public reception at White House to-day was very numerously attended. . . . The President was cordial in his greetings, and Mrs. Lincoln manifested towards all visitors the affability for which she is distinguished." N.Y. Herald, 22 February 1863; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 21 February 1863, 2:4.

"President looks haggard and careworn . . . yet he preserves his good nature." Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 28 February 1863.

Dr. Anson G. Henry, old family friend, is dinner guest. CW, 8:511.

Sunday, February 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President declines to preside at meeting of U.S. Christian Commission in House of Representatives. CW, 8:511; Abraham Lincoln to Alexander Reed, 22 February 1863, CW, 6:114-15.

Sen. Doolittle (Wis.) and Gen. Heintzelman confer with Lincoln about changing date of Gen. C. S. Hamilton's commission. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Monday, February 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives resignation of Simon Cameron as U.S. minister to Court of St. Petersburg. Cameron to Lincoln, 23 February 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Requests interview: "Will Senator Wilson please call and see me." [Directed to either Sen. Wilson (Mass.) or Sen. Robert Wilson (Mo.).] Abraham Lincoln to Senator Wilson, 23 February 1863, CW, 6:115.

Tuesday, February 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet discusses propriety of sending letter of Gen. Scott, written just before his retirement, to Senate, and rumor of loss of U.S.S. "Queen of the West." Welles, Diary; Bates, Diary.

Delegation from West Virginia calls on President and asks for greater military protection against increasing guerrilla warfare. Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 24 February 1863, CW, 6:115-16.

Lincoln converses with Judge William H. Robertson of New York on current political problems. Robertson to Lincoln, 25 February 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Occupies private box at Grover's Theatre, E St., bet. 13th and 14th Sts. NW., for performance by Barney Williams, blackface minstrel and Irish comedian. N.Y. Herald, 26 February 1863.

[Irwin withdraws $25.13 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]

Wednesday, February 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President approves act establishing system of national banks. J. Duane Squires, "Some Enduring Achievements of the Lincoln Administration, 1861-65," Abraham Lincoln Quarterly 5 (December 1848):198-99.

Sends nominations to Senate for "Passed Midshipman Samuel Pearce and Nathaniel T. West, now on the retired list, to be ensigns in the Navy on the retired list." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 25 February 1863, CW, 6:116-17.

Thursday, February 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews William W. Danenhower, Chicago attorney who wants to be fourth auditor of treasury. Memorandum: Appointment of William W. Danenhower, 26 February 1863, CW, 6:118.

Receives request from Gen. Cassius M. Clay to push his nomination to Court of St. Petersburg in spite of congressional objection. Albert A. Woldman, Lincoln and the Russians (Cleveland: World Publishing Co., 1952), 121-22.

Atty. Gen. Bates consults with Lincoln at War Dept. about antidraft riots in Missouri. Bates, Diary.

Friday, February 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President and Sec. Chase discuss appointment of collectors for Hartford district in Connecticut. Chase to Lincoln, 2 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Cong. Elijah Babbitt (Pa.) urges President to appoint son of Judge Garrick Mallery to West Point. Memorandum: Appointment of John C. Mallery, 27 February 1863, CW, 6:119.

Several senators and representatives call on President concerning report on California trade. Memorandum Concerning Report on California Trade, 27 February 1863, CW, 6:119.

Lincoln writes B. Williams, who seeks appointment for nephew: "I really wish to oblige you; but the best I can do is to keep the papers, and try to find a place before long." Abraham Lincoln to Barney Williams, 27 February 1863, CW, 6:120.

Saturday, February 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President calls special session of Senate for March 4, 1863 to handle backlog of appointments and promotions. Proclamation Convening the Senate, 28 February 1863, CW, 6:120-21.

Transmits to Senate correspondence with workingmen in England. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 28 February 1863, CW, 6:121.

Sends to Congress documentation regarding "distressed operatives of Blackburn," England. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 28 February 1863, CW, 6:121-22.

Arthur M. Eastman, arms manufacturer of Massachusetts, confers with Lincoln about guns as directed by Sec. Stanton . Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 28 February 1863, CW, 6:122.

Following customary practice at the close of a Congressional session, Lincoln occupies President's Room at Capitol to facilitate public business by saving the Committee on Enrolled Bills from traveling the length of Pennsylvania Avenue for his signature. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 28 February 1863, 2d ed., 2:4; N.Y. Herald, 1 March 1863.

Does not attend usual Saturday afternoon reception at White House. Mrs. Lincoln and Private Secretary William O. Stoddard greet guests. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 28 February 1863, 2d ed., 2:4; Washington Chronicle, 2 March 1863.

Sunday, March 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President confers about military appointments with Sec. Stanton , Gens. Halleck and Heintzelman, and Adjt. Gen. Thomas in Stanton 's office. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Monday, March 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln forwards to Congress acceptance by New Mexico Territory of land grants for colleges. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 2 March 1863, CW , 6:123-24.

"Last levee of the season of President Lincoln and his lady took place at the Presidential Mansion last evening, and was the best attended and most brilliant one of the many given this winter." Washington Chronicle, 3 March 1863; N.Y. Herald, 3 March 1863.

Tuesday, March 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President spends part of day with Asst. Sec. Fox. Seems "depressed." Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Approves act authorizing free mail delivery in 49 cities of U.S. and act authorizing grant of public lands to Kansas for railroad and telegraph construction. Stat. L., XII, 701, 772.

Joint congressional committee notifies President of adjournment unless he has further communications. Senate Journal, 444.

President approves bill establishing National Academy of Sciences. J. Duane Squires, "Some Enduring Achievements of the Lincoln Administration, 1861-65," Abraham Lincoln Quarterly 5 (December 1848):209; Stat. L., XII, 806.

Occupies President's Room at Capitol until near 11 P.M. Secs. Seward and Welles, and Postmaster Gen. Blair also present. Washington Chronicle, 4 March 1863; N.Y. Herald, 4 March 1863.

Wednesday, March 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews Jonathan Haines, holder of patent on harvesting machine, and gives him letter of introduction. Abraham Lincoln to David P. Holloway, 4 March 1863, CW, 6:124.

Congratulates Miguel San Roman on election to presidency of Republic of Peru. Abraham Lincoln to Miguel de San Roman, 4 March 1863, CW, 6:124.

Sends for Asst. Sec. Fox to explain certain dispatches. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Consults with Postmaster Gen. Blair about problems for colonizing Negroes. Blair to Lincoln, 5 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Thursday, March 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln forwards $868, to U.S. Treasurer Francis E. Spinner. Lincoln received the money together with a letter from an anonymous writer, of Brooklyn, New York. The writer explained, "I came by [the money] in a dishonest manner . . . Being tempted, in an unguarded moment I consented to take it being very much in want of money but thanks be to my Saviour I was led by the influences of the Holy Spirit to see my great sin and to return it to you as the representative of the United States." Anonymous. "Candide Secure" to Abraham Lincoln, 2 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Receipt from Francis E. Spinner, 5 March 1863, CW, 6:125.

Senate committee announces to President that Senate is ready to receive communications. Senate Journal, 449. Sec.

Welles spends most of evening until 11 P.M. in President's room. Welles, Diary.

Lincoln receives February salary warrant for $2,022.34. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.

Friday, March 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President confers with Marshal Lamon and Atty. Gen. Bates regarding execution of Augustus Ford for murder. Washington Chronicle, 7 March 1863.

In evening sees Gen. Fremont by appointment and promises to tell him something definite about new command. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 7 March 1863, CW, 6:127.

Saturday, March 7, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Rear Adm. Dahlgren visits President and finds him nervous and uneasy. Extracts from Dahlgren Diary, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sen. Wade (Ohio), chairman, Committee on Conduct of War, confers with President at 8 P.M. Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin F. Wade, 7 March 1863, CW, 6:128.

White House public receptions over for season. Saturday afternoon receptions from 1 to 3 P.M. begin. Washington Chronicle, 7 March 1863.

Lincoln asks Sec. Seward to come over "and bring the 'Marque & Reprisal' bill with you." Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 7 March 1863, CW, 6:126.

Directs Sec. Stanton : "Please see Gen. Halleck to-day; and if you can get him half agreed, I agree" to an appointment for Gen. Fremont. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 7 March 1863, CW, 6:127.

Refers letter of this date to Secs. Stanton and Welles with endorsement: "Submitted to Mars & Neptune." Dix to Lincoln, 7 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sunday, March 8, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln approves memorandum of Sec. Seward to Lord Lyons suggesting that England allow no more ships built and slipped out of her ports for ultimate service to Confederate States of America. Monaghan, Diplomat, 291.

Interviews Edward L. Baker, editor, "Illinois State Journal," relative to brevets in Marine Corps. Baker to Welles, 9 March 1863, Gideon Welles Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Monday, March 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cong. Thaddeus Stevens (Pa.) asks President to give Col. Joseph W. Fisher place of Gen. Edwin H. Stoughton, captured in bed at 2 A.M., March 9, 1863, at Fairfax, Va., by Gen. John S. Mosby (CSA). Memorandum Concerning Joseph W. Fisher, 9 March 1863, CW, 6:129.

Brig. Gen. of Vols. W. F. Smith interviews President to adjust rank as major general in regular Army. Memorandum Concerning William F. Smith, 9 March 1863, CW, 6:129-30.

Sen. Lemuel J. Bowden (Va.), Mr. Boyd, editor, and John Hawxhurst, Virginia legislator, call on President and ask promotion of Col. Joseph Snider, 7th Virginia Regiment, to brigadier general. Memorandum Concerning Joseph Snider, 9 March 1863, CW, 6:130.

President interviews Mil. Gov. John S. Phelps (Ark.) in presence of Sec. Stanton on proposition for placing army of 12,000 to 15,000 men in Arkansas, ready to move immediately on fall of Vicksburg, Miss. Phelps to Lincoln, 9 March 1863, Edwin M. Stanton Papers, Library of Congress, Washington DC.

Asks War Dept.: "Can any thing be done for this Lady-friend of Marshal Lamon? I do not see how." [Probably Miss Maria A. Donnelly of Martinsburg, Va., whose sister had been recently released from imprisonment in Richmond.] Endorsement, 9 March 1863, CW, 6:128.

Tuesday, March 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Leopold C. P. Cooper of Norfolk, asks Lincoln to place Leopold O. Parker in West Point. Memorandum: Appointment of Leopold O. Parker, 10 March 1863, CW, 6:132.

President proclaims amnesty to soldiers absent without leave. Proclamation Granting Amnesty to Soldiers Absent without Leave, 10 March 1863, CW, 6:132-33.

Cabinet discusses regulations for letters of marque. Welles, Diary.

9 P.M. President, Secs. Seward and Stanton , Gen. Heintzelman, and several Senators discuss sending troops to protect Arizona. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Wednesday, March 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Col. Edward B. Cross, accompanied by Sen. Hale (N.H.), calls on President and asks promotion. Memorandum: Appointment of Edward E. Cross, 11 March 1863, CW, 6:133.

Cong. Rollins (Mo.) interviews Lincoln on behalf of Col. Odon Guitar. Memorandum: Appointment of Odon Guitar, 11 March 1863, CW, 6:133-34.

Thursday, March 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President transmits to Senate treaty with chiefs and headmen of Chippewa Indians. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 12 March 1863, CW, 6:135.

Listens to report from Rear Adm. Du Pont in office to Sec. Welles. Welles, Diary.

Friday, March 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives Mrs. Winston from Tennessee and permits her to remove wounded son from prison in Fort McHenry, Md. Abraham Lincoln to William W. Morris, 13 March 1863, CW, 6:135; Rice, 507-8.

Cabinet continues to discuss letters of marque. Bates, Diary.

Senate committee notifies President of adjournment unless he has further communications. Senate Journal, 455.

Lincoln attends Washington Theatre to see James H. Hackett as Falstaff in Henry IV. James H. Hackett to Abraham Lincoln, 20 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Saturday, March 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President sends congratulations to Isabel II, Queen of Spain, on birth of nephew, son of Duchess of Montpensier. Abraham Lincoln to Isabel II, 14 March 1863, CW, 6:136.

Interviews Sen. Thomas H. Hicks (Md.) and delegation on behalf of Col. George Sangster. Memorandum: Promotion of George Sangster, 14 March 1863, CW, 6:136.

Borrows copy of "Hume's England Vols., 3 & 4" from Library of Congress. [David Hume, The History of England, London: 1754-62?] Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 348, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sunday, March 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives members of committee from New York who "enumerate ships now building in English yards professedly for the Emperor of China, but really for our rebels." Pierce, Sumner Memoir and Letters, 4:129.

In evening Lincoln and Sen. Sumner (Mass.) read aloud to each other from Theodore D. Woolsey's "Introduction to the Study of International Law." [Boston: 1860] Pierce, Sumner Memoir and Letters, 4:121.

Monday, March 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Hugh W. Crothers, aide to Gov. Peirpoint (Va.), calls on President in interest of Col. Isaac H. Duval. Memorandum Concerning Isaac H. Duval, 16 March 1863, CW, 6:136-37.

Former Cong. Kellian Van R. Whaley (Va.) visits President to get Rev. Henry Stevens appointed hospital chaplain. Memorandum: Appointment of Henry Stevens, 16 March 1863, CW, 6:137.

Cabinet meets. Discusses whether to issue letters of marque under new statute. Pierce, Sumner Memoir and Letters, 4:129.

Tuesday, March 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln sends for Asst. Sec. Fox to learn about failure of Rear Adm. Farragut to run by Port Hudson, La. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Cong. Henry W. Davis (Md.) discusses organization of new House of Representatives with President. Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Davis, 18 March 1863, CW, 6:140-41.

Cabinet meeting continues subject of privateering. Bates, Diary.

President Lincoln and his wife, Mary, tour the Patent Office. A newspaper reports, "This temple of American genius has lately received additions . . . Mrs. Lincoln, with characteristic unselfishness, has sent from the White House a splendid variety of the presents of the Kings of Siam and the Tycoon of Japan. Among the most noticeable is a suit of Japanese armor . . . for which the Knight of La Mancha would have given his boots. . . . The President and Mrs. Lincoln seemed to enjoy greatly this respite from the cares of State among so many interesting objects." New York Herald, 20 March 1863, 4:5.

Lincoln writes to Major General William S. Rosecrans and responds to the general's list of complaints. Rosecrans recently achieved a military victory, which, he claims, prompted Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton to offer Rosecrans "'Anything you & your command want.'" Rosecrans complains that he did not receive the military commission date he requested. Lincoln responds, "Truth to speak, I do not appreciate this matter of rank on paper, as you officers do. The world will not forget that you fought the battle of 'Stone River' and it will never care a fig whether you rank Gen. [Ulysses S.] Grant on paper, or he so, ranks you." William S. Rosecrans to Abraham Lincoln, 16 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 17 March 1863, CW, 6:138-40.

Writes Joshua F. Speed: "Confidential. . . . Lyman Guinnip [dealer in agricultural implements at Danville, Ill.], is under an indictment at Louisville, something about slaves. I knew him slightly. . . . I scarcely think he is guilty of any real crime Please try if you can not slip him through." Abraham Lincoln to Joshua F. Speed, 17 March 1863, CW, 6:140.

Wednesday, March 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President proclaims treaty of commerce and navigation with Republic of Liberia. Washington Chronicle, 29 April 1863.

Cong. Julian (Ind.) confers with President about appointments and refers to unemployment of Gen. Fremont. Lincoln admits that he does not know where to put him. George W. Julian, Political Recollections 1840-1872 (Chicago: Jansen, McClurg, 1884), 229-30.

President Lincoln writes to Congressman Henry W. Davis, of Maryland. Davis seeks Lincoln's "opinion" regarding the "organization of the House—on the election of Speaker." Lincoln writes, "[T]he supporters of the war should send no man to congress who will not go into caucus with the unconditional supporters of the war, and abide the action of such caucus, and support in the House, the person therein nominated for Speaker. Let the friends of the government first save the government, and then administer it to their own liking." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Davis, 18 March 1863, CW, 6:140-41.

Thursday, March 19, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Gov. John A. Gurley (Arizona Terr.) and John N. Goodwin, chief justice, Arizona Territory, consult further with President about troops. Sec. Stanton and Postmaster Gen. Blair are present. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Washington Chronicle, 20 March 1863.

Friday, March 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President revokes courtmartial sentence of Thomas W. Knox, correspondent of New York "Herald," "if Gen. Grant shall give his express assent." Abraham Lincoln to Whom It May Concern, 20 March 1863, CW, 6:142-43.

Gov. Gurley (Arizona Terr.) again confers with President and believes matter of troops settled. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Pursuant to law, President declares public sales of lands in Washington Territory, Michigan, and Kansas. Washington Chronicle, 1 April 1863.

Saturday, March 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln sends his old friend Dr. Anson G. Henry, surveyor general of Washington Territory, with a note to Sec. Chase. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 21 March 1863, CW, 6:144.

[Irwin deposits $472.50 in Springfield Marine Bank, balance of principal and interest on A. J. Van Deren note. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165.]

Monday, March 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln endorses letter of Alexander Williamson: "Submitted to the Sec. of Treasury. Mr. Williamson, writer of the within was our 'Willie's' teacher; and I would be really glad for him to be obliged." Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 23 March 1863, CW, 6:144-45.

Lincoln writes to the recently-elected Governor of New York, Horatio Seymour. Lincoln seeks Seymour's support for the war effort, and explains, "In the performance of my duty, the co-operation of your State . . . is needed—in fact, is indispensable. This alone is a sufficient reason why I should wish to be at a good understanding with you." On numerous occasions, Seymour, a Democrat, spoke out against the Lincoln administration's war policies, chief among them the Emancipation Proclamation. Lincoln writes, "As to maintaining the nation's life, and integrity, I assume, and believe, there can not be a difference of purpose between you and me. If we should differ as to the means, it is important that such difference should be as small as possible." Abraham Lincoln to Horatio Seymour, 23 March 1863, CW, 6:145-46; Alexander J. Wall, A Sketch of the Life of Horatio Seymour 1810-1886 (Lancaster, PA: Lancaster Press, 1929), 23-25.

Tuesday, March 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln directs Sec. Stanton : "Let [Col.] James H. Ledlie [3d New York Artillery] . . . be made a Brigadier General, if it is legally possible." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 24 March 1863, CW, 6:147.

Inquires of secretary of war: "Can not this sum of 250,000 be paid at once?" Amount requested by governor of Kentucky to aid in raising new troops. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 24 March 1863, CW, 6:147.

Wednesday, March 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President commutes death sentence of James S. Pleasants, citizen of Montgomery County, Md., to imprisonment during war. Commutation of Sentence of James S. Pleasants, 25 March 1863, CW, 6:148.

Authorizes Benjamin Gratz to shelter Mrs. Susan S. Grigsby, wife of Confederate officer, and "be responsible for what she may do." Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin Gratz, 25 March 1863, CW, 6:148.

Refuses request of Gen. Rosecrans to renominate Gen. Robert B. Mitchell. Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 25 March 1863, CW, 6:148-49.

Forwards five-pound bank note from British subject to U.S. Christian Commission for purchase of Bibles. Stuart to Lincoln, 25 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Greets at White House six exchanged soldiers who took part in Andrews train raid in April 1862. Washington Chronicle, 26 March 1863.

Attends Grover's Theatre with Private Secretary John G. Nicolay to witness performance of Hamlet starring E. L. Davenport. Daily National Republican, 26 March 1863, 2d ed., 2:5; N.Y. Herald, 26 March 1863.

[Irwin draws draft for $10.79 to pay taxes on Council Bluffs, Iowa, land. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]

Thursday, March 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to Tennessee's military governor, Andrew Johnson, and urges him to "rais[e] a negro military force." The move would inspire Unionists because, Lincoln explains, Johnson is an "eminent citizen of a slave-state, and himself a slave-holder." Lincoln adds, "The colored population is the great available and yet unavailed of, force for restoring the Union. The bare sight of fifty thousand armed, and drilled black soldiers on the banks of the Mississippi, would end the rebellion at once." Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 26 March 1863, CW, 6:149-50.

Interviews Eli Parker of New York regarding appointment. Abraham Lincoln to Montgomery C. Meigs, 26 March 1863, CW, 6:150.

"The President is in excellent spirits to-day." N.Y. Herald, 27 March 1863.

Mary F. Carpenter visits President. Mary F. Carpenter to Abraham Lincoln, 27 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln shakes hands with Mr. Fowler, old Shaker friend of Secretary of State Seward. William H. Seward to Abraham Lincoln, 26 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Friday, March 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Former Lt. Gov. Daniel S. Dickinson (N.Y.) and friend, Edward J. Westcott, confer with President on trading at Newbern, N.C. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 27 March 1863, CW, 6:150.

In the East Room of the White House, Lincoln meets with a contingent of Indian chiefs, two of whom speak through a translator. Cheyenne Chief Lean Bear expresses concern about the number of whites moving west. He desires "peace," but wonders if the "white men on the plains" want the same. Arapahoe Chief Spotted Wolf seeks Lincoln's words of wisdom. Lincoln asserts that the whites are more "prosperous because they cultivate the earth." He adds, in spite of the civil war now taking place, whites are less inclined "to fight and kill one another as our red brethren." Daily Morning Chronicle (Washington, DC), 28 March 1863, 1:1-2; Speech to Indians, 27 March 1863, CW, 6:151-53.

James Blake of Indianapolis, Ind., discusses appointments with President. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 27 March 1863, CW, 6:153.

Lincoln receives Jacob Wilson on recommendation of Mayor George Opdyke (N.Y.) and directs him to Sec. Stanton . Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 27 March 1863, CW, 6:154.

Saturday, March 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"There will be no more Saturday afternoon receptions at the Executive Mansion during the remainder of the season." Washington Chronicle, 28 March 1863.

Sunday, March 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President informs Gen. Banks, commanding Dept. of the Gulf, that Gen. Daniel Ullmann will undertake to raise Negro brigade in department and will need help. Abraham Lincoln to Nathaniel P. Banks, 29 March 1863, CW, 6:154-55.

President in chief clerk's room at Navy Dept. conversing with Sec. Welles and Asst. Sec. Fox; "looks thin and badly—is very nervous and complains of everything." Extracts from Dahlgren Diary, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Writes Sec. Stanton : "I fear—in fact, believe—the despatch you mentioned is utter humbuggery. . . . Besides there are no six-iron-clads, nor 15000 men at Vicksburg to pass through the canal, even if the Mississippi river had risen fifteen feet in as many minutes." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 29 March 1863, CW, 6:155.

Monday, March 30, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President sets apart April 30, 1863 "as a day of national humiliation, fasting and prayer." Washington Chronicle, 1 April 1863; Proclamation Appointing a National Fast Day, 30 March 1863, CW, 6:155-57.

Tuesday, March 31, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President permits restricted commercial intercourse with inhabitants of insurrectionary States. License of Commercial Intercourse, 31 March 1863, CW, 6:157.

Confers with Gen. Hooker on military subjects. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 18 April 1863.

Accompanied by Secs. Seward, Chase, and Usher, and Postmaster Gen. Blair, attends Union meeting at Capitol. "The greatest popular demonstration ever known in Washington." Washington Chronicle, 1 April 1863.

Tad climbs on and off President's lap several times. "Father Abe looks so careworn that one could but pity him." Robert L. Kincaid, "Julia Susan Wheelock, the Florence Nightingale of Michigan during the War," Lincoln Herald 46 (October 1944):44.

Wednesday, April 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews John B. S. Todd whose commission expired July 17, 1862, and promises to nominate him again for brigadier general, if one or two senators agree to change their votes. Todd to Cameron, 2 April 1863, Simon Cameron Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Confers with Gov. Edward Salomon (Wis.) regarding establishment of U.S. general hospital in that state. DNA—WR RG 94, Adjt. Gen. Off., Letters Received, Misc. Branch, XXXIX, Sup. 1, 1064.

Discusses Missouri affairs with S. T. Glover and Atty. Gen. Bates. Bates, Diary.

President Lincoln writes to Major General David Hunter regarding Hunter's deployment of black soldiers at Jacksonville, Florida. Lincoln writes, "It is important to the enemy that such a force shall not take shape, and grow, and thrive, in the South; and in precisely the same proportion, it is important to us that it shall. Hence the utmost caution and vigilance is necessary on our part. The enemy will make extra efforts to destroy them; and we should do the same to preserve and increase them." Abraham Lincoln to David Hunter, 1 April 1863, CW, 6:158.

Thursday, April 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President by proclamation reduces scope of commercial intercourse with insurrectionary states. Proclamation about Commercial Intercourse, 2 April 1863, CW, 6:159-60.

Convinces Sec. Welles that Rear Adm. Farragut's position should be strengthened. Accordingly Welles orders Rear Adm. Du Pont to send all but two ironclads to New Orleans as soon as Charleston surrenders. Gustavus V. Fox, Confidential Correspondence of Gustavus Vasa Fox, 2 vols. (New York: n.p., 1918), 1:197; West, Welles, 231.

President and Mrs. Lincoln receive at public White House reception. Jane Grey Swisshelm, abolitionist journalist, meets Lincoln for first time. Frank Klement, "Jane Grey Swisshelm and Lincoln: A Feminist Fusses and Frets," Abraham Lincoln Quarterly 6 (December 1950):234-35.

In evening President calls at Welles' house to read letter prepared by Welles concerning privateers. Welles, Diary.

Deposits June 1862 salary warrant for $2,083.33 in Riggs Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.

Friday, April 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Mr. Martin, Philadelphia artist, is engaged in painting full-length portraits of President and his two sons. Washington Chronicle, 3 April 1863.

At cabinet meeting Secs. Welles and Seward discuss letters of marque. Welles, Diary.

President Lincoln telegraphs Commander of the Army of the Potomac Major General Joseph Hooker concerning Lincoln's upcoming visit to Hooker's headquarters. Lincoln and others will depart the next evening "on the boat; go over from Acquia-creek to your camp Sunday morning; remain with you till Tuesday morning, and then return. Our party will probably not exceed six persons of all sorts." Lincoln's traveling companions include his wife Mary, their son Tad, Attorney General Edward Bates, and journalist Noah Brooks. Howard K. Beale, ed., The Diary of Edward Bates 1859-1866 (Washington, DC: United States Government Printing Office, 1933), 287; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 3 April 1863, CW, 6:161.

Saturday, April 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC and En route to General Hooker's Headquarters.

President receives several members of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 4 April 1863, 2d ed., 2:2.

Recognizes George Papendick as consul of Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg Schwerin. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 8 April 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Confers with Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles and Assistant Secretary Fox about granting letters of marque to applicant. Gideon Welles, Lincoln and Seward: Remarks upon the Memorial Address of Chas. Francis Adams, on the Late Wm. H. Seward (New York: Sheldon, 1874), 163-64.

Congratulates Isabel II, Queen of Spain, on birth of son to Infanta Maria Christina. Abraham Lincoln to Isabel II, 4 April 1863, CW, 6:162.

Interviews Miss Davis who asks for appointment of her brother, John M. K. Davis, to West Point. Memorandum: Appointment of John M. K. Davis, 4 April 1863, CW, 6:162.

President and party consisting of Mrs. Lincoln and Tad, Noah Brooks, California journalist, Dr. Henry, Attorney General Bates, and Captain Medorem Crawford of Oregon leave Navy Yard about 5 P.M. aboard steamer Carrie Martin. Snowstorm forces them to stop for night in cove on Potomac River opposite Indian Head, Md. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 6 April 1863, 2d ed., 2:1; Bates, Diary.

"Castine" [Noah Brooks], Washington, April 12, 1863, in Sacramento Union, May 8, 1863. Lincoln writes memorandum on harbor defenses: "I have a single idea of my own about harbor defences. It is a Steam-ram, built so as to sacrifice nearly all capacity for carrying, to those of speed and strength. . . . her business would be to guard a particular harbour, as a Bull-dog guards his master's door." Memorandum Concerning Harbor Defenses, 4 April 1863, CW, 6:163.

Sunday, April 5, 1863.+-

Aquia Creek, VA, Falmouth, VA, and General Hooker's Headquarters.

President and party of six arrive at mouth of Aquia Creek Sunday morning. Board special train at 10 A.M. and reach General Hooker's headquarters at Falmouth about noon. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 6 April 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Occupy three large hospital tents. Brooks, Washington, 48.

Lincoln reads "rebel papers" for news of Charleston. Noah Brooks, "Personal Reminiscences of Lincoln," Scribner's Monthly 15 (1877/1878):673.

Monday, April 6, 1863.+-

Falmouth, VA.

Grand review postponed because of weather. Washington Chronicle, 7 April 1863.

President rides horseback from place to place visiting disabled soldiers. Brooks, Washington, 48.

President Lincoln, his wife Mary, their son Tad, Attorney General Edward Bates, and others visit the Army of the Potomac's headquarters. A newspaper reports, "The visit . . . has served to relieve the monotony of camp life . . . It is pleasant also to see a lady in the camp, and Mrs. Lincoln probably had a new experience in sleeping for the first time in her life in a tent." Bates recalled that the presidential party "attended the review of Cavalry—in grand style . . . over 10.000 cavalry—the grandest sight I ever saw." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 7 April 1863, 2:1; Howard K. Beale, ed, The Diary of Edward Bates 1859-1866 (Washington, DC: United States Government Printing Office, 1933), 287-288.

Receives March salary warrant for $2,022.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.

Tuesday, April 7, 1863.+-

Falmouth, VA.

President authorizes Asst. Sec. Watson to perform duties of secretary of war in absence of Sec. Stanton . Authorization for Peter H. Watson, 7 April 1863, CW, 6:165.

At Gen. Sickles' headquarters for review of troops President receives kiss from Princess Salm-Salm, whose husband is colonel with New York regiment. Philippe Régis D. Trobriand, Four Years with the Army of the Potomac (Boston: Ticknor, 1889), 427; N.Y. Tribune, 21 May 1899.

Wednesday, April 8, 1863.+-

Falmouth, VA.

During a visit to the Army of the Potomac's headquarters, President Lincoln "reviews . . . some sixty thousand men," representing four infantry corps. Journalist Noah Brooks accompanies Lincoln's party, and recalls, "[I]t was a splendid sight to witness their grand martial array as they wound over hills and rolling ground, coming from miles around . . . The President expressed himself as delighted with the appearance of the soldiery . . . It was noticeable that the President merely touched his hat in return salute to the officers, but uncovered to the men in the ranks." Noah Brooks, Washington in Lincoln's Time (New York: Rinehart & Company, 1958), 51-55; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 10 April 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Telegraphs Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles that Richmond papers report: 1. "'Important movements are taking place here; but for military reasons no particulars can yet be telegraphed;'" 2. "'On yesterday morning eight Monitors and ironclads were off the bar at Charleston. . . . May Heaven shield Charleston from all the rage of her enemies and ours.' " Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 8 April 1863, CW, 6:165-66.

Thursday, April 9, 1863.+-

Falmouth, VA.

President reviews I, VII, and IX Corps at noon. Brooks, Washington, 50; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 10 April 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Telegraphs Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles editorial from Richmond Whig regarding military situation at Charleston. Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 9 April 1863, CW, 6:166-67.

Friday, April 10, 1863.+-

Falmouth, VA, Aquia Creek, VA, and Washington, DC.

President reviews XI and XII Corps and visits Gen. Oliver O. Howard's headquarters before leaving for Aquia Creek. Brooks, Washington, 51; National Intelligencer, 14 April 1863; Oliver O. Howard, "Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln," Century Magazine 75 (1908):875.

Invites Generals Sickles and Schurz to accompany party to Washington. Noah Brooks, "Personal Reminiscences of Lincoln," Scribner's Monthly 15 (1877/1878):674.

Leaves Aquia Creek on board Carrie Martin in afternoon and arrives home about midnight. National Intelligencer, 11 April 1863; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 11 April 1863, 3d ed., 2:1.

Saturday, April 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President calls morning meeting of Secretaries Welles, Seward, Chase, Stanton, Assistant Secretary Fox, and General Halleck to discuss general military situation. Welles, Diary; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 11 April 1863, 3d ed., 2:1.

Group which returned from General Hooker's headquarters together has dinner with President at White House. General Schurz converses privately with Lincoln, who thinks Schurz cannot "forget that he is an adopted citizen of the country." Noah Brooks, "Personal Reminiscences of Lincoln," Scribner's Monthly 15 (1877/1878):674.

President refuses request of Schurz to have his division separated from Army of Potomac. Abraham Lincoln to Carl Schurz, 11 April 1863, CW, 6:168.

In evening, President Lincoln attends the Washington Theatre to watch British burlesque actress Matilda Vining Wood portray Pocahontas. A newspaper reports, "President Lincoln was present and laughed some." A critic once wrote, "Mrs. Wood is one of the few artists to whom it is impossible to be indifferent. The moment her voice is heard from the wing, the ear is attent, and when her saucy face appears, all eyes are . . . watchful lest they miss the comical, or impudent, or ludicrous, or mock-heroic byplay, which radiates over her features." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 13 April 1863, 1:4, 2:1; Barnard Hewitt, "Mrs. John Wood and the Lost Art of Burlesque Acting," Educational Theatre Journal 13, no. 2 (May 1961): 82-85.

[Irwin withdraws $9 from Springfield Marine Bank, semiannual payment of interest on scholarship at Illinois State University. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]

Sunday, April 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln invites Dr. Henry to White House for breakfast. Anson G. Henry to wife, 12 April 1863, Anson G. Henry Papers, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, Springfield, IL.

President and Sec. Stanton visit Navy Dept. about noon for report on naval action at Charleston. Between 2 and 3 P.M. Sec. Welles receives word of Rear Adm. Du Pont's failure to capture Charleston and goes immediately to White House with news. Welles, Diary.

Lincoln acknowledges receipt of Gen. Hooker's letter by hand of Gen. Daniel Butterfield. Hooker proposes to cross Rappahannock and move against enemy as soon as cavalry gets between Richmond and enemy to block his retreat. Cavalry marches on 13th. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 12 April 1863, CW, 6:169.

Monday, April 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President congratulates Frederic, Grand Duke of Baden, on marriage of Prince William of Baden. Abraham Lincoln to Frederic, Grand Duke of Baden, 13 April 1863, CW, 6:170-71.

Orders Rear Adm. Du Pont to hold his position inside bar near Charleston. Abraham Lincoln to Samuel F. Du Pont, 13 April 1863, CW, 6:170.

In conversation with Sen. Sumner (Mass.), seems more hopeful for outcome of expedition to Charleston. Pierce, Sumner Memoir and Letters, 4:133.

Tuesday, April 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln explains to former Cong. Bouligny (La.) why promised appointment as surveyor of Port of New Orleans was not confirmed. Abraham Lincoln to John E. Bouligny, 14 April 1863, CW, 6:172-73.

Orders Gen. Hunter and Rear Adm. Du Pont to keep up demonstration against Charleston "for a time." Abraham Lincoln to David Hunter and Samuel F. Du Pont, 14 April 1863, CW, 6:173-74.

Telegraphs Gen. Hooker: "Would like to have a letter from you as soon as convenient." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 14 April 1863, CW, 6:173.

Wednesday, April 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Mayor Wallach (Washington) and committee from school board of Washington confer with President on granting scholarships to service academies to students in public schools of that city. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 16 April 1863, 2d ed., 3:1.

President calls Senator Charles Sumner (Mass.) to White House for conference on resolution regarding slavery that might shape English public opinion in favor of U.S. Government. Resolution on Slavery, [15 April 1863], CW, 6:176-77.

Sends note: "Hon. Sec. of Treasury, please give Louis [Bargdorf, doorkeeper at White House], whom you know, an audience of a few minutes." Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 15 April 1863, CW, 6:175.

Expresses uneasiness over progress of cavalry under General Stoneman: "I do not know that any better can be done, but I greatly fear it is another failure already." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 15 April 1863, CW, 6:175-76.

Thursday, April 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President cancels contract with B. Kock "for immigration of persons of African extraction to a dependency of the Republic of Hayti." Proclamation Cancelling Contract with Bernard Koch, 16 April 1863, CW, 6:178-79.

Mil. Gov. Johnson introduces Judge John S. Brien of Nashville to President. Andrew Johnson to Abraham Lincoln, 17 April 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

John Hay writes from Hilton Head, S.C., regarding attitude of Gen. Hunter and Rear Adm. Du Pont toward President's order of 13th. Hay is on assignment to deliver Sec. Welles' order of April 2, 1863. Abraham Lincoln to David Hunter and Samuel F. Du Pont, 14 April 1863, CW, 6:173-74.

Lincoln writes memorandum concerning patronage in St. Louis. Editor of Missouri "Democrat" appointed postmaster. Party divides into factions. "I have stoutly tried to keep out of the quarrel, and so mean to do." Memorandum Concerning Patronage in St. Louis, Missouri, 16 April 1863, CW, 6:178.

Friday, April 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

Saturday, April 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President authorizes Assistant Secretary Harrington to discharge duties of secretary of treasury in absence of Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase. Appointment of George Harrington, 18 April 1863, CW, 6:179-80.

Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles discusses with President letter he wrote to Secretary of State William H. Seward on handling mails. Welles, Diary.

Surrenders confiscated mails to President under protest. Monaghan, Diplomat, 304.

President recognizes Johannes Schumacher as consul of Free Hanse City of Bremen at Boston. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 22 April 1863, 2d ed., 1:3.

General Heintzelman, with wife and daughter, spends evening at White House with Mrs. Lincoln, who tells Mrs. Heintzelman that Charles Heintzelman will go to West Point. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sunday, April 19, 1863.+-

En route to Aquia Creek, VA and Washington, DC.

"The President and Halleck went down to the Army very privately yesterday leaving here before daylight, and returning the same night." "Castine" [Noah Brooks], Washington, April 20, 1863, in Sacramento Union, May 18, 1863. "The President and the Secretary of War went off on a reconnaissance yesterday, I suppose to Aquia Creek, but returned in the evening. What they did or saw has not transpired." Nicolay to Hay, 20 April 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Monday, April 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President promises Mrs. James E. Dunawin that application for pardon of husband will have attention of attorney general. Abraham Lincoln to Edward Bates, 20 April 1863, CW, 6:180.

Issues proclamation admitting West Virginia into Union. Proclamation Admitting West Virginia into the Union, 20 April 1863, CW, 6:181; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 21 April 1863, 2d ed., 2:3.

Delphy Carlin, of St. Louis, sees President and asks that son be so employed as to avoid facing in battle his brother in Confederate army. Carlin to Lincoln, 21 April 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President Lincoln gives a "full and unconditional pardon" to John Cunningham, who is serving eight years in prison after a Washington, D. C. court "convicted [him] on two indictments for assault with intent to kill." Lincoln notes that Cunningham "was but eighteen" when he committed the crime, and "his widowed mother is in distress for want of his supporting care." Further, "the inspectors of the penitentiary, the Mayor of Washington, and other citizens have petitioned me in his behalf." Pardon of John Cunningham, 20 April 1863, The Lincoln Museum, Ft. Wayne, IN.

Tuesday, April 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets. "Only some light matters came before" it. Welles, Diary.

President sends congratulations to Frederic VII, King of Denmark, on marriage to Princess Alexandra to Prince of Wales. Abraham Lincoln to Frederic VII, 21 April 1863, CW, 6:182-83.

Ask Secs. Seward and Welles for information to help decide practical question of proper disposition of government mail of a neutral power found on board vessel captured by belligerent power. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward and Gideon Welles, 21 April 1863, CW, 6:183-84.

Wednesday, April 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Edward Stanly, former military governor of North Carolina, interviews President on behalf of Gen. Foster. Memorandum Concerning John G. Foster, 22 April 1863, CW, 6:184.

[Irwin withdraws $2,000 from Springfield Marine Bank, loan to himself. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]

Lincoln writes to fellow Republican, Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, on behalf of Mary Lincoln. Lincoln explains, "Mrs. L. is embarrassed a little. She would be pleased to have your company again this evening, at the Opera, but she fears she may be taxing you. I have undertaken to clear up the little difficulty. If, for any reason, it will tax you, decline, without any hesitation; but if it will not, consider yourself already invited, and drop me a note." Abraham Lincoln to Charles Sumner, 22 April 1863, CW, 6:185.

Answers inquiry of Gen. Rosecrans at Murfreesboro, Tenn.: "I really can not say that I have heard any complaints of you." Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 22 [23] April 1863, CW, 6:186.

Thursday, April 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President allegedly attends spiritualist seance in White House. Nothing happens until Lincoln leaves. Then spirits pinch Sec. Stanton 's ears and tweak Sec. Welles' beard. Elizabeth Lindsey, "Observance of the Lincoln Centennial," Lincoln Herald 59 (Fall 1957):14.

President commutes one, and approves another, of two sentences to shoot soldiers for desertion. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 23 April 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Commends former Cong. Segar (Va.) for showing interest in section of Emancipation Proclamation pertaining to "Eastern Shore of Virginia." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Segar, 23 April 1863, CW, 6:186-87.

Friday, April 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

Saturday, April 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Francis L. Capen, "Certified Practical Meteorologist & Expert in Computing the Changes of the Weather," interviews Lincoln for job as weather consultant for War Dept. Memorandum Concerning Francis L. Capen's Weather Forecasts, 28 April 1863, CW, 6:190-91.

Sunday, April 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President at Navy Bureau of Ordnance in morning talks to Rear Adm. Dahlgren and reads late telegrams. Extracts from Dahlgren Diary, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Monday, April 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Gov. Thomas Carney (Kans.) sees President, requests removal of Col. James M. Williams, and complains of interference by Gen. James G. Blunt in election at Leavenworth, Kans. Abraham Lincoln to James H. Lane, 27 April 1863, CW, 6:188.

Sec. Welles delivers his letter on subject of captured mails to President. Welles, Diary.

At 3:30 P.M. Lincoln telegraphs Gen. Hooker: "How does it look now?" Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 27 April 1863, CW, 6:188.

Tuesday, April 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President reassures Gov. Curtin (Pa.): "I do not think the people of Pennsylvania should be uneasy about an invasion." Abraham Lincoln to Andrew G. Curtin, 28 April 1863, CW, 6:189.

Cabinet meets. President engaged in selecting provost marshals. Welles, Diary.

President Lincoln annotates a letter from Francis Capen, who claims to be a "Certified Practical Meteorologist—& Expert in Computing the Changes of the Weather." Capen assures that his weather-forecasting talent will benefit the War Department. Lincoln writes, "It seems . . . Mr. Capen knows nothing about the weather, in advance. He told me three days ago that it would not rain again till the 30th. of April or 1st. of May. It is raining now & has been for ten hours. I can not spare any more time to Mr. Capen." Francis L. Capen to Abraham Lincoln, 25 April 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Memorandum Concerning Francis L. Capen's Weather Forecasts, 28 April 1863, CW, 6:190-91.

Lincoln visits Navy Ordnance Bureau to settle claim of Horatio Ames of Connecticut regarding contract for big guns. Bruce, Tools of War, 236-37.

Wednesday, April 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President requests former Gov. Newell (N.J.) to adjust trouble about provost marshal or come to Washington. Abraham Lincoln to William A. Newell, 29 April 1863, CW, 6:191.

President Lincoln writes to the commanding officer at Fort Randall, Dakota Territory, and requests consideration for John B. S. Todd, who is related to Lincoln's wife, Mary. After recently completing a term as delegate in Congress, Todd prepares to return to the Dakota Territory. Lincoln directs, "[G]ive him & his family such protection as you properly can in the event it becomes necessary. You will also afford them such facilities for crossing & recrossing the river there as are usually employed." Abraham Lincoln to Commanding Officer at Fort Randall, Dakota Territory, 29 April 1863, Inserted in John Fiske, The Presidents of America, Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, MA.

Thursday, April 30, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln is notified that he has been made life member of Chicago Young Men's Christian Association, someone having contributed $100 on his behalf. Jacobs to Lincoln, 30 April 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Writes Gen. Hunter to restore Capt. David Schaadt, Co. D, 176th Pennsylvania Regiment, if there is no evidence but his refusal to sanction resolution endorsing Emancipation Proclamation. Abraham Lincoln to David Hunter, 30 April 1863, CW, 6:191-92.

Friday, May 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

President dominates supervision of Army of Potomac. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Believes enemy in no position to invade Pennsylvania and so informs Gov. Curtin (Pa.). Abraham Lincoln to Andrew G. Curtin, 1 May 1863, CW, 6:193.

Saturday, May 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cong. Davis (Md.) interviews President regarding article in Baltimore "American" on Rear Adm. Du Pont's unsuccessful attack on Charleston. Davis to Lincoln, 4 May 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

During past week gentleman called on President and asked for pass to Richmond. "Well," said President, "I would be very happy to oblige you, if my passes were respected; but the fact is, sir, I have, within the past two years given passes to 250,000 men to go to Richmond, and not one has got there yet." Washington Chronicle, 2 May 1863.

Lincoln writes Gov. Curtin (Pa.) that Gen. Schenck says the enemy menacing Pennsylvania will have to fight or run today. "I really do not yet see the justification for incurring the trouble and expense of calling out the militia. I shall keep watch and try to do my duty." Abraham Lincoln to Andrew G. Curtin, 2 May 1863, CW, 6:195.

Sunday, May 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

During Battle of Chancellorsville President telegraphs Gen. Butterfield: "Where is Gen. Hooker? Where is [Gen. John] Sedgwick? where is Stoneman?" Abraham Lincoln to Daniel Butterfield, 3 May 1863, CW, 6:196.

In afternoon Lincoln meets with Sec. Stanton and Gens. Halleck and Heintzelman at War Dept. They are alarmed about Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln at telegraph office with Asst. Sec. Fox in evening until 11 P.M. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

"We [President and associates] know very little about what has been accomplished." Nicolay to Bates, 3 May 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Monday, May 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sec. Welles meets President in afternoon at War Dept. where they await news from Chancellorsville, Va. Welles, Diary.

"We [includes President] have been in a terrible suspense here for two days as the result of a battle which Joe Hooker is fighting on the Rappahannock." Nicolay to Bates, 4 May 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln telegraphs Hooker 3:10 P.M.: "We have news here that the enemy has reoccupied heights above Fredericksburg. Is that so?" Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 4 May 1863, CW, 6:196.

Tuesday, May 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets. President reads telegram from Gen. Hooker admitting that Confederates hold works on heights of Fredericksburg, Va. Little else of importance. Welles, Diary.

In afternoon Sen. Sumner (Mass.) and Sec. Welles at Navy Dept. discuss army under Hooker. President arrives at department and joins discussion. Welles, Diary.

Receives April salary warrant for $2,022.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.

Wednesday, May 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC and Falmouth, VA.

President sends for Asst. Sec. Fox before breakfast. Asks him to take Richmond newspapers to Gen. Hooker's headquarters. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

9:40 A.M. Lincoln telegraphs Hooker: "God bless you, and all with you. I know you will do your best." 11:40 A.M. Lincoln to Hooker: "We have, through Gen. Dix, the contents of Richmond papers of the fifth (5th). Gen. Dix's despatch in full, is going to you by Capt. Fox of the Navy." 12:30 P.M. Lincoln to Hooker: "Just as I had telegraphed you contents of Richmond papers, showing that our cavalry has not failed, I received General Butterfield's of 11 a.m. yesterday. This, with the great rain of yesterday and last night, securing your right flank, I think puts a new face upon your case; but you must be the judge." 4:30 P.M. Hooker to Lincoln: "Have this moment returned to camp. On my way received your telegrams of 11 a.m. and 12.30. The army had previously recrossed the river, and was on its return to camp. . . . I saw no way of giving the enemy a general battle with the prospect of success." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 6 May 1863, CW, 6:198-99; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 6 May 1863, CW, 6:199; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 6 May 1863, CW, 6:199-200.

About 3 P.M. President receives news from Chancellorsville, Va., and leaves at 4 P.M. for army, taking Gen. Halleck with him. Brooks, Washington, 56.

Sen. Sumner (Mass.) visits White House and President informs him of defeat at Chancellorsville. Welles, Diary.

Thursday, May 7, 1863.+-

Falmouth, VA and Washington, DC.

President and Gen. Halleck spend day with Gen. Hooker and Army of Potomac. Washington Chronicle, 8 May 1863.

Telegraphs Sec. Stanton : "Have you any news? and if any what is it? I expect to be up to-night." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 7 May 1863, CW, 6:201.

Lincoln back in Washington tonight from visit to Army of Potomac. Thinks "troops are none the worse for the campaign." Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; "Castine" [Noah Brooks], Washington, 8 May 1863, in Sacramento Union, 5 June 1863.

Mrs. Blair and friends visit Mrs. Lincoln. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President writes Hooker: "The recent movement of your army is ended without effecting its object. . . . What next? Have you already in your mind a plan wholly, or partially formed? If you have, prosecute it without interference from me. If you have not, please inform me, so that I, incompetent as I may be, can try [to] assist in the formation of some plan for the Army." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 7 May 1863, CW, 6:201.

Friday, May 8, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President by proclamation orders that no plea of alienage be allowed to exempt from military service any person who has declared his intention to become citizen of U.S. Proclamation Concerning Aliens, 8 May 1863, CW, 6:203-4.

President Lincoln writes to Commander of the Army of the Potomac Major General Joseph Hooker regarding the General's recent defeat at Chancellorsville, Virginia. Earlier in the day, Lincoln met with Brigadier General August Willich, whom the Confederates released from Richmond, Virginia's Libby Prison. Lincoln explains,"[Willich] was there when our cavalry cut the roads in that vicinity. He says there was not a sound pair [of] legs in Richmond, and that our men, had they known it, could have safely gone in and burnt every thing & brought us Jeff. Davis." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 8 May 1863, CW, 6:202-3.

Orders U.S. marshal for northern district of California to deliver New Almaden mining property to Leonard Swett, agent for U.S. Abraham Lincoln to Charles W. Rand, 8 May 1863, CW, 6:205-6.

Requests Asst. Sec. Watson to act upon case of Peckham's patent rifles and self-loading cartridges. Abraham Lincoln to Peter H. Watson, 8 May 1863, CW, 6:206.

At cabinet meeting Sec. Welles reports capture of Grand Gulf, Miss., by Acting Rear Adm. Porter. Welles, Diary.

Inscribes Bible "For Charles W. Merrill of 19th Massachusetts." CW, 8:515.

Saturday, May 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews Gen. Sigel regarding assignment. N.Y. Herald, 10 May 1863.

Receives report of Capt. Diller that 1,000 pounds of new gunpowder is ready for trial at Frankford Arsenal, Pa. Diller report to Lincoln, 31 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Walks to Treasury Park with Sec. Stanton to watch demonstration of liquid fire by A. Berney. Bruce, Tools of War, 238.

Directs Gen. Dix: "It is very important for Hooker to know exactly what damage is done to the Railroads, at all points between Fredericksburg and Richmond. . . . Please ascertain fully what was done, & what is the present condition, as near as you can, and advise me at once." Abraham Lincoln to John A. Dix, 9 May 1863, CW, 6:207.

Sunday, May 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President announces provost marshals for Maryland appointed under act of March 3, 1863. Washington Chronicle, 20 May 1863.

Monday, May 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives "first offer of resignation" from Sec. Chase. Donald, Chase Diaries, 30.

Again concludes to relieve Gen. Curtis of command at St. Louis. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 11 May 1863, CW, 6:210-11.

At 12 M. receives Lord Lyons with announcement of marriage of Prince of Wales. Seward to Lincoln, 8 May 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Requests Sec. Welles to call at White House and read two dispatches regarding naval matters written by Sec. Seward to Lord Lyons. Welles, Diary.

Inquires of Gen. Dix: "Do the Richmond papers have anything about Grand Gulf or Vicksburg?" Abraham Lincoln to John A. Dix, 11 May 1863, CW, 6:210.

Tuesday, May 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Dr. John Swinburne of New York and assistant, J. T. Gillett, call on President and volunteer services to Army of Potomac. Abraham Lincoln to Horatio Seymour, 12 May 1863, CW, 6:211.

President receives from Gen. Hooker's staff confirmation of Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson's death on May 10, 1863. Washington Chronicle, 13 May 1863.

Wednesday, May 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln offers "my sincere sympathy and condolence" to Peruvian nation on death of President Miguel San Roman. Abraham Lincoln to Pedro Diez Canseco, 13 May 1863, CW, 6:212-13.

President Lincoln writes to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton about Clement Vallandigham, of Ohio. On May 5, Major General Ambrose Burnside arrested Vallandigham on a charge of treason. Lincoln ponders the government's next move. The Secretary of State William Seward and the Secretary of the Treasury Salmon Chase "think we better not issue the special suspension of the Writ of Habeas Corpus spoken of." Chase believes that neither of the two federal judges who may hear the case will "issue" the writ because they had "refused a similar application last year." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 13 May 1863, CW, 6:215.

Lincoln writes Gen. Hooker: "If it will not interfere with the service, nor personally incommode you, please come up and see me this evening." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 13 May 1863, CW, 6:215.

Hooker at White House in evening on invitation of President. Hooker to Lincoln, 13 May 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln writes Sec. Chase: "I understand there are, or have been, some charges against Lieutenant [James H.] Merryman [of Revenue Service], of which I know nothing. I only wish to say, he was raised from childhood in the town where I lived, and I remember nothing against him as boy or man. His father [Dr. Elias H. Merryman, involved with Lincoln in his imbroglio with Shields. See Sept. 19, 1842.], now dead, was a very intimate acquaintance and friend of mine." Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 13 May 1863, CW, 6:214.

Telegraphs Gen. Totten: "I wish to appoint William Whipple, son of the General who fell in the recent battle on the Rappahannock, to West-Point, next Spring, and I wish to file this with you as a remembrance upon the subject." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph G. Totten, 13 May 1863, CW, 6:216.

Thursday, May 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to Major General Joseph Hooker about military strategy. Due to the fact that the Confederate forces "hav[e] re-established . . . communications, regained . . . positions and . . . received re-inforcements," Lincoln surmises, "it does not now appear probable to me that you can gain any thing by an early renewal of the attempt to cross the Rappahannock [River]." Lincoln also confides, "I must tell you I have some painful intimations that some of your corps and Division Commanders are not giving you their entire confidence. This would be ruinous, if true." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 14 May 1863, CW, 6:217-18.

Friday, May 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President visits Sec. Welles to discuss Lord Lyons' dispatch concerning confiscated mails. Welles, Diary.

Announces renewal of Saturday concerts of Marine band on White House grounds. Washington Chronicle, 15 May 1863.

"The President has been closeted for two hours today with Gen. Sickles, Commander of the Third army corps." N.Y. Herald, 16 May 1863.

Receives deputation from Union League of Philadelphia and accepts invitation to attend exercises commemorating anniversary of American Independence on July 4, 1863. Washington Chronicle, 18 May 1863.

[Irwin deposits $75 in Springfield Marine Bank, interest on Cline note. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165.]

President addresses letter to H. T. Blow, Charles D. Drake, and others at St. Louis: "It is very painful to me that you in Missouri can not, or will not, settle your factional quarrel among yourselves. I have been tormented with it beyond endurance for months, by both sides. Neither side pays the least respect to my appeals to your reason. I am now compelled to take hold of the case." Abraham Lincoln to Henry T. Blow, Charles D. Drake and Others, 15 May 1863, CW, 6:218.

Saturday, May 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President, accompanied by Secs. Seward and Stanton , leaves Navy Yard about 11 A.M. for trip down Potomac to inspect troop transports. Extracts from Dahlgren Diary, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Directs secretary of war to instruct Gen. Burnside to parole Maj. Clarence Prentice (CSA), rebel prisoner in Camp Chase, Ohio, "to remain outside the limits of both the loyal and disloyal States, or so-called 'Confederate States' of the United States of America, during the present rebellion." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 16 May 1863, CW, 6:219-20.

Sunday, May 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President drives to office of Rear Adm. Dahlgren at Navy Yard; later Dahlgren returns to town with him. Extracts from Dahlgren Diary, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Cong. George S. Boutwell (Mass.) meets President on White House steps and goes upstairs with him to locate on map Gen. Grant's position in rear of Vicksburg, Miss., after crossing Black River today. George S. Boutwell, Reminiscences of Sixty Years in Public Affairs, 2 vols. (New York: McClure, Phillips, 1902), 2:307.

Lincoln declares Judge H. H. Leavitt's denial of motion for habeas corpus in Vallandigham case is equal to three victories in field. [Writ denied May 16, 1863.] Harper, Press, 243.

Monday, May 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President congratulates Victoria, Queen of United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, on marriage of Prince of Wales. Abraham Lincoln to Queen Victoria, 18 May 1863, CW, 6:222.

Sec. Chase tells Lincoln that Abrahm Hiatt's commission will go forward. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin D. Morgan, 20 May 1863, CW, 6:224.

Tuesday, May 19, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President proclaims convention with Peru whereby settlement will be made on two captured ships. Washington Chronicle, 29 May 1863.

Wednesday, May 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President pardons Albert Horn, convicted upon charge of fitting out vessel to engage in slave trade. Washington Chronicle, 21 May 1863.

Thursday, May 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President withholds permission for Col. James F. Jaquess, 73d Illinois Regiment and Methodist minister, to visit Washington. Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 21 May 1863, CW, 6:225.

Calls upon Sec. Welles with protest that American vessels are annoying neutral shipping off coast of Cuba. Welles, Diary.

Committee with petition on behalf of Gen. C. S. Hamilton, signed by 23 senators and 84 representatives, waits upon President. Official Records—Armies 1, XI, pt. 3, 185.

Friday, May 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

In the afternoon, President Lincoln is in the East Room of the White House, where he meets with "20 or 30 one-legged soldiers." Chaplain J. C. Richmond accompanies the St. Elizabeth's Hospital veterans, and he notes, "These maimed heroes, sir, are eloquent without uttering a word. The limbs that are absent speak more loudly than the arms and legs that are here." A newspaper reports, "The President shook hands with all of them, calling them 'my boys,' and congratulating them on their brave and noble deeds." Remarks to "The One-Legged Brigade", 22 May 1863, CW, 6:226-27; Daily National Intelligencer (Washington, D.C.), 25 May 1863, 1:6; Chicago Daily Tribune (IL), 23 May 1863, 1:2.

President Lincoln writes to commanding officer for the District of Memphis Major General Stephen A. Hurlbut, and reports on what he is reading in the "Richmond [Virginia] newspapers" about the battles taking place near Vicksburg, Mississippi. Confederate Generals John C. Pemberton, William W. Loring, and Joseph E. Johnston, whom Lincoln mistakenly refers to as "Johnson," are trying to defend Vicksburg against Union General Ulysses S. Grant's attacks. Lincoln writes, "Grant beat Pemberton & Loring near Edwards' Station, at the end of a nine hours fight, driving Pemberton over the Big Black [Bridge] & cutting Loring off, & driving him South to Chrystal-Springs...Joe Johnson telegraphed all this, except about Loring, from his camp between Brownsville & Lexington, on the 18th." Abraham Lincoln to Stephen A. Hurlbut, 22 May 1863, CW, 6:226.

Saturday, May 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President in conference at War Dept. with Secs. Stanton and Welles, Asst. Sec. Fox, and Gen. Halleck regarding attack on Charleston. Welles, Diary.

Authorizes Stanton to confer with W. Butler, former state treasurer of Illinois, "and see if something definite can not be done in the case" of state claims against Illinois Central Railroad, and claims of railroad against U.S. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 23 May 1863, CW, 6:227-28.

Sunday, May 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

J. R. Gilmore reports to President on recent trip to Gen. Rosecrans' headquarters in Murfreesboro, Tenn. Trip made at behest of Horace Greeley to measure Rosecrans' fitness to succeed Lincoln as President. James R. Gilmore, Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War (Boston: Page, 1898), 148.

President Lincoln and Republican U.S. Senator James R. Doolittle, of Wisconsin, visit three Washington, D. C. hospitals. A newspaper reports, "The President expressed his gratification at the excellent condition of the hospitals and the comfortable condition of the patients. He shook hands with over one thousand soldiers, nearly all of whom were able to stand up. The soldiers seemed highly delighted as the President grasped them by the hand." New York Herald, 26 May 1863, 7:3.

Inquires of Col. Anson Stager about report of William G. Fuller at Memphis, Tenn., regarding capture of Vicksburg, Miss. "Did he know what he said, or did he say it without knowing it? Your despatch of this afternoon throws doubt upon it." Abraham Lincoln to Anson Stager, 24 May 1863, CW, 6:228-29.

Monday, May 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President visits number of hospitals in and around city. Washington Chronicle, 27 May 1863.

Tuesday, May 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to Illinois Congressman Isaac N. Arnold, who had criticized General Halleck Henry W. Halleck, who oversees the Union military. Arnold claimed that the public had "lost . . . confidence" in Halleck, and many believed that Halleck's "hostility" caused other generals to leave "public service." Lincoln replies, "I am compelled to take a more impartial and unprejudiced view of things. Without claiming to be your superior, which I do not, my position enables me to understand my duty in all these matters better than you possibly can, and I hope you do not yet doubt my integrity." Isaac N. Arnold to Abraham Lincoln, 18 May 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C.; Abraham Lincoln to Isaac N. Arnold, 26 May 1863, CW, 6:230-31.

There seems to be a "kind of council of war" in session at White House. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Cabinet discusses release of man condemned as spy. Welles, Diary.

Wednesday, May 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to General John M. Schofield, whom he named commander of the Department of the Missouri, replacing General Samuel R. Curtis. Lincoln cites Missouri's "factional quarrel" that pits Curtis against Missouri Governor Hamilton R. Gamble. Lincoln explains, "After months of labor to reconcile the difficulty, it seemed to grow worse and worse until I felt it my duty to break it up some how; and as I could not remove Gov. Gamble, I had to remove Gen. Curtis." Lincoln advises, "[E]xercise your own judgment, and do right for the public interest. Let your military measures be strong enough to repel the invader and keep the peace, and not so strong as to unnecessarily harrass and persecute the people. It is a difficult role, and so much greater will be the honor if you perform it well." Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 27 May 1863, CW, 6:234.

Recognizes Christian Bars as consul of Netherlands for Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire. Washington Star, 29 May 1863.

Telegraphs Gen. Hooker: "Have you Richmond papers of this morning? If so, what news?" Asks Gen. Rosecrans: "Have you anything from Grant? Where is [Gen. Nathan B.] Forrest's [(CSA)] Head Quarters?" Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 27 May 1863, CW, 6:233; Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 27 May 1863, CW, 6:233.

Thursday, May 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sen. McDougall (Calif.) calls and asks that Maj. Kip may be made brigadier general. Memorandum: Appointment of Lawrence Kip, 28 May 1863, CW, 6:236.

President confers again with J. R. Gilmore and declines to give official countenance to Col. Jaquess' project to try to arrange a peace. James R. Gilmore, Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War (Boston: Page, 1898), 155-56.

Authorizes Gen. Rosecrans to give Jacquess furlough to go into Confederate territory to seek out members of Methodist Church and others opposed to war and to arrange terms for their return to allegiance which would be acceptable to government. Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 28 May 1863, CW, 6:236.

Friday, May 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Gen. Burnside expresses to President willingness to be relieved of command following arrest of former Cong. Vallandigham (Ohio) if interest of public service requires it. President supports Burnside. Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 29 May 1863, CW, 6:237.

Lincoln and Sec. Stanton visit Navy Yard to observe firing of Ferris gun. Bruce, Tools of War, 239-40.

Saturday, May 30, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At 10 o'clock in the morning, U.S. Senator Charles Sumner, of Massachusetts, introduces a "Committee from New-York" to President Lincoln. The Committee is "confident that a force of at least 10.000" black "citizens" would "volunteer for the Service" if they could have General John C. Fremont as their commanding officer. A newspaper reports, "The President declared that he would gladly receive into the service not ten thousand but ten times ten thousand colored troops; expressed his determination to protect all who enlisted, and said that he looked to them for essential service in finishing the war. He believed that the command of them afforded scope for the highest ambition, and he would with all his heart offer it to Gen. Fremont." Remarks to New York Committee, 30 May 1863, CW, 6:239; New York Daily Tribune, 1 June 1863, 4:6; New York City Citizens Committee to Abraham Lincoln, 28 May 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Discusses with Sen. Sumner (Mass.) problems of raising and organizing Negro troops in North. Abraham Lincoln to Charles Sumner, 1 June 1863, CW, 6:242-44.

Sunday, May 31, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln answers inquiry: "I esteem [former] Gov. Francis Thomas [Md.], as an able, and very true man." Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 31 May 1863, CW, 6:239.

Monday, June 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President confers with Sec. Stanton about enforcement of Gen. Burnside's Order No. 38 against seditious newspapers in Indiana. Harper, Press, 261.

Consults Sen. Sumner (Mass.) again on proposal to raise Negro troops. Abraham Lincoln to Charles Sumner, 1 June 1863, CW, 6:242-44.

Informs George F. Kelly, agent for California settlers having complaints against action of District Court of California involving land claims, that courts must decide land titles. Abraham Lincoln to William T. Otto, 1 June 1863, CW, 6:242.

Receives from Sec. Welles list of applicants for appointment to Naval Academy. Welles, Diary.

Directs Col. William H. Ludlow, agent for exchange of prisoners at Fortress Monroe, Va., to ascertain why A. D. Richardson and Junius Browne, correspondents of New York "Tribune," are detained at Richmond, and to "get them off if you can." Abraham Lincoln to William H. Ludlow, 1 June 1863, CW, 6:241.

Tuesday, June 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President replies to resolutions in support of administration adopted by General Assembly of Presbyterian Church. Reply to Members of the Presbyterian General Assembly, 2 June 1863, CW, 6:244-45; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 2 June 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Interviews Gen. John F. Reynolds about command of Army of Potomac. Edward J. Nichols, Toward Gettysburg: A Biography of General John F. Reynolds (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1958), 220.

Cabinet meets, discusses Vicksburg, Miss., campaign, and "confidence is expressed in Grant, but it seems that not enough was doing." Welles, Diary.

Lincoln telegraphs Grant at Vicksburg: "Are you in communication with Gen. Banks? Is he coming towards you, or going further off? Is there, or has there been any thing to hinder his coming directly to you by water from Alexandria?" Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 2 June 1863, CW, 6:244.

Wednesday, June 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

A. W. Thompson submits to President plan for organizing immigrants and Negroes into military units and employing them eight hours a day building railroads. Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 3 June 1863, CW, 6:246.

Thursday, June 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives complaints from Illinois political leaders against General Burnside's Order No. 38 and revokes suspension of Chicago Times circulation. Harper, Press, 261; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 4 June 1863, CW, 6:248.

President, accompanied by Mrs. Lincoln and party, attends recitation from Shakespeare at private residence near Chain Bridge. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Orders Gen. Hooker to suspend execution of sentences in cases of Enos Daily, Philip Margraff, and Carlos Harrington of 146th New York Volunteers. Situation seems to be that recruits enlisting for six months are required to serve three years. "It is notorious among New-Yorkers that a regular system of deceit was practiced by recruiting officers." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 4 June 1863, CW, 6:248.

Friday, June 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln discusses with Gen. Halleck telegram from Gen. Hooker concerning disposition of troops in opposition to Gen. R. E. Lee. U.S. Congress, Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, 3 vols., 38th Cong., 2d sess. (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1865), I, 249.

President Lincoln writes to Commander of the Army of the Potomac General Joseph Hooker, and offers a strategy to outmaneuver Confederate General Robert E. Lee: "In case you find Lee coming to the North of the Rappahannock [River], I would by no means cross to the South of it. . . . In one word, I would not take any risk of being entangled upon the river, like an ox jumped half over a fence, and liable to be torn by dogs, front and rear, without a fair chance to gore one way or kick the other." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 5 June 1863, CW, 6:249-51.

Reads paper prepared in reply to Cong. "Erastus Corning [N.Y.] & Others." Welles, Diary.

Interviews Cong. Fernando Wood (N.Y.). N.Y. Herald, 6 June 1863.

Receives May salary warrant for $2,022.34. [Irwin deposits $350 in Springfield Marine Bank, rent from L. A. Tilton. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182, 165.]

Saturday, June 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln sends anonymous letter to editor of Washington "Chronicle" to call attention to wrong information in article on Chicago "Times." Anonymous Letter to the Editor of the Washington Chronicle, 6 June 1863, CW, 6:251-52.

Mrs. Lincoln sends White House flowers to Mrs. Fox. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln informs Gen. Dix at Fortress Monroe, Va., of conditions at Vicksburg, Miss. While dispatches "show the siege progressing, they do not show any general fighting, since the 21st. and 22nd. We have nothing from Port-Hudson later than the 29th. when things looked reasonably well for us." Abraham Lincoln to John A. Dix, 6 June 1863, CW, 6:252.

Monday, June 8, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President instructs Sec. Welles to decide question of weekly performances of Marine band at White House. Welles, Diary.

Sec. Chase reads to Lincoln letter from Benjamin H. Brewster, prominent Philadelphia lawyer, on Pennsylvania political situation. Chase to Brewster, 9 June 1863, Simon Cameron Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President accompanies Mrs. Lincoln and Tad to 3 P.M. train for Philadelphia. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 9 June 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

President Lincoln writes to Major General Samuel R. Curtis following Lincoln's removal of Curtis as commander of the Department of the Missouri. Curtis repeatedly clashed with Missouri Governor Hamilton R. Gamble. Lincoln writes, "It became almost a matter of personal self-defence to somehow break up the state of things in Missouri. I did not mean to cast any censure upon you, nor to indorse any of the charges made against you by others. With me the presumption is still in your favor that you are honest, capable, faithful, and patriotic." Abraham Lincoln to Samuel R. Curtis, 8 June 1863, CW, 6:253-54.

Sends two dispatches to Gen. Dix: "We have despatches from Vicksburg of the 3rd. Siege progressing. No general fighting recently. All well." And: "The substance of the news sent of fight at Port-Hudson on the 27th. we have had here three or four days. . . . We knew that Gen. Sherman was wounded. . . . We still have nothing of that Richmond newspaper story of [Gen. Edmund] Kirby Smith [(CSA)] crossing & of Banks losing an arm." Abraham Lincoln to John A. Dix, 8 June 1863, CW, 6:254; Abraham Lincoln to John A. Dix, 8 June 1863, CW, 6:254.

Tuesday, June 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in Philadelphia: "Think you better put 'Tad's' pistol away. I had an ugly dream about him." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 9 June 1863, CW, 6:256.

Wednesday, June 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC and Alexandria, VA.

President forgets 12 M. appointment with Mr. Molina arranged by Secretary of State William H. Seward [probably Luis Molina, minister from Nicaragua]. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 10 June 1863, CW, 6:258.

Accompanied by Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, General Samuel P. Heintzelman, General John P. Slough, and staff, visits Alexandria, Va. Terrible explosion of a magazine there at Fort Lyon yesterday killed 22 soldiers and wounded 17 more. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 11 June 1863, 2d ed., 2:4; 3:2.

Replies to dispatch of Gen. Hooker: "If left to me, I would not go South of the Rappahannock, upon Lee's moving North of it. . . . I think Lee's Army, and not Richmond, is your true objective point." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 10 June 1863, CW, 6:257-58.

Thursday, June 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President congratulates Jesus Jimenez on election to presidency of Republic of Costa Rica. Abraham Lincoln to Jesus Jimenez, 11 June 1863, CW, 6:259-60.

Telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in Philadelphia: "Your three despatches received. I am very well; and am glad to know that you & 'Tad' are so." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 11 June 1863, CW, 6:260.

Confers with Gen. Halleck on movement of troops under Gen. Hooker. U.S. Congress, Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, 3 vols., 38th Cong., 2d sess. (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1865), I, 255.

Friday, June 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President replies to resolutions of public meeting held at Albany, N.Y., in letter to "Hon. Erastus Corning & Others." Differences exist in construing war powers of President under Constitution. Abraham Lincoln to Erastus Corning and Others, [12 June] 1863, CW, 6:260-69.

Notifies Gen. Hooker of plan to join him at 5 P.M. tomorrow for trial of incendiary shells. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 12 June 1863, CW, 6:270.

Visits Gen. Meigs' office to discuss Army of Potomac. Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Spends part of afternoon at War Dept. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Saturday, June 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President thanks Leopold I, King of the Belgians, for acting as arbiter in U.S.S. "Macedonian" case. Abraham Lincoln to Leopold, 13 June 1863, CW, 6:271-72.

At 1 P.M. President and Gen. Meigs board tug for trip to Army of Potomac. Gen. Hooker telegraphs to postpone visit. Tug turns back at Alexandria, Va., and reaches Washington at 3:30 P.M. Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 13 June 1863, CW, 6:271.

[Irwin deposits $754.60 in Springfield Marine Bank, payment of Cline note and interest. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165.]

Lincoln directs Sec. Welles: "Please allow the bearer, Mr. [Azel S.] Lyman, to take his new cannon into the Navy-Yard where I wish to see it fired next week." Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 13 June 1863, CW, 6:272.

Sunday, June 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At 5:50 p.m., President Lincoln telegraphs commander of the Army of the Potomac Major General Joseph Hooker regarding defensive strategies on Virginia battlefields. Lincoln writes, "So far as we can make out here, the enemy have [General Robert] Milroy surrounded at Winchester, and [General Robert] Tyler at Martinsburg. . . . If the head of Lee's army is at Martinsburg and the tail of it on the Plank road between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, the animal must be very slim somewhere. Could you not break him?" Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 14 June 1863, CW, 6:273.

Meeting in evening at War Dept. consists of President, Secs. Stanton and Welles, and Gen. Halleck. Lincoln is "trying to find out what Lee's army is up to." Welles, Diary; Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President authorizes secretary of treasury to "co-operate by the revenue cutters under your direction with the navy in arresting rebel depredations on American commerce and transportation and in capturing rebels engaged therein." Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 14 June 1863, CW, 6:272-73.

Replies to Hooker's dispatch inquiring if Winchester, Va., is surrounded: "I really fear—almost believe, it is. No communication has been had with it during the day, either at Martinsburg, or Harper's Ferry. . . . It is quite certain that a considerable force of the enemy is thereabout; and I fear it is an overwhelming one, compared with [Gen. Robert H.], Milroy[']s." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 14 June 1863, CW, 6:273-74.

Monday, June 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in Philadelphia: "Tolerably well. Have not rode out much yet, but have at last got new tires on the carriage wheels, & perhaps, shall ride out soon." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 15 June 1863, CW, 6:277.

Issues proclamation calling for 100,000 militia. Proclamation Calling for 100,000 Militia, 15 June 1863, CW, 6:277-78; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 15 June 1863, 2d ed., Extra, 2:1.

Interviews E. L. Baker about charges against N. W. Edwards, commissary, and William H. Bailhache, quartermaster at Springfield, Ill., of having used their positions to amass personal fortunes. Abraham Lincoln to Edward L. Baker, 15 June 1863, CW, 6:275-76.

Informs Gen. Hooker at Fairfax Station, Va.: "The facts are now known here that Winchester and Martinsburg were both besieged yesterday; the troops from Martinsburg have got into Harper's Ferry without loss; those from Winchester, are also in, having lost, in killed, wounded and missing, about one third of their number." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 15 June 1863, CW, 6:276-77.

Communicates with Gen. Daniel Tyler at Harper's Ferry, W. Va.: "It would be useful, if we could tell Hooker, about what number of the enemy is about Winchester and all North of it—also what troops they are. I will be obliged, if you will ascertain as nearly as you can, and inform me." Abraham Lincoln to Daniel Tyler, 15 June 1863, CW, 6:278.

Tuesday, June 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews district attorney in assault and battery case against John Knowles. Abraham Lincoln to Edward Bates, 16 June 1863, CW, 6:278-79.

Telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in Philadelphia: "It is a matter of choice with yourself whether you come home. There is no reason why you should not, that did not exist when you went away. As bearing on the question of your coming home, I do not think the raid in Pennsylvania amounts to anything at all." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 16 June 1863, CW, 6:283.

Interviews Gen. Cadwalader regarding assignment to command troops at Philadelphia for present emergency. Abraham Lincoln to Horace Binney, Jr., 16 June 1863, CW, 6:279.

At cabinet meeting Sec. Chase suggests that an attempt be made to capture Richmond, but Lincoln blocks idea. Welles, Diary.

President and Sec. Stanton at War Dept. in evening. Sec. Welles drops in and finds them jubilant over report that no Confederates have reached Carlisle, Pa. Welles, Diary, 17 June 1863.

Telegraphs Gen. Hooker: "Your idea to send your cavalry to this side of the river may be right—probably is; still, it pains me a little that it looks like defensive merely, and seems to abandon the fair chance now presented of breaking the enemy's long and necessarily slim line, stretched now from the Rappahannock to Pennsylvania." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 16 June 1863, CW, 6:280-81.

Sends letter to Hooker by hand of Capt. Ulric Dahlgren regarding lack of confidence Gen. Halleck displays toward Hooker. "You state the case much too strongly. . . . I believe Halleck is dissatisfied with you to this extent only, that he knows that you write and telegraph ('report' as he calls it) to me. . . . I need and must have the professional skill of both, and yet these suspicions tend to deprive me of both. . . . Now, all I ask is that you will be in such mood that we can get into our action the best cordial judgment of yourself and General Halleck, with my poor mite added, if indeed he and you shall think it entitled to any consideration at all." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 16 June 1863, CW, 6:281-82.

Wednesday, June 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President abstains from recommending Israel D. Andrews, former agent of U.S., for public employment. Memorandum about Israel D. Andrews, 17 June 1863, CW, 6:284-85.

President Lincoln receives foreign minister Henry Segur, of San Salvador. Segur expresses "sympathy felt by the President of Salvador for the cause of the American Union." A newspaper reports, "President Lincoln replied by saying he hoped the Minister's residence here would be agreeable, and his mission satisfactory, and said he was not uninformed of the devotion of Salvador to the principles of republicanism and the interests of civilization." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 18 June 1863, 2:4-5.

Replies to Gen. Hooker: "Mr. Eckert, Superintendent in the Telegraph Office, assures me that he has sent, and will send you everything, that comes to the office." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 17 June 1863, CW, 6:284.

Thursday, June 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President thanks Gen. A. Dingman, 15th Battalion Volunteers, Canada, for offer of battalion to defend Washington. Abraham Lincoln to A. Dingman, 18 June 1863, CW, 6:285.

Mitigates sentence of dismissal in case of Surg. Alfred Wynkoop to severe reprimand for indiscretion in communicating information re troop movements. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 June 1863, CW, 6:285-86.

Interviews Mr. Buckner who asks to be discharged from suit in scire facias. Abraham Lincoln to Joshua Tevis, 18 June 1863, CW, 6:286-87.

Friday, June 19, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President replies to committee appointed by planters of state of Louisiana regarding reorganization of state government. Abraham Lincoln to E. E. Malhiot, Bradish Johnson, and Thomas Cottman, 19 June 1863, CW, 6:287-89.

President Lincoln meets with Boston Mayor Frederick W. Lincoln, who represents a "commission" now in Washington "to consult the President with reference to the defenses of Boston." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 19 June 1863, 2:4.

Receives news that Rear Admiral Andrew H. Foote, suffering from incurable disease, is in critical condition. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 19 June 1863, 2d ed., Extra, 2:2, 4.

Instructs John Nicolay to inform Chicago Tribune that President will be glad to receive copies "so long as in your kindness you may please to send it." Nicolay to Tribune Company, 19 June 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Saturday, June 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives inquiry from Gen. Schofield asking whether government will sustain action of Missouri Constitutional Convention regarding gradual emancipation. Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 21 June 1863, CW, 6:289.

Sunday, June 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln prepares answer to Gen. Schofield's inquiry of yesterday. Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 21 June 1863, CW, 6:289.

Forwards report from Leesburg, Va., telegraph operator to Gen. Hooker: "Firing commenced about 7 this morning in direction from here of Aldie's Gap and Middleburg; has continued all day, . . . apparently now about White Plains." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 21 June 1863, CW, 6:289.

Monday, June 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President allots Assoc. Justice Stephen J. Field to 10th circuit of U.S. Circuit Court for Districts of California and Oregon. Assignment of Stephen J. Field, 22 June 1863, CW, 6:290.

Appoints Asst. Atty. Gen. Titian J. Coffey attorney general ad interim, in absence of Edward Bates. Bates, Diary, 23 June 1863.

Begins summer residence at Soldiers' Home. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 22 June 1863, 3d ed., Extra, 2:1; DNA—RG 217, General Accounting Office, 147-321.

Sends another Leesburg, Va., report to Gen. Hooker: "'I heard very little firing this a.m. about daylight, but it seems to have stopped now. It was in about the same direction as yesterday, but farther off.' " Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 22 June 1863, CW, 6:290.

President Lincoln writes to commander of the Department of the Missouri General John M. Schofield, who seeks clarification regarding the military's role as the state institutes an emancipation policy. Lincoln writes, "I have very earnestly urged the slave-states to adopt emancipation; and it ought to be, and is an object with me not to overthrow, or thwart what any of them may in good faith do, to that end. You are therefore authorized to act in the spirit of this letter, in conjunction with what may appear to be the military necessities of your Department." John M. Schofield to Abraham Lincoln, 20 June 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 22 June 1863, CW, 6:291.

Tuesday, June 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At request of Cong. Kelley (Pa.) President interviews Pvt. Wilton M. Herpert [Milton L. Hupert?] and sends him to Sec. Stanton . Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 23 June 1863, CW, 6:292.

Lincoln at cabinet meeting "sad and careworn." "Nothing of special interest was submitted." Welles, Diary.

President inquires of Maj. Stewart Van Vliet, quartermaster at New York: "Have you any idea what the news is, in the despatches of Gen. Banks to Gen. Halleck?" Abraham Lincoln to Stewart Van Vliet, 23 June 1863, CW, 6:292.

Wednesday, June 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sec. Seward introduces Lt. Theron B. Luckey, recently discharged from 143d New York Infantry. President sends him to Sec. Stanton . Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 24 June 1863, CW, 6:294.

Telegraphs Gen. Darius N. Couch at Harrisburg, Pa.: "Have you any reports of the enemy moving into Pennsylvania? and if any, what?" Abraham Lincoln to Darius N. Couch, 24 June 1863, CW, 6:293.

Thursday, June 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Delegation from Ohio State Democratic Convention visits President to present set of resolutions relating to civil liberties. Submits written resolutions following day. Abraham Lincoln to Matthew Birchard and Others, 29 June 1863, CW, 6:300-6.

Writes check to "Rev. Dr. [Phineas D.] Gurley (for church)" for $25.00. CW, 8:517.

Friday, June 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln commutes six death sentences pending in army. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:296; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:296; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:296; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:296-97; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:297; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:297.

"The President in a single remark today betrayed doubts of Hooker, to whom he is quite partial." Welles, Diary.

About 9 P.M. Col. Daniel T. Van Buren and Col. Silas W. Burt visit President at Soldiers' Home to tell him that Gov. Seymour (N.Y.) will stand behind him. Rufus R. Wilson, ed., Lincoln Among His Friends: A Sheaf of Intimate Memories (Caldwell, ID: Caxton Printers, 1942), 330.

Saturday, June 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President at conference in War Dept. agrees to relieve Gen. Hooker of command of Army of Potomac and replace him with Gen. George G. Meade. Randall, Lincoln, 2:274.

Telegraphs Hooker: "It did not come from the newspapers, nor did I believe it, but I wished to be entirely sure it was a falsehood." [This probably refers to rumor that Hooker was AWOL from army.] Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 27 June 1863, CW, 6:297-98.

Sunday, June 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At 10 A.M. cabinet meeting President reads reply to resolutions of Ohio Democratic State Convention regarding former Cong. Vallandigham (Ohio). Also reads Gen. Hooker's telegram offering to resign as commander of Army of Potomac. Sec. Welles believes that choice of Gen. Meade to succeed Hooker was made before meeting. Welles, Diary.

"Gen. Hooker has asked to be relieved and Gen. Meade succeeds him." Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln telegraphs Gen. Couch at Harrisburg, Pa.: "What news now? What are the enemy firing at four miles from your works?" Abraham Lincoln to Darius N. Couch, 28 June 1863, CW, 6:299.

Monday, June 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President answers propositions set forth in resolutions of Ohio Democratic State Convention, presented on June 26, 1863 by delegation headed by Matthew Birchard. Abraham Lincoln to Matthew Birchard and Others, 29 June 1863, CW, 6:300-6.

Refuses to permit former Cong. William Kellogg (Ill.) or his agent to trade in cotton and other products at Helena, Ark. Abraham Lincoln to William Kellogg, 29 June 1863, CW, 6:307.

Approves arrest of Gen. Milroy for loss of division at Winchester, Va. Abraham Lincoln to Robert H. Milroy, 29 June 1863, CW, 6:308-9.

President and Sec. Stanton agree to plan of Asst. Sec. Fox for Rear Adm. Foote and task force commanded by Gen. Dix to attempt capture of Richmond. Gen. Halleck vetoes plan. Gustavus V. Fox, Confidential Correspondence of Gustavus Vasa Fox, 2 vols. (New York: n.p., 1918), 2:259; Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Tuesday, June 30, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President in conference with Sec. Stanton and Gen. Halleck; misses cabinet meeting. Welles, Diary.

Cong. Kelley (Pa.) calls and requests that Gen. McClellan not be placed in command in Pennsylvania. Kelley to Lincoln, 30 June 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Gen. Butler at White House for interview with President. N.Y. Herald, 1 July 1863.

President receives invitation to use residence of J. C. G. Kennedy, 380 H St., at any time. Kennedy to Lincoln, 30 June 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Telegraphs Gen. Couch at 3:25 P.M.: "I judge by absence of news that the enemy is not crossing, or pressing up to the Susquehannah. Please tell me what you know of his movements." Abraham Lincoln to Darius N. Couch, 30 June 1863, CW, 6:310.

President Lincoln replies to General David Hunter, who is unhappy about being "remov[ed] from command of the Dept. of the South." Hunter wants permission to release "official . . . records as may be necessary to set me right in the eyes of my friends and in the justice of history." Lincoln writes, "I assure you . . . the recent change of commanders . . . was made for no reasons which convey any imputation upon your known energy, efficiency and patriotism. . . . I cannot, by giving my consent to a publication of whose details I know nothing, assume the responsibility of whatever you may write. In this matter your own sense of military propriety must be your guide, and the regulations of the service your rule of conduct." David Hunter to Abraham Lincoln, 25 June 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to David Hunter, 30 June 1863, CW, 6:310-11.

Answers A. K. McClure, who asserts that people are clamoring for Gen. McClellan to be placed in command in Pennsylvania: "Do we gain anything by opening one leak to stop another? Do we gain any thing by quieting one clamor, merely to open another, and probably a larger one?" Abraham Lincoln to Alexander K. McClure, 30 June 1863, CW, 6:311.

Acknowledges letter of Gov. Joel Parker (N.J.), who writes that people of New Jersey want McClellan at head of Army of Potomac: "I really think the attitude of the enemies' army in Pennsylvania, presents us the best opportunity we have had since the war began. I think you will not see the foe in New-Jersey. I beg you to be assured that no one out of my position can know so well as if he were in it, the difficulties and involvements of replacing Gen. McClellan in command." Abraham Lincoln to Joel Parker, 30 June 1863, CW, 6:311-12.

Wednesday, July 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President visits Sec. Stanton in reference to Surg. William D. Stewart, dismissed for being absent without leave. Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin B. French, 1 July 1863, CW, 6:312-13.

Thursday, July 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

In morning Sec. Welles finds Lincoln at War Dept. reading dispatches from Gen. Meade. Welles, Diary.

"Lincoln was in the telegraph office hour after hour during those anxious days and nights." Bates, Telegraph Office, 155.

Lincoln asks Sec. Stanton to pay advertising bill of "National Republican." It is "a source of trouble to me." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 2 July 1863, CW, 6:313.

Friday, July 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sec. Welles meets President and Sec. Seward at War Dept. during morning, examining dispatches from Gen. Meade. Welles, Diary.

Mrs. Lincoln receives head injury when thrown from carriage during drive to Soldiers' Home. Helm, Mary, 211-12.

President Lincoln telegraphs his son Robert, who attends Harvard University, regarding Robert's mother, Mary. Lincoln advises, "Dont be uneasy. Your mother very slightly hurt by her fall." The day prior, Mary Lincoln suffered injuries from a carriage accident. A newspaper reports, "Her horses took fright and ran away as she was riding from the Soldier's Home to the city. Seeing her imminent danger she leaped from the carriage, and was stunned and severely bruised, but no bones were broken. Surgeons from Mount Pleasant Hospital were promptly in attendance. She soon recovered sufficiently to be taken to the White House." Abraham Lincoln to Robert T. Lincoln, 3 July 1863, CW, 6:314; New York Times, 3 July 1863, 5:2.

Sends order to Gen. Burnside: "Private [John] Downey, of the Twentieth or Twenty-sixth Kentucky Infantry, is said to have been sentenced to be shot for desertion to-day. If so, respite the execution until I can see the record." Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 3 July 1863, CW, 6:313.

Saturday, July 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At 10 A.M. President issues press release announcing that "news from the Army of the Potomac, up to 10 P.M. of the 3rd. is such as to cover that Army with the highest honor." Announcement of News From Gettysburg, 4 July 1863, CW, 6:314.

Gen. Haupt rushes from Gettysburg and confers with Lincoln and Gen. Halleck on military matters. Flower, Stanton, 201.

Archimedes C. Dickson, Springfield (Ill.) friend known as "Dick," calls at White House as salesman to interest Lincoln in Absterdam projectile patterned after Dyer's rifle shell, "distinguished chiefly by a cup or sabot of soft metal at the base, which was supposed to expand and take the grooves like a Minié bullet." Bruce, Tools of War, 257-58.

Union League of Philadelphia presents gold medal to President. LL, No. 1188.

In evening Sec. Welles receives dispatch from Alexander H. Stephens, Vice President of Confederate States of America; shows it to President. Welles, Diary.

Mrs. Lincoln assists W. C. Stoddard in preparation of Fourth of July celebration in White House grounds. William O. Stoddard, Inside the White House in War Times (New York: C. L. Webster, 1890), 206-9.

President writes Acting Rear Adm. Samuel P. Lee (USN): "The request of A. H. Stephens is inadmissible. The customary agents and channels are adequate for all needful communication and conference between the United States forces and the insurgents." [In the absence of the original, it is not certain that Lincoln composed or signed this, and that it was prepared on July 4, 1863 may be questioned.] Abraham Lincoln to Samuel P. Lee, 4 July 1863, CW, 6:317.

Writes Gen. Schenck at Baltimore: "Your despatches about negro regiment are not uninteresting or unnoticed by us, but we have not been quite ready to respond. You will have an answer tomorrow." Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 4 July 1863, CW, 6:317.

Sunday, July 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

11 A.M. Principal discussion at cabinet meeting is request of A. H. Stephens for permission to proceed to Washington for interview with President. Welles, Diary.

In the afternoon, President Lincoln and his son, Tad, visit General Daniel E. Sickles, who is recovering in Washington. During the battle at Gettysburg on July 2, Sickles received a severe injury to his right leg prompting surgeons to remove the leg to a point "five inches above the knee." A newspaper reports, "[Lincoln, Tad,] and a mounted escort, rode on horseback to Gen. Sickles' door." Lincoln "congratulated him on his ability and courage, and expressed the greatest regret that [Sickles's] . . . wound . . . rendered amputation necessary." Washington Chronicle, 6 July 1863; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 6 July 1863, 3:2; New York Times, 6 July 1863, 4:5.

Monday, July 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Special cabinet meeting at 9 A.M. continues consideration of A. H. Stephens' mission and decides that he should communicate through prescribed military channels. Welles, Diary.

Lincoln leaves telegraph office in War Dept. and arrives at Soldiers' Home about 7 P.M. Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 6 July 1863, CW, 6:318.

Receives June salary warrant for $2,022.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.

Suggests to Gen. Halleck that he look to movements of Army of Potomac. Does Gen. Meade intend to cover Baltimore and Washington, and get enemy across river again without further collision, or does he plan to prevent his crossing and to destroy him? Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 6 July 1863, CW, 6:318.

Tuesday, July 7, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln at telegraph office in morning receives Gen. Grant's dispatch announcing capture of Vicksburg, Miss. Bates, Telegraph Office, 156; Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, [7 July 1863], CW, 6:319.

Vice President Hamlin and Senators from Maine confer with President and urge better New England coastal defense against piratical depredations of enemy. Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 7 July 1863, CW, 6:320-21.

At cabinet meeting President appears despondent because Gen. Meade has lingered at Gettysburg. At 12:40 P.M. Sec. Welles gives President telegram from Acting Rear Adm. David D. Porter [for retroactive promotion see December 8, 1863] announcing surrender of Vicksburg on July 4, 1863. Welles, Diary.

In evening, upon learning of the Union Army's victory at Vicksburg, Mississippi, "a procession with bands of music proceed[s] to the Executive Mansion." A newspaper reports, "a crowd enthusiastically cheered the President, [who] . . . appeared at an upper window." Lincoln remarks that it is fitting that the Vicksburg victory occurred on the "Fourth of July just passed," when defeat came to "those who opposed the declaration that all men are created equal." Lincoln "praise[s] . . . the many brave officers and soldiers who have fought in the cause of the Union." Response to a Serenade, 7 July 1863, CW, 6:319-20; New York Daily Tribune (NY), 8 July 1863, 5:3; The New York Times (NY), 8 July 1863, 8:1-2; Daily Morning Chronicle (Washington, D.C.), 8 July 1863, 2:2-3.

Wednesday, July 8, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President recognizes Heinrich Otto Sigmund Cuntz as consul of Grand Duchy of Oldenburg for state of Massachusetts and Henry Bream as vice consul of Denmark for New York, Connecticut, and parts of New Jersey. Washington Chronicle, 13 July 1863.

A few days after the Gettysburg, Pennsylvania battle, President Lincoln responds to a telegram that Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas sent to the Secretary of War Edwin Stanton regarding Union troops in pursuit of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's army. Lincoln writes, "The forces you speak of, will be of no immagineable service, if they can not go forward with a little more expedition." Lincoln explains that the troops must move quickly or they "will, in my unprofessional opinion, be quite as likely to capture the Man-in-the Moon, as any part of Lee's Army." Abraham Lincoln to Lorenzo Thomas, 8 July 1863, CW, 6:321-22.

Informs Frederick F. Low, collector of port of San Francisco, of Gen. Meade's victory at Gettysburg and Gen. Grant's victory at Vicksburg, Miss. Abraham Lincoln to Frederick F. Low, 8 July 1863, CW, 6:321.

Answers dispatch of U.S. District Attorney E. D. Smith (N.Y.): "Capture of Vicksburg confirmed by despatch from Gen. Grant himself." Abraham Lincoln to E. Delafield Smith, 8 July 1863, CW, 6:321.

Thursday, July 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President instructs Leonard Swett and F. F. Low to avoid riot in taking possession of New Almaden Quicksilver Mine in California. Abraham Lincoln to Leonard Swett and Frederick F. Low, 9 July 1863, CW, 6:322.

Pardons John McCleary, counterfeiter, and Victor La Waer, convicted of attempting to incite soldiers to desert. Washington Chronicle, 10 July 1863.

Friday, July 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At Soldiers' Home, President interviews A. C. Dickson, Orloff A. Zane, and John Absterdam regarding Absterdam shell. Bruce, Tools of War, 259.

Assures Gen. Sickles that no III Corps disaster has been reported. Abraham Lincoln to Daniel E. Sickles, 10 July 1863, CW, 6:322-23.

Saturday, July 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"The President seemed in specially good humor today, as he had pretty good evidence that the enemy were still on the north side of the Potomac, and Meade had announced his intention of attacking them in the morning." Hay, Letters and Diary.

President Lincoln writes to his friend Illinois State Auditor Jesse K. Dubois, of Springfield, Illinois. Dubois had telegraphed Lincoln seeking the outcome of the battle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Lincoln writes, "After three days fighting . . . [Confederate General Robert E.] Lee withdrew and made for the Potomac [River] . . . he found the river so swolen as to prevent his crossing . . . he is still this side near Hagerstown and Williamsport, preparing to defend himself . . . I am more than satisfied with what has happened North of the Potomac so far, and am anxious and hopeful for what is to come." Abraham Lincoln to Jesse K. Dubois, 11 July 1863, CW, 6:323.

Calls at Navy Ordnance Bureau and orders trial of Absterdam shell as soon as possible. Bruce, Tools of War, 259.

President Lincoln writes to New York Governor Horatio Seymour regarding the court martial of Captain John N. Riedenbach, of the 158th New York Volunteers. Lincoln writes, "The evidence shows a good deal of boistrous misconduct, during a single case of intoxication; and I incline to think he does not habitually get in that condition. But I have not the legal power . . . to restore him to his office, nor would I do it . . . without a better knowledge of his character . . . I write this merely to say that if the Governor of New-York shall choose to appoint him to the same or another Military office, the disability is hereby removed, enabling him to do so." Abraham Lincoln to Horatio Seymour, 11 July 1863, CW, 10:193.

Telegraphs Robert Lincoln: "Come to Washington." Abraham Lincoln to Robert T. Lincoln, 11 July 1863, CW, 6:323.

Inquires of Gen. Schenck: "How many rebel prisoners, captured within Maryland & Pennsylvania, have reached Baltimore within this month of July?" Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 11 July 1863, CW, 6:323-24.

Sunday, July 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln at telegraph office receives word of Gen. Meade's plan to attack tomorrow. Paces floor, wringing his hands and muttering, "Too late." Bates, Telegraph Office, 157.

Assures Gen. Schenck that Gen. Isaac R. Trimble (CSA) has not been imprisoned in Baltimore for fear traitorous associates will contact him. Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 12 July 1863, CW, 6:325.

Monday, July 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives call for help to subdue mob resisting draft in New York. John Jay and others to Lincoln, 13 July 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sec. Welles calls on President and suggests that Acting Rear Adm. Porter be made rear admiral. Welles, Diary.

Lincoln writes Gen. Grant: "I do not remember that you and I ever met personally. I write this now as a grateful acknowledgment for the almost inestimable service you have done the country. . . . When you got below, and took Port-Gibson, Grand Gulf, and vicinity, I thought you should go down the river and join Gen. Banks; and when you turned Northward East of the Big Black, I feared it was a mistake. I now wish to make the personal acknowledgment that you were right, and I was wrong." Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 13 July 1863, CW, 6:326.

Writes Gen. Schofield in St. Louis: "I regret to learn of the arrest of the Democrat editor. . . . but I care very little for the publication of any letter I have written. Please spare me the trouble this is likely to bring." Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, [13 July] 1863, CW, 6:326-27.

Tuesday, July 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Shortly before cabinet meeting President learns that Gen. R. E. Lee has crossed into Virginia. Sec. Welles walks to War Dept. with Lincoln, who is depressed by Lee's escape. Two hours later Welles returns to War Dept. and finds Lincoln there lying on sofa, dejected and discouraged. Welles, Diary.

After noon Lincoln visits Navy Yard and witnesses firing of 20 Absterdam shells from army field gun. Bruce, Tools of War, 259.

President recognizes Carlos Enrique Leland as vice consul of Oriental Republic of Uruguay at New York. Washington Chronicle, 16 July 1863.

Telegraphs Robert Lincoln in New York: "Why do I hear no more of you?" Abraham Lincoln to Robert T. Lincoln, 14 July 1863, CW, 6:327.

Writes Gen. Meade: "I have just seen your despatch to Gen. Halleck, asking to be relieved of your command, because of a supposed censure of mine. . . . But I was in such deep distress myself that I could not restrain some expression of it. . . . I do not believe you appreciate the magnitude of the misfortune involved in Lee's escape. He was within your easy grasp, and to have closed upon him would, in connection with our other late successes, have ended the war. . . . Your golden opportunity is gone, and I am distressed immeasurably because of it." [The letter was never signed or sent.] Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 14 July 1863, CW, 6:327-29.

Wednesday, July 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to Leonard Swett, whom he "authorized . . . to take possession of" the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine after the U.S. Supreme Court voided Andres Castillero's ownership claim. Lincoln rethinks the order concerning the Santa Clara County, California mine, and writes, "Many persons are telegraphing me from California, begging me, for the peace, of the State, to suspend the military enforcement of the writ of possession . . . while you are the single one who urges the contrary. You know I would like to oblige you, but it seems to me my duty . . . is the other way." Abraham Lincoln to Charles W. Rand, 8 May 1863, CW, 6:205-206; Abraham Lincoln to Leonard Swett, 15 July 1863, CW, 6:333-34; Milton H. Shutes, Abraham Lincoln and the New Almaden Mine (San Francisco, CA: Lawton R. Kennedy, 1936), 6-8.

Approves letter of J. R. Gilmore to Gov. Zebulon B. Vance (N.C.) regarding restoration of peace between states, reunion of states on basis of abolition of slavery, and reinstatement of Confederate citizens in all rights of citizenship. Endorsement on Letter of James R. Gilmore to Zebulon B. Vance, [15? July 1863], CW, 6:330-31.

Robert Lincoln quotes President as saying after Confederate army's escape following Battle of Gettysburg: "If I had gone up there I could have licked them myself." Nicolay, Lincoln's Secretary, 171; Hay, Letters and Diary.

President proclaims "Thursday the 6th. day of August next, to be observed as a day for National Thanksgiving, Praise and Prayer." Proclamation of Thanksgiving, 15 July 1863, CW, 6:332-33.

Thursday, July 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews Gov. Carney (Kans.) regarding right of governor to appoint military officers. Abraham Lincoln to Thomas Carney, 21 July 1863, CW, 6:339-40.

Friday, July 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President at cabinet meeting affirms his faith in Gen. Meade. Welles, Diary.

Directs Sec. Stanton to place governor of Kansas on same ground as other loyal governors in giving original commissions. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 17 July 1863, CW, 6:335.

Saturday, July 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President and Judge Adv. Gen. Holt spend six hours reviewing courtmartial sentences. Lincoln averse to death sentence for cowardice. Hay, Letters and Diary; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 July 1863, CW, 6:335; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 July 1863, CW, 6:335; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 July 1863, CW, 6:335-36; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 July 1863, CW, 6:336; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 July 1863, CW, 6:336; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 July 1863, CW, 6:336; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 July 1863, CW, 6:336; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 July 1863, CW, 6:336; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 July 1863, CW, 6:337.

To Hay, Lincoln remarks on case of Capt. James M. Cutts, Jr., (See October 26, 1863) charged with furtively watching woman undress, that Cutts should be elevated to "peerage" with title of "Count Peeper." Hay, Letters and Diary.

Lincoln's pronunciation resembles name of Count Piper, Swedish diplomat.

Sunday, July 19, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President in excellent humor; scribbles doggerel for John Hay. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Sec. Seward makes appointment for President with Lord Lyons at Soldiers' Home, 8:30 P.M. Seward to Lincoln, 17 July 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Monday, July 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to New Jersey Governor Joel Parker, who wrote to Lincoln with concerns about the new Enrollment Act. Parker wrote, "[N]o man can predict the results which might follow the enforcement of the draft in the present feverish state of the public mind. . . . I deem it my duty to state to you that there is a deep rooted hostility with many of the people of this state to the provisions of . . . the conscription act, which is liable to lead to popular outbreak if it be enforced." Lincoln answers, "It is a very delicate matter to postpone the draft in one State, because of the argument it furnishes others to have postponements also. . . . I wish to avoid the difficulties you dread, as much as yourself." Joel Parker to Abraham Lincoln, 15 July 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Joel Parker, 20 July 1863, CW, 6:337-38.

Congs. Lovejoy (Ill.) and Arnold (Ill.) discuss with Lincoln problems of slavery and Border States. Francis F. Browne, The Everyday Life of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Thompson, 1886), 533.

President recognizes Guillermo B. Newberry as consul of Peru at Boston. Washington Chronicle, 21 July 1863.

Tuesday, July 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

W. Butler and group of businessmen interview President to obtain privileges of trade. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 21 July 1863, CW, 6:340.

Lincoln expresses confidence in Gen. Meade "as a brave and skillful officer." Abraham Lincoln to Oliver O. Howard, 21 July 1863, CW, 6:341-42; Hay, Letters and Diary.

Directs Sec. Stanton to renew effort "to raise colored forces along the shores of the Mississippi," and suggests Adjt. Gen. Thomas as one of best "instruments for this service." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 21 July 1863, CW, 6:342.

Wednesday, July 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President unwell in morning. Scarcely takes food all day. Misses appointment with Gen. Schenck. Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 23 July 1863, CW, 6:345-46.

Suggests $2,500 as annual compensation for chief chemist of Agriculture Dept. Abraham Lincoln to Isaac Newton, 22 July 1863, CW, 6:343.

President Lincoln writes a letter of introduction for a Mr. Houston to present to the Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. Lincoln writes, "[the] bearer of this, now has three sons in the war. He wishes the youngest, Albert P. Houston, now in the 108th Ills regiment, at Vicksburg [Mississippi], transferred to the 1st West Tennessee regiment of Cavalry, at Bolivar [Tennessee] when last heard from, and in which is one of his elder brothers. I would like for him to be obliged." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 22 July 1863, Henry Horner Lincoln Collection, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, Springfield, IL.

Thursday, July 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln interviews Nehemiah G. Ordway, chairman of Republican Central Committee of New Hampshire, regarding Col. Walter Harriman and equalization of draft. Ordway to Lincoln, 24 July 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 27 July 1863, CW, 6:352.

President Lincoln replies to a "very 'cross'" letter from Missouri Governor Hamilton R. Gamble. Lincoln admits that he did not read Gamble's letter because "I am trying to preserve my own temper, by avoiding irritants, so far as practicable." Gamble took offense at comments Lincoln made in a letter to General John M. Schofield concerning the contentious relationship between Gamble and Schofield's predecessor, General Samuel R. Curtis. Lincoln writes, "I was totally unconscious of any malice, or disrespect towards you, or of using any expression which should offend you, if seen by you." Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 27 May 1863, CW, 6:234; Daily Missouri Democrat (St. Louis), 27 June 1863, 1:1; Hamilton R. Gamble to Abraham Lincoln, 13 July 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Hamilton R. Gamble, 23 July 1863, CW, 6:344-45; Michael Burlingame and John R. Turner Ettlinger, Inside Lincoln's White House: The Complete Civil War Diary of John Hay (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1997), 66-67.

Writes Gen. Schenck to clear up any misunderstanding about their meeting. "I beg you will not believe I have treated you with intentional discourtesy." Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 23 July 1863, CW, 6:345-46.

Friday, July 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At cabinet meeting inquiries are made about army, but no information is communicated. Sec. Seward confers with President for an hour before meeting. Welles, Diary.

President suspends action in six courtmartial cases of men sentenced to be shot for desertion. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 24 July 1863, CW, 6:347.

President Lincoln writes to Postmaster General Montgomery Blair regarding job openings. Lincoln writes, "Yesterday little indorsements of mine went to you in two cases of Post-Masterships sought for widows whose husbands have fallen in . . . battles . . . These cases occurring on the same day, brought me to reflect more attentively than I had before done, as to what is fairly due from us here, in the dispensing of patronage . . . My conclusion is that, other claims and qualifications being equal, they have the better right; and this is especially applicable to the disabled soldier, and the deceased soldier's family." Abraham Lincoln to Montgomery Blair, 24 July 1863, CW, 6:346; New York Daily Tribune, 29 July 1863, 1;2.

Saturday, July 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At night John Hay accompanies President to Soldiers' Home. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Lincoln explains to Gov. Parker (N.J.) that it would breed trouble to "have a special stipulation with the Governor of any one State" regarding draft quotas. "As it stands, the best I can say is, that every volunteer you will present us within thirty days from this date . . . shall be, pro-tanto—an abatement of your quota of the draft." Abraham Lincoln to Joel Parker, 25 July 1863, CW, 6:347-48.

Orders Sec. Welles to: 1. cease "using any neutral port, to watch neutral vessels, and then to dart out and seize them on their departure"; 2. cease detaining "the crew of a captured neutral vessel . . . on board such vessel, as prisoners of war." Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 25 July 1863, CW, 6:348-50.

Sunday, July 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sec. Welles confers with President about reinforcements for Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore who is cooperating with Rear Adm. Dahlgren in siege of Charleston. Welles, Diary.

Monday, July 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Joseph J. Grimshaw calls and asks President to make Col. Arthur H. Grimshaw a brigadier general. Memorandum: Appointment of Arthur H. Grimshaw, 27 July 1863, CW, 6:351.

Lincoln inquires of Gen. Meade: "I have not thrown Gen. Hooker away; and therefore I would like to know whether, it would be agreeable to you, all things considered, for him to take a corps under you, if he himself is willing to do so." Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 27 July 1863, CW, 6:350.

Explains to Gen. Burnside that Gen. Grant said he would return IX Corps. "Grant is a copious worker, and fighter, but a very meagre writer, or telegrapher. No doubt he changed his purpose in regard to the Ninth Corps, for some sufficient reason, but has forgotten to notify us of it." Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 27 July 1863, CW, 6:350.

Tuesday, July 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in New York: "Bob went to Fort-Monroe & only got back to-day. Will start to you at 11. AM tomorrow. All well." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 28 July 1863, CW, 6:353.

Recommends to Sec. Stanton that wounded Confederate, Capt. Robert Brown, prisoner in Gettysburg, be transferred to care of relatives in Washington. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 23 July 1863, CW, 6:353.

Wednesday, July 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln authorizes Gen. Halleck to inform Gen. Meade that government is not "demanding of him to bring on a general engagement with Lee as soon as possible." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 29 July 1863, CW, 6:354.

Requests sec. of war to consult with general in chief on subject of organizing force to go to western Texas. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 29 July 1863, CW, 6:354-55.

Deposits July 1862 salary warrant for $2,083.33 in Riggs Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.

Thursday, July 30, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln signs an Oder of Retaliation in which he outlines measures "to give protection to . . . citizens, of whatever class, color, or condition, and especially to those who are duly organized as soldiers in the public service." Lincoln pledges, "The government of the United States will give the same protection to all its soldiers, and if the enemy shall sell or enslave anyone because of his color, the offense shall be punished by retaliation upon the enemy's prisoners in our possession." Order of Retaliation, 30 July 1863, CW, 6:357.

Writes F. P. Blair, Sr.: "Yesterday I commenced trying to get up an expedition for Texas. I shall do the best I can." Abraham Lincoln to Francis P. Blair, Sr., 30 July 1863, CW, 6:356.

Friday, July 31, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President sends condolences to Frederick VII, King of Denmark, on death of Prince Frederick Ferdinand. Abraham Lincoln to Frederick VII, 31 July 1863, CW, 6:357-58.

Interviews L. H. Chandler acting as counsel for Dr. David M. Wright of Norfolk in murder case before military commission. Chandler to Lincoln, 1 August 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Cabinet listens for two hours to report presented by Col. John A. Rawlins on capture of Vicksburg, Miss. Welles, Diary.

Lincoln asks Gen. Hurlbut to reconsider question of resigning. Hay, Letters and Diary; Abraham Lincoln to Stephen A. Hurlbut, 31 July 1863, CW, 6:358-59.

Writes Samuel W. Moulton, enrollment commissioner for 10th District of Illinois: "Your removal has been strongly urged on the ground of 'presistent disobedience of orders and neglect of duty.' . . . I consider your services in your district valuable, and should be sorry to lose them. . . . I hope you will conclude to go on in your present position under the regulations of the Department." Abraham Lincoln to Samuel W. Moulton, 31 July 1863, CW, 6:359-60.

Saturday, August 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews Patrick Murphy of New York, father of Col. Murphy, regarding employment. Abraham Lincoln to Hiram Barney, 1 August 1863, CW, 6:361.

J. G. Hamilton of Illinois sees President in interest of William T. Smithson, held in Old Capitol Prison, 1st St., on charge of treason. Endorsement Concerning William T. Smithson, 1 August 1863, CW, 6:361.

President transmits to adjutant general petition of citizens of Shenandoah Valley requesting that Gen. Milroy be restored to command. DNA—WR RG 107, Off. Sec. War, Register of Letters Received, EB 3, Entry 117.

President and John Hay attend dedication of new printing office, home of Washington "Chronicle," on 9th St. Hay, Letters and Diary.

President converts eleven salary drafts, August 1862 to June 1863, amounting to $22,306.67 into U.S. treasury loan certificate bearing 5 per cent interest. Washington Chronicle, 17 October 1864; Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.

Monday, August 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln orders stay of execution in case of Dr. David M. Wright for the murder of Second Lieutenant Alanson L. Sanborn in Norfolk, Virginia. Abraham Lincoln to John G. Foster, 3 August 1863, CW, 6:362.

Regrets Gen. James H. Van Alen, 3d New York Cavalry, forced to resign because of poor health. Abraham Lincoln to James H. Van Alen, 3 August 1863, CW, 6:363.

Writes second memorandum on appointment of G. T. Harris to West Point. "As soon as I consistently can, I wish to oblige Bishop McIlvaine." Memorandum: Appointment of George T. Harris, 3 August 1863, CW, 6:362.

Tuesday, August 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets. Seward talks on subject of prizes and prize courts. Welles, Diary.

Wednesday, August 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cong. Boutwell (Mass.) interviews President on Louisiana affairs. Abraham Lincoln to Nathaniel P. Banks, 5 August 1863, CW, 6:364-66.

Lincoln receives July salary warrant for $2,022.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.

President Lincoln writes to General Nathaniel P. Banks regarding Louisiana's possible readmission into the Union. Lincoln writes, "I would be glad for her to make a new Constitution recognizing the emancipation proclamation . . . And . . . to adopt some practical system by which the two races could gradually live themselves out of their old relation to each other, and both come out better prepared for the new. Education for young blacks should be included in the plan." Lincoln adds, "If these views can . . . giv[e] . . . impetus, to action there, I shall be glad for you to use them prudently for that object." Abraham Lincoln to Nathaniel P. Banks, 5 August 1863, CW, 6:364-66.

Telegraphs Cincinnati "Gazette": "Please send me your present posting as to Kentucky election." Abraham Lincoln to the Cincinnati Gazette, 5 August 1863, CW, 6:366.

Reviews production of gunpowder by Capt. Diller and Dr. Charles M. Wetherill in letter to I. Newton and discusses Wetherill's salary. Abraham Lincoln to Isaac Newton, 5 August 1863, CW, 6:367-68.

Thursday, August 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President attends church services, having proclaimed August 6, 1863 day of thanksgiving. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Speaks at Union meeting in city. John W. Forney, Anecdotes of Public Men, 2 vols. (New York: Harper, 1873-81), 1:168.

Informs John Hay that danger of war with England is past, temporarily at least. Monaghan, Diplomat, 321.

Friday, August 7, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln declines invitation of Gov. Joseph A. Gilmore (N.H.) to visit Concord, N.H. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Gilmore, 7 August 1863, CW, 6:368.

Directs that $20,000 be placed under control of Sec. Seward and $80,000 under control of Sec. Stanton for expenses of carrying into effect habeas corpus act. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 7 August 1863, CW, 6:368-69; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 7 August 1863, CW, 6:370-71.

President Lincoln responds to New York Governor Horatio Seymour, who seeks to halt "the draft in this State." Seymour cited the recent New York City draft riots and he suggeted that the draft law was unconstitutional. Lincoln disagrees and writes, "time is too important. . . . We are contending with an enemy who . . . drives every able bodied man he can reach, into his ranks, very much as a butcher drives bullocks into a slaughter-pen. . . . It produces an army with a rapidity not to be matched on our side . . . My purpose is to be just and constitutional; and yet practical." Horatio Seymour to Abraham Lincoln, 3 August 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Horatio Seymour, 7 August 1863, CW, 6:369-70.

[Mrs. Lincoln and Robert are in White Mountains. Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 75.]

Saturday, August 8, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President sends Gov. Peirpoint (Va.) to Portsmouth, Va., to aid destitute families. Abraham Lincoln to John G. Foster, 8 August 1863, CW, 6:371.

President Lincoln writes to his wife Mary and relays news to her and their son Tad. He writes, "Tell dear Tad, poor 'Nanny Goat,' is lost; and [the housekeeper] Mrs. Cuthbert & I are in distress...The day you left Nanny was found resting...and chewing her little cud, on the middle of Tad's bed. But now she's gone! The gardener kept complaining that she destroyed the flowers...it was concluded to bring her down to the White House. This was done, and the second day she had disappeared, and has not been heard of since." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 8 August 1863, CW, 6:371-72; Justin G. Turner and Linda Levitt Turner, Mary Todd Lincoln: Her Life and Letters (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1972), 99.

Sunday, August 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln acknowledges receipt of petition from people of East Tennessee presented by John M. Fleming and Robert Morrow: "The Secretary of War , Gen. Halleck, Gen. Burnside, and Gen. Rosecrans are all engaged now in an effort to relieve your section." Abraham Lincoln to John M. Fleming and Robert Morrow, 9 August 1863, CW, 6:373-74.

President Lincoln writes to General Ulysses S. Grant and lobbies for the recruitment of black soldiers. Lincoln writes, "Gen. [Lorenzo] Thomas has gone again to the Mississippi Valley, with the view of raising colored troops. I have no reason to doubt that you are doing what you reasonably can upon the same subject. I believe it is a resource which, if vigorously applied now, will soon close the contest. It works doubly, weakening the enemy and strengthening us." Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 9 August 1863, CW, 6:374-75.

In company of John Hay visits new studio of Alexander and James Gardner, corner of 7th and D Sts., over Shephard and Riley's Bookstore, and poses for several photographs. Frederick H. Meserve and Carl Sandburg, The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1944), 9 August 1863.

Monday, August 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln assures Gen. Rosecrans: "I am not casting blame upon you. I rather think, by great exertion, you can get to East Tennessee. . . . I think of you in all kindness and confidence: . . . I am not watching you with an evil-eye." Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 10 August 1863, CW, 6:377-78.

President Lincoln meets with Senator Samuel Pomeroy, of Kansas, and with abolitionist and former slave Frederick Douglass. Lincoln's personal secretary John Hay recorded, "[Douglass] intends to go south and help the recruiting among his people." Also on this day, Lincoln adds the endorsement, "I concur," to a letter that the Secretary of the Interior John Usher and Senator Pomeroy signed. The letter acknowledges, "Douglass, is . . . a loyal, free, man, and is, hence, entitled to travel, unmolested. We trust he will be recognized everywhere, as a free man, and a gentleman." Michael Burlingame and John R. Turner Ettlinger, eds., Inside Lincoln's White House: The Complete Civil War Diary of John Hay (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1997), 72; Pass for Frederick Douglass, 10 August 1863, CW, 10:198; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 11 August 1863, 2:4.

Gen. Hooker visits Lincoln and accepts offer of command under Gen. Meade. Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 11 August 1863, CW, 6:381.

At cabinet meeting President reads letter from Gov. Seymour (N.Y.) asking that draft be postponed and his own reply refusing to postpone it. Welles, Diary.

Writes Mrs. Elizabeth E. Hutter, Miss Claghorn, and Misses Lager of Philadelphia: "If anything could enhance to me the value of this representation of our national ensign, so elegantly executed and so gracefully bestowed, it would be the consideration that its price has been devoted to the comfort and restoration of those heroic men, who have suffered and bled in our flag's defense." Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Hutter, Misses Lager, and Miss Claghorn, 10 August 1863, CW, 6:375-76.

Sends his ideas regarding treatment of captured neutrals in prize courts to Sec. Seward, and concludes: "My judgment [is] that the within, substantially, should be the answer to Lord Lyons." Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 10 August 1863, CW, 6:378-80.

Inquires of Sec. Stanton : "I have not heard of any charges being filed against Gen. J. A. McClernand. Are there any?" Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 10 August 1863, CW, 6:380.

Tuesday, August 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At cabinet meeting President reads another letter from Gov. Seymour (N.Y.) on draft. Problem of drafting skilled workers arises in cabinet discussions. Welles, Diary.

Atty. Gen. Bates presents to cabinet material reflecting on Gen. Halleck. Bates, Diary.

Lincoln again makes it clear to Seymour that draft cannot be suspended. Abraham Lincoln to Horatio Seymour, 11 August 1863, CW, 6:381-82.

President writes check: "No. 52 Washington, D.C. Aug. 11 1863 RIGGS & CO. Pay to Colored man, with one leg. or bearer Five . . . . . . Dollars $5/00. A. Lincoln." Check, 11 August 1863, CW, 6:380.

Informs Gen. Meade that Gen. Hooker would accept command under him, "if it was still open." Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 11 August 1863, CW, 6:381.

Wednesday, August 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

William G. Greene of Illinois calls and presents letter on behalf of Gen. McClernand signed by Gov. Yates (Ill.), O. M. Hatch, and J. K. Dubois. Lincoln writes McClernand: "For me to force you back upon Gen. Grant, would be forcing him to resign. I can not give you a new command, because we have no forces except such as already have commanders. . . . This is now your case, which, as I have before said, pains me, not less than it does you." Abraham Lincoln to John A. McClernand, 12 August 1863, CW, 6:383-84.

Interviews Gen. Blair, former Cong. Edward Haight (N.Y.), and former Cong. R. Holland Duell (N.Y.). N.Y. Herald, 14 August 1863.

Thursday, August 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt regarding Major Alexander Montgomery's dismissal from the Army. Montgomery allegedly remarked that "President Lincoln ought to have his dam'd black heart cut out for issuing his proclamation of Emancipation." Lincoln writes, "As the principal charge, can be given the appearance at least of being merely personally offensive to me, and as [Montgomery] denies it, I think he should have a Court-Martial, rather than to abide my arbitrary dismissal. Please give him the Court-Martial if he desires it." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 13 August 1863, CW, 6:385; John S. Cosgrove to Alexander Montgomery, 17 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Group of Republican leaders including Sen. Harris (N.Y.) and Gov. David Tod (Ohio) confers at White House with President. N.Y. Herald, 14 August 1863.

Lincoln and John Hay visit Capitol to see progress of rebuilding program. Hay, Letters and Diary.

President interviews Silas M. Hamilton of Baltimore, who has a plan for bringing North Carolina "once more into terms of harmony with the mother government of these States." Hamilton to Lincoln, 15 August 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Friday, August 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln and cabinet hear Gen. Meade describe parts of Battle of Gettysburg. Welles, Diary; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 14 August 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Lincoln writes: "My dear Cousin Lizzie [Elizabeth Todd Grimsley] I have, by the law, two classes of appointments to make to the Naval-School. . . . if I have a vacancy in the first class, I can not appoint Johnny [John Todd Grimsley], to it; and I have intended for months, and still intend, to appoint him to the very first vacancy I can get in the other class." Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Elizabeth J. Grimsley, 14 August 1863, CW, 6:385-86.

[See October 1, 1863.]

Saturday, August 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President at War Dept. in morning regarding status of Gen. Anderson, who receives assignment to Fort Adams, R.I. Abraham Lincoln to Robert Anderson, 15 August 1863, CW, 6:386-87.

Extends leave of absence of Gen. Blair and Col. Martin D. Hardin for 20 and 10 days respectively. Extension of Leave for Francis P. Blair, Jr., 15 August 1863, CW, 6:388; Extension of Leave for Martin D. Hardin, 15 August 1863, CW, 6:388.

Prepares proclamation authorizing use of military force, if necessary to overcome opposition to draft law. Abraham Lincoln to Horatio Seymour, [15 August] 1863, CW, 6:389-91.

Committee of the Union League, Washington Council No. 4 meets in the evening with the President at the Soldier's Home. The committee reads a statement pleading for justice in the case of Dr. David M. Wright, who killed Second Lieutenant Alanson L. Sanborn in Norfolk, Virginia. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 17 August 1863, 2:5.

Sunday, August 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President asks W. O. Stoddard to serve as audience while he composes letter in which he uses expression "web-feet" in referring to navy [letter to J. C. Conkling, August 26, 1863]. William O. Stoddard, Inside the White House in War Times (New York: C. L. Webster, 1890), 227.

Monday, August 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

In morning Frederick P. Stanton, Washington attorney and former Congressman (Tenn.), consults with President regarding changing an order in court of inquiry. Abraham Lincoln to Frederick P. Stanton, 17 August 1863, CW, 6:395.

Christopher M. Spencer, inventor of Spencer rifle, presents rifle to President and demonstrates how to assemble it. W. A. Bartlett, "Lincoln's Seven Hits with a Rifle," Magazine of History 19 (1921):73, 71.

President Lincoln writes to Shakespearean actor James H. Hackett and shares his thoughts on the playwright's works. Lincoln writes, "For one of my age, I have seen very little of the drama. The first presentation of Falstaff I ever saw was yours here, last winter or spring...Some of Shakspeare's plays I have never read; while others I have gone over perhaps as frequently as any unprofessional reader. Among the latter are Lear, Richard Third, Henry Eighth, Hamlet, and especially Macbeth. I think nothing equals Macbeth. It is wonderful." Lincoln adds, "I should like to hear you pronounce the opening speech of Richard the Third. Will you not soon visit Washington again?" Abraham Lincoln to James H. Hackett, 17 August 1863, CW, 6:392-93. [See March 13, 1863.]

President Lincoln's coachman, Francis Burke, is exempted from the draft. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 17 August 1863, 2:6.

Tuesday, August 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to Major General James Blunt, who is feuding with Kansas Governor Thomas Carney. Carney, whom Blunt called "a theif and a liar," informed Lincoln that Blunt allowed "Citizens" to "execut[e]" two men who had been accused of "robbery." Lincoln notes that he has been satisfied with Blunt's past performance, "[but] to take men charged with no offence against the military, out of the hands of the courts, to be turned over to a mob to be hanged, can find no precedent or principle to justify it." James G. Blunt to Abraham Lincoln, 31 July 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Abraham Lincoln to James G. Blunt, 18 August 1863, CW, 6:395-97; Thomas Carney to Abraham Lincoln, 25 June 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

In afternoon Lincoln and C. M. Spencer, accompanied by Robert and John Hay, leave White House and walk to Treasury Park, where they test Spencer rifle. Bruce, Tools of War, 262-63.

Lincoln buys loan certificate for $3,874.73 with July salary warrant for $2,022.33 and $1,852.40 in greenbacks. Pratt, Personal Finances, 127-28, 183.

Wednesday, August 19, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President confers with Sec. Stanton , who promises to return to trustees schoolhouse of First District of Washington. Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin B. French, 19 August 1863, CW, 6:397-98.

Interviews Judge James B. Colt of Missouri, stepfather of Singleton Wilson in Camp Morton prison, Ind. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 19 August 1863, CW, 6:398; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 20 August 1863, CW, 6:398-99.

Enjoys target practice with Spencer repeating rifle. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Meets with Schuyler Colfax of Indiana. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 20 August 1863, 2d ed., 2:2.

Count Nicholas Giorgi, minister of Austria, presents credentials to President without usual exchange of formal addresses. William H. Seward to Abraham Lincoln, 19 August 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 20 August 1863, 2d ed., 2:2.

Thursday, August 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives from Gen. Heintzelman notice of death of Gov. Gurley (Arizona Terr.). Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Visits telegraph office in afternoon. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 20 August 1863, CW, 6:399-400.

Goes down river on invitation of Gen. Barnard to see new fort on Rosier's Bluff about three and one-half miles above Fort Washington, Va. Sec. Stanton , Gens. Wadsworth, John H. Martindale, Meigs, and Barnard in party. Lincoln arrives home after dark. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Friday, August 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles in conference with President on proposed instructions for U.S. naval officers and appointment of governor for territory of Arizona. Welles, Diary.

Young Pittsburgh boy has interview with Lincoln, who writes note for him to see Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 21 August 1863, CW, 6:400.

President Lincoln meets with a twelve-member committee representing the American Baptist Missionary Convention. Leonard A. Grimes, of Boston, Massachusetts, chairs the black delegation that seeks Lincoln's assurances for their safety as they venture "within . . . military lines [to] minister to their brethren there." Lincoln addresses a letter "To whom it may concern" and presents it to Grimes. Lincoln writes, "[The Convention's] object is a worthy one, and I shall be glad for all facilities to be afforded them which may not be inconsistent with or a hindrance to our military operations." Abraham Lincoln to Whom It May Concern, 21 August 1863, CW, 6:401; Washington Daily Morning Chronicle (DC), 26 August 1863, 3:1; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 26 August 1863, 3:2.

Secretary Welles accompanies Richard C. McCormick, secretary, Arizona Territory, and Joseph P. Allyn, associate justice, Arizona Territory, to White House conference with President. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President, accompanied by Secretary of War Stanton and some military officers, goes down the Potomac River aboard a steamer in the afternoon to visit the defenses of Washington, opposite Alexandria, Virginia, and return. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 22 August 1863, 2:4.

Saturday, August 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

In Panoche Grande, Calif., land grant case of Gen. Sickles, Lincoln decides: "I do not think I should meddle as a volunteer." Abraham Lincoln to Daniel E. Sickles, 22 August 1863, CW, 6:402; Milton H. Shutes, Abraham Lincoln and the New Almaden Mine (San Francisco, CA: L. R. Kennedy, 1936), 17.

In evening President, John Hay, and Mrs. Long visit observatory, 23d and E Sts. NW. Hay goes to Soldiers' Home with President and falls asleep listening to him read Shakespeare. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Sunday, August 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Soon after breakfast Lincoln and John Hay return to White House, and Lincoln drafts letter to J. C. Conkling. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Monday, August 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President requests Sec. Welles to identify naval officer killed at Fort Wagner, Charleston Harbor. [He was Comdr. George W. Rodgers (USN).] Welles, Diary.

John Hay leaves in afternoon for New York and Long Branch, N.J. Washington Chronicle, 25 August 1863.

President hears from Gen. McClernand, who writes: "Feeling that I have done my duty I shrink from no charges that Genl. Grant may prefer. . . . I only ask . . . for an impartial court. Such investigation would bring to light . . . many things, both military and personal, which are unwritten or unheeded." Abraham Lincoln to John A. McClernand, 12 August 1863, CW, 6:383-84.

Tuesday, August 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President requests Sec. Usher to determine procedure in claim of Illinois for 2 per cent on sales of public lands and pursue it. Abraham Lincoln to Isaac N. Morris, 26 August 1863, CW, 6:411-12.

Wednesday, August 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to James C. Conkling, of Springfield, Illinois, and declines an invitation to speak on September 3 at a "mass-meeting of unconditional Union-men." Lincoln acknowledges that he has detractors who "blame" him for prolonging the war. Lincoln responds, "To such I would say: you desire peace . . . But how can we attain it? . . . If you are not for force, nor yet for dissolution, there only remains some imaginable compromise. I do not believe any compromise, embracing the maintenance of the Union, is now possible. All I learn, leads to a directly opposite belief. The strength of the rebellion, is its military—its army." Abraham Lincoln to James C. Conkling, 26 August 1863, CW, 6:406-10.

Thursday, August 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"My dear Conkling I can not leave here now. Herewith is a letter [Aug. 26] instead. You are one of the best public readers. I have but one suggestion. Read it very slowly." Abraham Lincoln to James C. Conkling, 27 August 1863, CW, 6:414.

President denies stay of execution of five bounty jumpers. Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 27 August 1863, CW, 6:414-15.

Receives protest from mayor and comptroller of Chicago claiming unfairness of draft. Abraham Lincoln to Francis C. Sherman and Samuel S. Hayes, 27 August 1863, CW, 6:417-18.

Friday, August 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews Gov. Curtin (Pa.) regarding draft quotas. Washington Chronicle, 29 August 1863.

Declines invitation to attend presentation of sword honoring Gen. Meade. Abraham Lincoln to Samuel W. Crawford, 28 August 1863, CW, 6:418.

Saturday, August 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President at Treasury Dept. in afternoon consults with Sec. Chase on results of arming Negro troops. Official Records—Armies 532.

Sends copy of his August 26, 1863 Conkling letter to Union State Committee of New York. Abraham Lincoln to Ben Field, 29 August 1863, CW, 6:420; Abraham Lincoln to Ben Field, 29 August 1863, CW, 6:420.

President Lincoln writes to his wife, Mary, who is in Manchester, New Hampshire. He relays war news, particularly regarding the Charleston, South Carolina area. Lincoln writes, "All quite well. Fort-Sumpter is certainly battered down, and utterly useless to the enemy, and it is believed here, but not entirely certain, that both Sumpter and Fort-Wagner, are occupied by our forces. It is also certain that Gen. [Quincy Adams] Gilmore [Gillmore] has thrown some shot into the City of Charleston." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 29 August 1863, CW, 6:421.

Monday, August 31, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sen. Bowden (Va.), L. H. Chandler, and former Cong. Segar (Va.) confer with President about tax imposed on people of Northampton County to rebuild lighthouse destroyed by Confederates. Official Records—Armies 534-35.

President recognizes Paul Guye as vice consul of Swiss Confederation at St. Louis for states of Missouri, Illinois, and Kansas, and Territory of Nebraska. Washington Chronicle, 2 September 1863.

Compliments Gen. Rosecrans: "I can never forget, whilst I remember anything, that about the end of last year, and beginning of this, you gave us a hard earned victory which, had there been a defeat instead, the nation could scarcely have lived over." Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 31 August 1863, CW, 6:424-25.

Tuesday, September 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President requests suspension of order compelling 400 persons on Eastern Shore of Virginia to take oath of allegiance and to pay assessment for damage to lighthouse. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 1 September 1863, CW, 6:427.

Wednesday, September 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln explains to Sec. Chase difficulty in applying Emancipation Proclamation to certain parts of Virginia and Louisiana. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 2 September 1863, CW, 6:428-29.

President Lincoln meets with Dorcas Klaprath, and then writes to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton about her request. Lincoln explains, "This woman says her husband and two sons are in the war; that the youngest son W. J. Klaproth, is a private in Co. D, of 143rd Pennsylvania, volunteers, was wounded, made a prisoner & paroled at Gettysburg, and is now at Center-Street hospital, New-Jersey; and that he was under eighteen when he entered the service without the consent of his father or herself. She says she is destitute, and she asks that he may be discharged[.] If she makes satisfactory proof of the above let it be done." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 2 September 1863, CW, 6:429.

J. W. Forney interviews Lincoln on integrity of press. Abraham Lincoln to James C. Conkling, 3 September 1863, CW, 6:430.

[Irwin deposits $120, interest on I. Lindsay note, in Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165.]

Thursday, September 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President irritated by publication of letter to J. C. Conkling prior to meeting for which it was written. Abraham Lincoln to James C. Conkling, 3 September 1863, CW, 6:430; Harper, Press, 134.

Mrs. Lincoln at Manchester, Vt., receives message from President: "The Secretary of War tells me he has telegraphed Gen. [Abner] Doubleday to await further orders. We are all well, and have nothing new." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 3 September 1863, CW, 6:431.

Friday, September 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet discusses trade regulations covering exportation of livestock. Official Records—Armies 539-40.

President modifies order concerning export of war material. Order Concerning Export of War Material, 4 September 1863, CW, 6:432.

Interviews Francis S. Corkran, naval officer, Baltimore customhouse, who brings charges against James L. Ridgely, collector of internal revenue at Baltimore. Francis S. Corkran to Abraham Lincoln, 19 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Saturday, September 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jr., and directs him to quartermaster general. Abraham Lincoln to Montgomery C. Meigs, 5 September 1863, CW, 6:432-33.

Receives August salary warrant for $2,022.34. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.

Writes former Cong. Segar (Va.) of dispatch from Maj. Henry Z. Hayner reporting that people are jubilant over presidential order ending collection of lighthouse assessment as victory over government extorted by fear. "No dollar shall be refunded by my order, until it shall appear that my act in the case has been accepted in the right spirit." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Segar, 5 September 1863, CW, 6:434.

Sunday, September 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln at Manchester, Vt.: "All well, and no news, except that Gen. Burnside has Knoxville, Tennessee." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 6 September 1863, CW, 6:434.

Requests Gen. Schenck to "direct or order that the collection of the Light-House be suspended, and that the money already collected be held, both till further order." Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 6 September 1863, CW, 6:434-35.

Monday, September 7, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Mrs. Theophilus Brown tells Lincoln that her husband, now confined in Old Capitol Prison, was conscripted into Confederate army and will do anything reasonable to be at liberty. President directs Sec. Stanton : "Please take hold of the case, and do what may seem proper in it." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 7 September 1863, CW, 6:436-37.

Tuesday, September 8, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln interviews Mrs. Cordelia A. P. Harvey, widow of Gov. Lewis Harvey (Wis.), regarding hospital to be named for her late husband. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 9 September 1863, CW, 6:437.

Wednesday, September 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President smiles at Gen. Rosecrans' discouraged attitude revealed in communication. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Orders Gen. Meade to give Gen. Frank Wheaton "a leave of absence for ten or fifteen days," if it can be done without injury to service. Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 9 September 1863, CW, 6:437.

Thursday, September 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President sends Dr. John P. Gray of Utica, New York, to Norfolk, Virginia, to conduct examination and collect evidence of sanity or insanity of Dr. David M. Wright. Abraham Lincoln to John P. Gray, 10 September 1863, CW, 6:437-38.

Interviews I. Wayne McVeagh, chairman, Pennsylvania Union State Central Committee, relative to Gen. Butler assisting in campaign. McVeagh to Butler, 10 September 1863, Benjamin F. Butler Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Receives request from Gen. Burnside that he be allowed to resign. Burnside to Lincoln, 10 September 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Writes memorandum concerning Frederick Moelich, who protested his innocence of selling liquor to soldiers: "I can not listen to a man's own story, unsupported by any evidence, who has been convicted of violating the law; because that would put an end to all law." Memorandum Concerning Frederick Moelich, 10 September 1863, CW, 6:438.

Writes Gen. Wheaton: "Yesterday, at the instance of Mr. Blair, senr. I telegraphed Gen. Meade asking him to grant you a leave of absence, to which he replied that you had not applied for such leave, and that you can have it when you do apply. I suppose it is proper for you to know this." Abraham Lincoln to Frank Wheaton, 10 September 1863, CW, 6:439.

Friday, September 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Immediately after breakfast Sec. Chase at White House for President's approval of revised trade regulations. President reads draft of letter subsequently sent to Gov. Johnson (Tenn.), directing him to organize loyal state government at once. Official Records—Armies 541; Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 11 September 1863, CW, 6:440-41.

Sec. Stanton , Asst. Sec. Fox, and Gen. Halleck arrive to discuss situation at Charleston. President mentions Gen. Burnside's request for permission to resign and says it will not be granted at present. Official Records—Armies 541.

At cabinet meeting President "cordially and earnestly greeted" Sec. Welles, recently returned from 10-day inspection tour of navy yards. Welles, Diary.

Father of Lt. Adelbert S. Eddy calls on Lincoln, "saying his son has been in arrest for several months." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 11 September 1863, CW, 6:441.

President acknowledges letter of Vice President Hamlin: "Your letter of Aug. 22nd., to be presented by your son Cyrus is on my table; but I have not seen him, or know of his being here recently." Abraham Lincoln to Hannibal Hamlin, 11 September 1863, CW, 6:439-40.

Saturday, September 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln expresses his "personal gratification" upon receipt of letter from former Cong. Josiah Quincy (Mass.), president of Harvard University. Abraham Lincoln to Josiah Quincy, 12 September 1863, CW, 6:443.

Sec. Seward arranges for F. L. Barreda to present letter of ceremony to President at 12 M. Seward to Lincoln, 10 September 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sunday, September 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln sends to Dr. Gray in Norfolk "names [12] of those whose affidavits are left with me on the question of Dr. Wrights sanity." Abraham Lincoln to John P. Gray, 13 September 1863, CW, 6:443.

Monday, September 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

After breakfast Sec. Chase escorts Gov. Andrew (Mass.) to White House for conference with President. Official Records—Armies 543-44.

Lincoln calls special cabinet meeting for 11 A.M. to discuss decisions of certain judges releasing drafted men by writ of habeas corpus. Agrees to prepare an opinion for cabinet meeting following morning. Welles, Diary; Bates, Diary.

Tuesday, September 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At 9 A.M. President reads to cabinet opinion on military draft. [There is question as to when Lincoln prepared this opinion. Nicolay & Hay dates it 15 August 1863; CW dates it 14 September 1863.] Sec. Chase thinks preferable way to prevent courts from interfering with draft is for President by proclamation to suspend privilege of writ of habeas corpus in military or naval cases. Proposal wins approval. Cabinet adjourns at 1 P.M. Sec. Seward prepares proclamation and presents it when cabinet reconvenes. All agree and order it carried into effect. Welles, Diary; Bates, Diary; Opinion on the Draft, [14? September] 1863, CW, 6:444-49.

President issues proclamation suspending writ of habeas corpus. Proclamation Suspending Writ of Habeas Corpus, 15 September 1863, CW, 6:451-52.

Interviews Mrs. Craddock relative to rebel prisoner and directs her to Sec. Stanton . Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 15 September 1863, CW, 6:452.

Replies to request of J. K. Dubois and O. M. Hatch: "What nation do you desire Gen. Allen to be made Quarter-Master-General of? This nation already has a Quarter-Master-General." Abraham Lincoln to Jesse K. Dubois and Ozias M. Hatch, 15 September 1863, CW, 6:450.

Writes Gen. Halleck that Gen. Meade desires guidance as to what he should do. "My opinion is that he should move upon Lee at once in manner of general attack. . . . I think this would develope Lee's real condition and purposes better than the cavalry alone can do. Of course my opinion is not to control you and Gen. Meade." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 15 September 1863, CW, 6:450-51.

Wednesday, September 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President issues instructions to tax commissioners in South Carolina. Instructions to Tax Commissioners in South Carolina, 16 September 1863, CW, 6:453-59.

Thursday, September 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sec. Chase in morning conference with President in White House. Former Gov. Newell (N.J.) interviews Lincoln on behalf of deserter. Official Records—Armies 548; Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 17 September 1863, CW, 6:460-61.

President requests Sec. Chase to see Mr. Church [probably Lawrence S. Church of Woodstock] and Mr. Farwell [probably Charles B. Farwell of Chicago], gentlemen from Illinois. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 17 September 1863, CW, 6:460.

Wife of Capt. John S. Struthers calls and asks President that her husband be allowed to resign. Lincoln writes Sec. Stanton : "I would be for accepting it, on the general principle, that we are rapidly getting an over proportion of officers." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 17 September 1863, CW, 6:462.

Drafts order concerning writ of habeas corpus, whereby military officers will not produce their prisoners in obedience to such writs. Draft of Order Concerning Writ of Habeas Corpus, [17 September 1863], CW, 6:460.

Orders Gen. Schenck to send Maj. Hayner to Washington with "facts in relation to the misconduct of the people on the Eastern Shore of Virginia." Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 17 September 1863, CW, 6:461-62.

Friday, September 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln orders discharge of William ("Duff") Armstrong, whom he successfully defended in murder trial in 1858. Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Hannah Armstrong, 18 September 1863, CW, 6:462.

Urges Gov. Johnson (Tenn.) to "do your utmost to get every man you can, black and white, under arms at the very earliest moment." Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 18 September 1863, CW, 6:462-63.

Father of Sgt. Lewis H. Cox calls on Lincoln regarding son who was absent without leave and accepted pay as substitute. Order Concerning Lewis H. Cox, Alias John M. Dillon, 18 September 1863, CW, 6:463-64.

Interviews Mrs. Mary Duncan relative to cotton claimed by her husband. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 25 September 1863, CW, 6:481.

Suggests to C. M. Smith that he name his son "for the General you fancy most." Abraham Lincoln to Clark M. Smith, 18 September 1863, CW, 6:464-65.

Meets with Senator Edgar Cowan of Pennsylvania. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 18 September 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

[On the morning of September 19, 1863 Battle of Chickamauga begins about ten miles from Chattanooga.]

Saturday, September 19, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President sends word to Gen. Banks that Gen. A. J. Hamilton will act as military governor in Texas. Abraham Lincoln to Nathaniel P. Banks, 19 September 1863, CW, 6:465-66.

Authorizes Gov. Johnson (Tenn.) to exercise such powers as may be necessary to enable people of Tennessee to have republican form of state government. Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 19 September 1863, CW, 6:469.

In view of Gen. Meade's dispatch to Gen. Halleck, Lincoln writes Halleck that he would not order, or even advise, Gen. Meade to advance. He points out, however, that Gen. R. E. Lee has only 60,000 men to keep Meade out of Richmond, while Meade has 90,000 to keep Lee out of Washington. Lincoln is opposed to any "attempt to fight the enemy slowly back into his intrenchments at Richmond, and there to capture him. . . . I have constantly desired the Army of the Potomac, to make Lee's army, and not Richmond, it's objective point." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 19 September 1863, CW, 6:466-68.

Sunday, September 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln shows John Hay dispatch from Gen. Rosecrans relative to first day's fighting near Chattanooga and expresses anxiety. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Sends message to Mrs. Lincoln in New York: "I neither see nor hear anything of sickness here now; though there may be much without my knowing it. I wish you to stay, or come just as is most agreeable to yourself." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 20 September 1863, CW, 6:469.

Leaves Soldiers' Home at 10 P.M. and spends night in White House. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC, 21 September 1863.

Monday, September 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At 2 A.M. Lincoln telegraphs Gen. Burnside at Knoxville: "Go to Rosecrans with your force, without a moments delay." Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 21 September 1863, CW, 6:469-70.

Telegraphs Burnside again at 11 A.M.: "If you are to do any good to Rosecrans, it will not do to waste time with Jonesboro." Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 17 September 1863, CW, 6:470.

Takes news of Battle of Chickamauga to Sec. Welles. Welles, Diary.

Writes Gen. Halleck: "I think it very important for Gen. Rosecrans to hold his position, at or about Chattanooga, because, if held from that place to Cleveland, both inclusive, it keeps all Tennessee clear of the enemy, and also breaks one of his most important Railroad lines. . . . If he can only maintain this position, without more, the rebellion can only eke out a short and feeble existence, as an animal sometimes may with a thorn in its vitals." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 21 September 1863, CW, 6:470-71.

Sends message to Rosecrans: "Be of good cheer. We have unabated confidence in you, and in your soldiers and officers. In the main you must be the judge as to what is to be done. If I were to suggest, I would say, save your army, by taking strong positions, until Burnside joins you, when I hope you can turn the tide." Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 21 September 1863, CW, 6:472-73.

Recognizes Gouldree Boilieau as consul general of France at New York and Charles Ferdinand de Cazotte as consul of France at San Francisco. Washington Chronicle, 24 September 1863.

Lincoln telegraphs his wife, Mary, who is visiting New York City. He reports, "The air is so clear and cool, and apparantly healthy, that I would be glad for you to come. Nothing very particular, but I would be glad see you and Tad." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 21 September 1863, CW, 6:471-72.

Tuesday, September 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln grieves over death of brother-in-law, Gen. Ben Hardin Helm (CSA) killed at Chickamauga, Ga. Helm, Mary, 216-17.

Reviews Battle of Chickamauga at cabinet meeting. Sec. Chase shows him printed scheme for testimonial to Gen. McClellan being circulated in army for subscriptions. Official Records—Armies 549-50.

President at Gen. Halleck's office for conference. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Recognizes John E. Brown as vice consul of Denmark for Maine and C. F. J. Moder as vice consul of Denmark for Wisconsin. Washington Chronicle, 25 September 1863.

Exchanges telegrams with Mrs. Lincoln, who is preparing to leave New York. Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 22 September 1863, CW, 6:474.

Wednesday, September 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln on regular evening visit to telegraph office decides to withhold telegram to R. A. Maxwell. David H. Bates, Lincoln Stories Told by him in the Military Office in the War Department during the Civil War (New York: Rudge, 1926), 37; Abraham Lincoln to Robert A. Maxwell, 23 September 1863, CW, 6:475-76.

Sends to Gen. Rosecrans at Chattanooga copy of dispatch from Gen. Braxton Bragg (CSA). "You see he does not claim so many prisoners or captured guns, as you were inclined to concede. He also confesses to heavy loss." Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 23 September 1863, CW, 6:476.

Returns to city from Soldiers' Home late at night for cabinet meeting called by Sec. Stanton at War Dept. Reinforcements of all kinds to go to Army of Cumberland by rail in seven days. Orderly escorts President to Soldiers' Home after meeting. Flower, Stanton, 203-4; Hay, Letters and Diary.

Thursday, September 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President issues proclamation opening port of Alexandria, Va. Proclamation Opening the Port of Alexandria, Virginia, 24 September 1863, CW, 6:479.

Writes Mrs. Lincoln at Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, "a tolerably accurate summing up of the late battle between Rosecrans and Bragg," including death of Gen. Helm. Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 24 September 1863, CW, 6:478.

Friday, September 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President at War Dept. with Sec. Stanton ; does not attend cabinet meeting. Welles, Diary.

Writes communication to Gen. Burnside: "Yours of the 23rd. is just received, and it makes me doubt whether I am awake or dreaming. I have been struggling for ten days, first through Gen. Halleck, and then directly, to get you to go to assist Gen. Rosecrans in an extremity, and you have repeatedly declared you would do it, and yet you steadily move the contrary way." [Endorsed "Not sent."] Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 25 September 1863, CW, 6:480-81.

Directs Sec. Chase to examine claim for price of 1,100 bales of cotton alleged to have been delivered to government agents and converted into money. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 25 September 1863, CW, 6:481.

Saturday, September 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President very angry, and Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton disturbed, by report in New York Evening Post that heavy movement of troops has been ordered to relieve Army of Cumberland. Harper, Press, 133.

Confers with Attorney General Edward Bates on Missouri affairs. Bates, Diary.

Sunday, September 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President at War Dept. until 9 P.M. Gen. Hooker and John Hay visit him later at Soldiers' Home. Hooker to be given an assignment. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Lincoln orders Gen. Burnside to hold present positions and send spare troops to Gen. Rosecrans quickest way. Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 27 September 1863, CW, 6:484.

Monday, September 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President calls conference with Secs. Seward and Welles regarding British vessel "Arago." Later reads two confidential dispatches relating to Chickamauga. Welles, Diary.

Alerts Gen. Rosecrans that two small corps are on their way under command of Gen. Hooker. Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 28 September 1863, CW, 6:486.

Receives invitation to opening of new Grover Threatre with privilege of setting date and play. Grover to Lincoln, 28 September 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Mrs. Lincoln and Tad arrive home in afternoon from New York. Washington Chronicle, 30 September 1863.

Tuesday, September 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President addresses delegation of Sons of Temperance in East Room of Executive Mansion. Hay, Letters and Diary; Reply to Sons of Temperance, 29 September 1863, CW, 6:486-88.

Cabinet meets. "Neither Mr. Seward nor Mr. Stanton were present. They seemed, reasonably enough, to have given up attendance on these meetings of the Heads of Departments as useless; and, for ought I [Chase] see I may as well follow their example." Official Records—Armies 553.

Delegation from Missouri waits on President for interview to discuss removal of Gen. Schofield. Hay, Letters and Diary; Washington Chronicle, 30 September 1863.

Wednesday, September 30, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President grants two-hour interview to delegation of Radical Union men from Missouri and Kansas and receives petition asking removal of Gen. Schofield and appointment of Gen. Butler. Hay, Letters and Diary; Washington Chronicle, 1 October 1863; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 30 September 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Dr. Zacharie arranges afternoon appointment. Zacharie to Lincoln, 29 September 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln writes F. S. Corkran: "Mrs. L. is now at home & would be pleased to see you any time. If the grape time has not passed away, she would be pleased to join in the enterprize you mentioned." Abraham Lincoln to Francis S. Corkran, 30 September 1863, CW, 6:488.

Thursday, October 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President sets forth duties of Gen. Schofield in command in Missouri: 1. Advance efficiency of military establishment. 2. Arrest individuals and suppress newspapers when they are working injury to military. 3. Remove inhabitants en masse at own discretion. 4. Do not engage in returning fugitive slaves nor in enticing slaves from their homes. 5. Allow no one to enlist Negro troops except upon orders. 6. Allow no one to confiscate property except upon orders. 7. Allow only those qualified under Missouri laws to vote. 8. So far as practicable, expel guerrillas, marauders, and murderers. Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 1 October 1863, CW, 6:492-93.

President's nephew, John Todd Grimsley, fails to meet entrance requirements at Naval Academy. Washington Chronicle, 2 October 1863.

Sen. Sherman (Ohio) and Judge David K. Cartter visit Lincoln in support of delegation from Missouri and Kansas. Butler, Correspondence, 3:116.

Lincoln writes Gov. Bradford (Md.): "Please be here in person at 12. M. Saturday to fix up definitely in writing" the matter about slaves of loyal Marylanders being enlisted along with other Negroes. Abraham Lincoln to Augustus W. Bradford, 1 October 1863, CW, 6:491.

Advises Sec. Usher: "I suppose [Newton] Edmunds [chief clerk in surveyor general's office for Dakota Territory] better be appointed Governor of Dakota." Abraham Lincoln to John P. Usher, 1 October 1863, CW, 6:494-95.

Friday, October 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln writes Gen. Schofield at St. Louis: "I have just seen your despatch to Gen. Halleck about Gen. Blunt. If possible, you better allow me to get through with a certain matter here, before adding to the difficulty of it. Meantime telegraph me the particulars of Gen. Blunt's case." Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 2 October 1863, CW, 6:495.

Saturday, October 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President by proclamation sets last Thursday of November as day of thanksgiving. Proclamation of Thanksgiving, 3 October 1863, CW, 6:496-97; Washington Chronicle, 4 October 1863.

Confers with Sec. Welles on proposed instructions for naval officers. Welles, Diary.

Interviews Gov. Bradford (Md.) regarding enlistment of slaves of loyal Marylanders along with other Negroes. Bradford to Lincoln, 1 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Requests Gen. William Birney at Baltimore: "Please give me, as near as you can, the number of slaves you have recruited in Maryland. Of course, the number is not to include the free colored." Abraham Lincoln to William Birney, 3 October 1863, CW, 6:495.

Sunday, October 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln predicts outcome of rebellion to Gen. Rosecrans: "If we can hold Chattanooga, and East Tennessee, I think the rebellion must dwindle and die. I think you and Burnside can do this; and hence doing so is your main object." Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 4 October 1863, CW, 6:498.

Monday, October 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President, in answer to petition of delegation from Missouri and Kansas, declines to remove Gen. Schofield. Abraham Lincoln to Charles D. Drake and Others, 5 October 1863, CW, 6:499-504.

Receives September salary warrant for $2,022.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.

Tuesday, October 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President recognizes Niels P. Petersen as vice consul of Denmark for Illinois. Washington Chronicle, 9 October 1863.

In the evening, Lincoln attends a performance of Shakespeare's Othello, starring E. L. Davenport, at Grover's Theatre with his family and Private Secretary William O. Stoddard. The following day, the Grover's newspaper advertisement boasts, "THE GRAND REOPENING A GREAT SUCCESS. TREMENDOUS RUSH. OVER TWO THOUSAND PEOPLE UNABLE TO GAIN ADMISSION. THE PRESIDENT, THE SECRETARY OF STATE [William H. Seward], AND THEIR FAMILIES PRESENT." A newspaper reports, "The President had intended to remain only an hour, but was so pleased with the play that he stayed it out." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 6 October 1863, 1:3; 7 October 1863, 2:6; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 7 October 1863, 2d ed., 2:1; New York Herald, 9 October 1863, 7:2.

[W. H. Herndon deposits $213, possibly payment on Joseph Smith note, in Lincoln's account in Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165.]

Wednesday, October 7, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews P. Anthony Dey, engineer heading party surveying for western railroad, regarding military escort. Blair to Lincoln, 7 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Inquires of Gov. Johnson (Tenn.): "What news have you from Rosecrans' Army, or in that direction beyond Nashville?" Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 7 October 1863, CW, 6:505.

Thursday, October 8, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President suspends three executions. Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 8 October 1863, CW, 6:506; Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 8 October 1863, CW, 6:506; Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 8 October 1863, CW, 6:506.

Recognizes José Francisco Sanchez as consul of Venezuela at New York. Washington Chronicle, 10 October 1863.

Friday, October 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Mrs. Galez calls and asks that Frederick Wippermann, consul at Galatza, be transferred to Hamburg. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 9 October 1863, CW, 6:507.

Sec. Chase confers with President regarding reconstruction in Louisiana and urges that Gen. Butler be sent back to New Orleans. Butler, Correspondence, 3:120.

At 1:30 P.M. President receives invitation to attend celebration of Grand United Order of Odd Fellows in America at Israel Church on Capitol Hill. Committee to Lincoln, 8 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sends note to Sec. Stanton that Mrs. Thomas G. Clemsin, daughter of John C. Calhoun of South Carolina, asks permission to visit her son in prison at Johnson's Island, Ohio. "With your approbation, I consent for her to go." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 9 October 1863, CW, 6:507-8.

Saturday, October 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

In morning at Soldiers' Home, President speaks to soldier who requests discharge for lumbago. In afternoon, President publishes request in newspaper for unnamed soldier to see him again. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 10 October 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

President receives Lord Lyons, Rear Admiral Alexander Milne, and two other officers of British navy, escorted by Secretary of State Seward. Washington Chronicle, 12 October 1863.

General Meade reports there are reasons to believe enemy is moving into Shenandoah Valley. Lincoln telegraphs: "Am interested with your despatch of noon. How is it now?" Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 10 October 1863, CW, 6:509.

Sunday, October 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At 9:50 A.M. Lincoln telegraphs Gen. Meade again: "How is it now?" Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 11 October 1863, CW, 6:509.

Sec. Seward accompanies Miss Charlotte Cushman, actress who appeared frequently for benefit of U.S. Sanitary Commission, to White House for evening call on President. Seward to Lincoln, 11 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Monday, October 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln telegraphs Gen. Meade at 9 A.M.: "What news this morning? A despatch from Rosecrans, leaving him at 7/30 PM. yesterday, says 'Rebel rumors that head of Ewells column reached Dalton yesterday' I send this for what it is worth." Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 12 October 1863, CW, 6:510.

Describes military situation to Gen. Rosecrans at Chattanooga: "You and Burnside now have him [enemy] by the throat, and he must break your hold, or perish." Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 12 October 1863, CW, 6:510-11.

Interviews Mrs. Bowers of New Jersey, who has note of introduction from Secretary of the Navy Welles. Welles to Lincoln, 12 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln writes to Mrs. Alice C. Smith, of Boston, Massachusetts. He notes, "I shall have to acknowledge very briefly your letter informing me of the prosperity of your little boy whom you so kindly named after me. You may rest assured that my little namesake has my best wishes that he may grow to be a good man and a good citizen." Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Alice C. Smith, 12 October 1863, CW, 6:511.

In evening, plans to attend performance of Shakespeare's Macbeth at Grover's Theatre. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 12 October 1863, 2:1.

Tuesday, October 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

At noon cabinet meeting President reads dispatch from Gen. Meade stating that, if not attacked by Gen. R. E. Lee, he will attack Lee. Welles, Diary.

President informs I. W. McVeagh: "We have frequent despatches from Gen. Meade, and up to ten o'clock last night, nothing had happened giving either side any marked advantage." Abraham Lincoln to I. Wayne McVeagh, 13 October 1863, CW, 6:512.

Replies to inquiry of Cong. Moorhead (Pa.) regarding publication of military dispatches by saying: "Not unless you think it necessary." Abraham Lincoln to James K. Moorhead, 13 October 1863, CW, 6:512.

Wednesday, October 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President telegraphs Gov. Curtin (Pa.) regarding election returns: "How does it stand." Abraham Lincoln to Andrew G. Curtin, [14 October] 186[3], CW, 6:513.

Sec. Welles at White House congratulates President on election results in Pennsylvania and Ohio. Welles, Diary.

President recognizes Esteban Roberts as consul of Republic of Chile at New York. Washington Chronicle, 16 October 1863.

Exchanges cordial letters with Thurlow Weed: "I am sure if we could meet we would not part with any unpleasant impression on either side." Abraham Lincoln to Thurlow Weed, 14 October 1863, CW, 6:513-14.

Thursday, October 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President discusses political situation while visiting telegraph office and makes tabulation to show presidential election will be close. William B. Hesseltine, Lincoln and the War Governors (New York: Knopf, 1948), 351.

Postpones execution of Dr. David M. Wright to October 23. "This is intended for his preparation and is final." Abraham Lincoln to John G. Foster, 15 October 1863, CW, 6:514.

Issues pass: "Allow Mrs. Robert S. Todd [step-mother of Mrs. Lincoln], widow, to go south and bring her daughter, Mrs. Genl B. Hardin Helm, with her children, North to Kentucky." Abraham Lincoln to Lyman B. Todd, 15 October 1863, CW, 6:517.

[Irwin withdraws $9 from Springfield Marine Bank, semiannual payment of interest on scholarship at Illinois State University. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]

Lincoln writes an order to Sec. Stanton : "This lady, Abigail C. Berea, had a husband and three sons in the war, and has been a nurse herself, without pay"; and asks to have her youngest son discharged because of poor health. "Let it be done." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 15 October 1863, CW, 6:516.

Friday, October 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Mrs. Elizabeth J. Platt of New Jersey calls and asks for son's discharge. [Lincoln orders it five days later.] Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 16 October 1863, CW, 6:520.

At cabinet meeting President reads his answer to petition from Missouri and Kansas delegation. Bates, Diary.

Also reads to cabinet confidential dispatch to Gen. Meade urging him to fight Gen. R. E. Lee. Welles, Diary.

Writes Gen. Halleck: "If Gen. Meade can now attack him [Lee] on a field no worse than equal for us, and will do so with all the skill and courage, which he, his officers and men possess, the honor will be his if he succeeds, and the blame may be mine if he fails." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 16 October 1863, CW, 6:518-19.

On behalf of Mrs. Elizabeth E. Hutter, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Lincoln writes a letter of introduction to Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs. Lincoln explains, "Please see Mrs. Hutter, who has given most of her time to the soldiers, during the war, and who wishes to present an invention of hers for the soldier's comfort, which she would like to have introduced into the service . . . I certainly would prefer having it over my ears in cold weather, to their being naked." Abraham Lincoln to Montgomery C. Meigs, 16 October 1863, CW, 6:519.

Writes T. W. Sweney: "Tad is teasing me to have you forward his pistol to him." Abraham Lincoln to Thomas W. Sweney, 16 October 1863, CW, 6:520-21.

Receives from Capt. Diller a further report on gunpowder. Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 16 October 1863, CW, 6:521.

Saturday, October 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President confers with former Cong. Stanton (Tenn.) and Henry T. Hulbert of Tennessee regarding taxes due city of Memphis, Tenn. Hulbert to Lincoln, 19 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Issues proclamation calling for 300,000 volunteers. Proclamation Calling for 300,000 Volunteers, 17 October 1863, CW, 6:523-24.

Recognizes G. H. Garlichs as consul of Grand Duchy of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach for Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Washington Chronicle, 20 October 1863.

Declines offer of William B. Thomas, manufacturer and abolitionist of Philadelphia, to supply 10,000 men for 60 or 90 days to protect Washington. Abraham Lincoln to William B. Thomas, 17 October 1863, CW, 6:525.

Answers plea of John Williams and Nathaniel G. Taylor of Knoxville against withdrawal of U.S. forces from upper East Tennessee. "You do not estimate the holding of East Tennessee more highly than I do. There is no absolute purpose of withdrawing our forces from it; and only a contingent one to withdraw them temporarily, for the purpose of not losing the position permanently." Abraham Lincoln to John Williams and Nathaniel G. Taylor, 17 October 1863, CW, 6:525.

In the evening, President Lincoln, his wife Mary, their son Tad, and Lincoln's secretary William O. Stoddard attend a benefit performance of William Shakespeare's Macbeth at Grover's Theatre. Owner Leonard Grover stages the play, which stars James Wallack as Macbeth, Charlotte Cushman as Lady Macbeth, and Edward Davenport as Macduff. A newspaper reports that the Lincoln party "occupied the lower stage boxes to the right." The benefit garners $2,018 for the United States Sanitary Commission, whose members tend to the needs of the soldiers. The newspaper adds, "Mr. Grover. . . gave the use of the entire resources of his establishment for this benefit, (including the services of two stars at his own expense,) and Miss Cushman generously contributed her valuable aid to the same object." Evening Star (Washington, D. C.), 17 October 1863, 1:4, 3:1; 19 October 1863, 2:2; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 19 October 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Sunday, October 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln interviews Henry Tanner of Buffalo, N.Y., who seeks appointment for son. Tanner to Lincoln, 19 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Receives report of John Hay on conference with former Gov. Dennison (Ohio) concerning tendency of public opinion in West. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Monday, October 19, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President informs John Hay that General Rosecrans will be removed and General Thomas will replace him. Hay, Letters and Diary.

General Milroy at White House for morning conference with President. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 19 October 1863, 2d ed., 2:5.

[Irwin deposits in Springfield Marine Bank $25, payment on J. K. and Thomas Lewis note. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165.]

President answers demand of Governor Gamble (Mo.) that U.S. forces maintain integrity of state government, by pointing out that domestic violence apprehended by governor is not imminent and that General Schofield is instructed to suppress such violence. Abraham Lincoln to Hamilton R. Gamble, 19 October 1863, CW, 6:526-28.

Tuesday, October 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President meets with Major General Daniel E. Sickles, probably regarding estate known as Panoche Grande, Calif., of which Sickles is part owner. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 20 October 1863, 2d ed., 2:4; Abraham Lincoln to Daniel E. Sickles, 22 August 1863, CW, 6:402.

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

President confers with Thomas C. Durant, New York promoter of Union Pacific Railroad, about surveying plans. Durant to Lincoln, 17 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Approves in letter to W. S. Rowland idea of creating National Rifle Corps. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Remarks to Atty. Gen. Bates: "I have no friend in Missouri." Bates to Lincoln, 22 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Wednesday, October 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Delegation from St. Mary's County, Md., protests to President against disturbance caused by Negro troops stationed on Patuxent River. Lincoln replies that he thinks he will order withdrawal of troops. He further thinks that Negroes may be recruited in Maryland by consent of masters. Reply to Maryland Slaveholders, 21 October 1863, CW, 6:529-30.

Inquires of Gen. Schenck: "A delegation is here saying that our armed colored troops are at many if not all the landings on the Patuxent river, and by their presence, with arms in their hands, are frightening quiet people, and producing great confusion. Have they been sent there by any order? and if so, for what reason?" Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 21 October 1863, CW, 6:530.

Thursday, October 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President addresses members of New School Presbyterian Synod during their visit to White House. Remarks to New School Presbyterians, 22 October 1863, CW, 6:531-32; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 22 October 1863, 2d ed. 2:4-5.

Comments on speech delivered by Postmaster Gen. Blair at Rockville, Md. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Confers with Sen. Reverdy Johnson (Md.) and Gov. Bradford (Md.) on matters of suffrage. Bradford to Lincoln, 31 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sends for Gen. Schenck: "Please come over here. The fact of one of our officers being killed on the Patuxent, is a specimen of what I would avoid. It seems to me we could send white men to recruit better than to send negroes, and thus inaugerate [sic] homicides on punctillio." Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 22 October 1863, CW, 6:532.

Friday, October 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

10 A.M. President consults with Gen. Schenck about recruiting Negroes in Maryland and murder by John H. Sothoron and son, secessionists, of Lt. Eben White, recruiting officer, at Benedict, Md. Schenck to Lincoln, 22 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 21 October 1863, CW, 6:530.

"Only a portion of the Cabinet present and but little done. The Missouri difficulty discussed." Welles, Diary.

President converses with John R. Briggs, Jr., assistant clerk of House of Representatives, regarding election results. Briggs to Lincoln, 24 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Saturday, October 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President acknowledges receipt of medal from Union League of Philadelphia, by which he becomes an honorary member. Abraham Lincoln to George H. Boker, 24 October 1863, CW, 6:533-34.

Suggests to Gen. Halleck that Army of Potomac "with all possible expedition" get ready to attack Gen. R. E. Lee. Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 24 October 1863, CW, 6:534-35.

At 2 P.M. in White House replies to address by moderator of Baltimore Presbyterian Synod. Remarks to Baltimore Presbyterian Synod: Two Versions, 24 October 1863, CW, 6:535-36; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 24 October 1863, 2d ed., 2:5-6.

About 3 P.M. visits Government Printing Office, North Capitol and H Sts. NW., on invitation of Supt. John D. Defrees, and speaks briefly to employees. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 26 October 1863, 2d ed., 3:1; Washington Chronicle, 25 October 1863.

Confers with Sec. Chase about appointment of former Gov. Israel Washburn, Jr., (Maine) to collectorship at Portland, Maine. Chase to Lincoln, 24 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Comments on difference of outlook in dispatches from Gens. Rosecrans and Thomas. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Sunday, October 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

In afternoon President discusses with Gen. Alfred H. Terry and Col. Joseph R. Hawley proposals for attacking Charleston. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Monday, October 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln gives original draft of Emancipation Proclamation to ladies having charge of Northwestern Fair for Sanitary Commission in Chicago. Abraham Lincoln to Ladies in Charge of Northwestern Fair, 26 October 1863, CW, 6:539-40.

Lincoln writes to Congressman Elihu B. Washburne, of Galena, Illinois. Washburne urged Lincoln "to let some of your confidential friends know your wishes and feelings" about running for re-election. Washburne informed Lincoln that their mutual friend Thompson Campbell, a California state legislator, supports Lincoln's candidacy. Lincoln responds, "Thanks to both you and . . . Campbell, for your kind words and intentions. A second term would be a great honor and a great labor, which together, perhaps I would not decline, if tendered." Elihu B. Washburne to Abraham Lincoln, 12 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Elihu B. Washburne, 26 October 1863, CW, 6:540-41.

Postmaster Gen. Blair delivers to Lincoln letter containing charges against Alexander Montgomery. Montgomery to Blair, 24 October 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln writes Sec. Chase: "The writer of the accompanying letter is one of Mrs. L[incoln]'s numerous cousins. . . . I know not a thing about his loyalty beyond what he says. Supposing he is loyal, can any of his requests be granted?" Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 26 October 1863, CW, 6:537-38.

Approves courtmartial proceedings in case of Capt. James M. Cutts, Jr., brother of late Sen. Douglas' (Ill.) second wife, and remits sentence. Writes reprimand [that may have been delivered in personal interview]: "You have too much of life yet before you, and have shown too much of promise as an officer, for your future to be lightly surrendered. . . . No man resolved to make the most of himself, can spare time for personal contention." Abraham Lincoln to James M. Cutts, Jr., 26 October 1863, CW, 6:538-39. [See July 18, 1863.]

In evening, President and Tad go to see the comedies Handy Andy and A Lesson for Husbands, starring Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Florence at Grover's Theatre. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 26 October 1863, 2d ed., 3:5, 27 October 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Tuesday, October 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln's opinion, based apparently upon "Review of the Judge Advocate General of the Record of the Court of Inquiry Relative to the Evacuation of Winchester by the command of Maj. Gen. R. H. Milroy," is that no courtmartial "is deemed necessary or proper in the case." Opinion on the Loss of Robert H. Milroy's Division, [27 October 1863], CW, 6:541-42.

Wednesday, October 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President telegraphs Gov. Johnson (Tenn.): "If not too inconvenient, please come at once, and have a personal consultation with me." Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 28 October 1863, CW, 6:543.

Lincoln writes to commander of the Department of the Missouri General John M. Schofield and asks him to investigate claims "that the Federal and State authorities are arming the disloyal, and disarming the loyal." Lincoln reviewed "three communications . . . and . . . a large number of affidavits . . . [that] show by name, forty two persons, as disloyal, who have been armed." Lincoln finds no evidence to substantiate the claims. He asks Schofield "to give special attention to this region, particularly on election day. Prevent violence from whatever quarter; and see that the soldiers themselves, do no wrong." Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 28 October 1863, CW, 6:543-45.

Thursday, October 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President replies to speech made by Matias Romero as envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of Mexico. Reply to Matias Romero, 29 October 1863, CW, 6:548-49; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 30 October 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Contributes to efforts of former Cong. Etheridge (Tenn.) to retain job as clerk of House of Representatives. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Writes Sen. Grimes (Iowa) and Vice President Hamlin regarding act approved March 3, 1863, likely to affect credentials of Representatives from their States. Abraham Lincoln to James W. Grimes, 29 October 1863, CW, 6:546-47; Abraham Lincoln to Hannibal Hamlin, 29 October 1863, CW, 6:547-48.

Friday, October 30, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln interviews George I. Bergen, former resident of Springfield, Ill., and directs him to Gen. Stoneman. Abraham Lincoln to George Stoneman, 30 October 1863, CW, 6:551.

President and Mrs. Lincoln visit Ford's Theatre on occasion of Maggie Mitchell's penultimate performance of Fanchon, the Cricket. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 31 October 1863, 2d ed., 2:2; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 31 October 1863, 2d ed., 3:1.

Saturday, October 31, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President continues to notify congressmen-elect of provisions relating to credentials in act approved March 3, 1863. Abraham Lincoln to William Sprague, 31 October 1863, CW, 6:552-53.

Sunday, November 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President reports night fighting of Gen. Hooker to Sec. Seward, who is in Auburn, N.Y., because of illness of son. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 1 November 1863, CW, 6:554.

In evening consults with Gen. Schenck, Cong. James A. Garfield (Ohio), and Cong. Kelley (Pa.) about orderly Maryland elections November 4, 1863. Hay, Letters and Diary; Schenck to Stanton, 1 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Prepares order concerning draft: "It is ordered that every citizen who has paid the $300 commutation shall receive the same credit therefor as if he had furnished a substitute, and is exonerated from military service for the time for which he was drafted, to wit, for three years." Order Concerning the Draft, [1 November 1863], CW, 6:553-54.

Monday, November 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Through Postmaster Gen. Blair, Lincoln advises Cong. Blair (Mo.) to return to army if not elected Speaker of House of Representatives. Abraham Lincoln to Montgomery Blair, 2 November 1863, CW, 6:554-55.

Interviews Cong. Kelley (Pa.) regarding speech of Postmaster Gen. Blair. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Receives David Barclay, Pennsylvania attorney with introduction from Asst. Atty. Gen. Coffey. Coffey to Lincoln, 2 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Confers with General Schenck about possible violence at Maryland polls on election day, November 4, 1863. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Recognizes M. E. Rodriguez as consul of Mexican Republic at San Francisco. Washington Chronicle, 4 November 1863.

Judge David Wills of Gettysburg invites President to dedicate National Cemetery at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863 with "few appropriate remarks." Wills to Lincoln, 2 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Writes Gov. Bradford (Md.) that first of three propositions in Schenck's Order No. 53 is revoked because it is too liable to abuse. "He assures me it is almost certain that violence will be used at some of the voting places on election day, unless prevented by his provostguards. . . . My order . . . assures the right of voting to all loyal men; and whether a man is loyal . . . [is] fix[ed] by his own oath. . . . In this struggle for the nation's life, I can not so confidently rely on those whose elections may have depended upon disloyal votes." Abraham Lincoln to Augustus W. Bradford, 2 November 1863, CW, 6:555-56; Abraham Lincoln to Augustus W. Bradford, 2 November 1863, CW, 6:556-58.

Assures J. H. Hackett who allowed Lincoln's letter to him to be published in newspaper: "My note to you I certainly did not expect to see in print; yet I have not been much shocked by the newspaper comments upon it. Those comments constitute a fair specimen of what has occurred to me through life. I have endured a great deal of ridicule without much malice; and have received a great deal of kindness, not quite free from ridicule. I am used to it." Abraham Lincoln to James H. Hackett, 2 November 1863, CW, 6:558-59.

[First appearance by "the young and distinguished tragedian," John Wilkes Booth, in Shakespeare's Richard III at Ford's Theatre. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 31 October 1863, 2d ed., 3:5; 2 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:2, 3:2, 5; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 3 November 1863, 2:1.]

Tuesday, November 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President recognizes G. Papendick as consul of Hanover at Boston. Washington Chronicle, 9 November 1863.

Appoints confidential secretary of Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase, H. G. Plantz, as U.S. attorney for Southern District of Florida. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 3 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

William Evans, English liberal in America to study democratic government, visits Lincoln. John M. Forbes, Letters and Recollections of John Murray Forbes, 2 vols. (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1899), 2:76-78.

Lincoln writes Sec. Seward in Auburn, N.Y.: "Nothing new. Despatches up to twelve last night, from Chattanooga show all quiet and doing well. How is your son?" Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 3 November 1863, CW, 6:562.

Lincoln writes to the commander of the Army of the Potomac General George Meade and requests more information concerning Private Samuel Wellers with the 49th Pennsylvania Volunteers. Lincoln explains, "Wellers . . . writes that he is to be shot for desertion on the 6th . . . His own story is rather a bad one, and yet he tells it so frankly, that I am some what interested in him. Has he been a good soldier, except the desertion? About how old is he?" Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 3 November 1863, CW, 6:561.

Wednesday, November 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

[James L. Thomas hauls 19 loads of furniture from Soldiers' Home to the Executive Mansion, where the Lincolns must now be living for the cool season. DNA—RG 217, General Accounting Office, 148-947.]

Thursday, November 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President confers with former Cong. Benjamin F. Flanders (La.) and special agent of treasury regarding efforts to establish true state government and writes Gen. Banks of disappointment that nothing is being done. Abraham Lincoln to Nathaniel P. Banks, 5 November 1863, CW, 7:1-2.

Receives committee from African Civilization Society with petition asking for $5,000. Mitchell to Lincoln, 5 November 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Address to Lincoln, 5 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Rides over to Georgetown Heights in afternoon accompanied by John Hay. Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 116.

Receives October salary warrant for $2,022.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.

John Nicolay returns from Rocky Mountains, entirely restored to health. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 5 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Friday, November 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Secretary of State Seward telegraphs President from Auburn, N.Y., that he returns to duty November 7, 1863. William H. Seward to Abraham Lincoln, 6 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Saturday, November 7, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President confers with Judge Adv. Gen. Holt in morning about courtmartial cases. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Recognizes J. H. Goebler, Jr., as consul of Prussia at Boston, Carl Meising as consul of Principality of Schaumburg Lippe for U.S., and Juan Pico y Villanueva as consul of Spain at New York. Washington Chronicle, 12 November 1863.

Thurlow Weed presents to President four-point plan concerning amnesty. Thurlow W. Barnes, ed., Life of Thurlow Weed including his Autobiography and a Memoir, 2 vols. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1884), 2:438.

Sunday, November 8, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

A. Gardner photographs Lincoln. Frederick H. Meserve and Carl Sandburg, The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1944), 8 November 1863.

President is photographed with John Nicolay and John Hay. Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 117.

Replies to request of committee of merchants and citizens of New York: "I shall be happy to give the interview to the committee as you request." Abraham Lincoln to William B. Astor and Robert B. Roosevelt, 8 November 1863, CW, 7:4.

Monday, November 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Gen. Butler's wife calls on Mrs. Lincoln, who is absent, and receives greetings from President. Butler, Correspondence, 3:139.

Committee of merchants and citizens of New York, headed by John J. Astor, Jr., Robert B. Roosevelt, and Nathaniel Sands, presents petition to President relative to Gen. Dix running for mayor of New York City. Astor and Roosevelt to Lincoln, 7 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to John J. Astor, Jr., and Others, 8 November 1863, CW, 7:5.

President and Mrs. Lincoln, along with private secretary John Hay and others, attend performance at Ford's Theatre starring John Wilkes Booth in The Marble Heart by Charles Selby. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Telegraphs Gen. Burnside at Knoxville: "Have seen despatch from Gen. Grant about your loss at Rogersville. Per-contra, about the same time [Gen. William W.] Averell & [Gen. Alfred N.] Duffie got considerable advantage of the enemy at and about Lewisburg, Va; and on Saturday, the 7th. Meade drove the enemy from Rappahannock-station, and Kellys-ford, capturing 8 battleflags, four guns, and over eighteen hundred prisoners, with very little loss to himself. Let me hear from you." Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 9 November 1863, CW, 7:5-6.

Lincoln writes to treasury department agent Benjamin F. Flanders, of New Orleans, regarding Louisiana's re-entry into the Union. Lincoln asks Flanders to ponder General Benjamin Butler's proposition that "a vote be taken . . . whether there shall be a State convention to repeal the Ordinance of secession, and remodel the State constitution." In Lincoln's opinion, "the act of secession is legally nothing, and needs no repealing." Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin F. Flanders, 9 November 1863, CW, 7:6-7.

Proposes that Judge Logan bring Mrs. W. H. Lamon, his daughter, to ceremony at Gettysburg on 19th. Lamon will act as marshal on occasion of dedicating cemetery there. Abraham Lincoln to Stephen T. Logan, 9 November 1863, CW, 7:7.

Congratulates Gen. Meade: "I have seen your dispatches about operations on the Rappahannock on Saturday, and I wish to say, 'Well done.' " Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 9 November 1863, CW, 7:7.

Telegraphs Maj. John E. Mulford at Fortress Monroe, Va. "Let Mrs. Clark go with Mrs. Todd." [Mrs. Lincoln is known to have used name "Mrs. Clark" when she wished to travel incognito.] Abraham Lincoln to John E. Mulford, 9 November 1863, CW, 7:7-8.

Tuesday, November 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President prepares order concerning export of tobacco belonging to foreign governments at peace with U.S. Order Concerning Export of Tobacco, 10 November 1863, CW, 7:8.

Writes Gen. Schofield at St. Louis for information on why he refused leave of absence to members in military service to attend legislature. Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 10 November 1863, CW, 7:8.

Wednesday, November 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln writes Secretary of War : "I personally wish Jacob R. Freese, of New-Jersey to be appointed a Colonel for a colored regiment—and this regardless of whether he can tell the exact shade of Julius Caesar's hair." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 11 November 1863, CW, 7:11.

Lincoln writes to Postmaster General Montgomery Blair, who forwarded a letter from John Crisfield, of Maryland. Crisfield complained about the actions of federal troops during the recent election. Crisfield wrote, "The interference of the military has frustrated the popular will, and placed men in power, who could not have been chosen at any fair election." Lincoln seeks proof of the alleged abuse and assures Blair that he "will call . . . to account" any military personnel who "violated, or transcended his orders." John W. Crisfield to Montgomery Blair, 8 November 1863; Montgomery Blair to Abraham Lincoln, 11 November 1863, both in Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Montgomery Blair, 11 November 1863, CW, 7:9-10.

President answers telegram of John Milderborger, of Peru, Ind.: "I can-not comprehend the object of your despatch. I do not often decline seeing people who call upon me; and probably will see you if you call." Abraham Lincoln to John Milderborger, 11 November 1863, CW, 7:10.

Thursday, November 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President attends wedding of Kate Chase, daughter of Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase, and Senator William Sprague (R.I.) for a few minutes without Mrs. Lincoln. Hay, Letters and Diary; "Castine" [Noah Brooks], Washington, 14 November 1863, in Sacramento Union (CA), 12 December 1863.

"Mr. Lincoln and most of the Cabinet were there [Chase wedding] and many General officers in uniform." Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC, 13 November 1863; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 13 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:5.

Lincoln requests J. D. Defrees: "Please see this girl who works in your [Government printing] office, and find out about her brother, and come and tell me." [Her brother, impressed into Confederate service, was taken prisoner by Union forces.] Abraham Lincoln to John D. Defrees, 12 November 1863, CW, 7:12.

Friday, November 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President responds in brief speech to presentation of gold-mounted hickory cane by Senator John Conness (Calif.). Reply to John Conness upon Presentation of a Cane, 13 November 1863, CW, 7:13; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 13 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Meets with Governor Andrew Curtin of Pennsylvania, probably in relation to upcoming visit to Gettysburg to dedicate National Cemetery. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 13 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:2.

Acknowledges message from E. H. E. Jameson, member Missouri Legislature: "Yours saying [B. G.] Brown and [John B.] Henderson are elected Senators, is received. I understand, this is one and one. If so, it is knocking heads together to some purpose." Abraham Lincoln to E. H. E. Jameson, 13 November 1863, CW, 7:13.

Saturday, November 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln interviews Governor Andrew Curtin (Pa.) and delegation interested in appointments. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 14 November 1863, 2:5.

Senator Henry Wilson meets with President and Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles in behalf of the mechanics and laborers in the Boston navy yard. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 14 November 1863, 2:5.

Withholds permission from General William S. Rosecrans to publish certain official reports of Battle of Chickamauga. Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 14 November 1863, CW, 7:14.

President's son, Tad, receives South American pony as gift from Col. Joseph B. Stewart whom he met while visiting New York. Washington Chronicle, 15 November 1863.

Sunday, November 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President's bodyguard, Marshal Lamon, announces program for dedication of National Cemetery at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863. Washington Chronicle, 15 November 1863.

Lincoln, accompanied by Noah Brooks, visits Gardner's Gallery and poses for photographs. Brooks, Washington, 285.

Monday, November 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews Gen. Richard Busteed (commission expired March 4, 1863) and nominates him to be judge in northern Alabama. Forney to Lincoln, 15 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Edward Bates, 17 November 1863, CW, 7:15.

Receives Commandant Isola and Lt. Martinez, from Italian ships docked at New York. N.Y. Times, 18 November 1863.

Confers with Senator Lafayette S. Foster (Conn.) in afternoon. Interviews visitors from Montreal introduced by Mayor Richard Wallach (Washington). Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 16 November 1863, 2:4.

Telegraphs Gen. Burnside at Knoxville: "What is the news?" Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 16 November 1863, CW, 7:14.

Tuesday, November 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President watches parade of 2,500 from Invalid Corps pass White House. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 17 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:5.

Presents elastic penholder to Atty. Gen. Bates and receives in return quill from Rocky Mountain Bald Eagle, pre-war gift to Bates from J. E. B. Stuart. Bates to Lincoln, 17 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

At suggestion of Sec. Seward, interviews Judge Duvall of Texas. Seward to Lincoln, 17 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Attends cabinet meeting. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 17 November 1863, CW, 7:15.

Discusses train schedule to Gettysburg with Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 17 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:1; LL, No. 1023.

Recognizes Frederick Hertel as consul of Kingdom of Hanover at Chicago. Washington Chronicle, 20 November 1863.

Issues order concerning Union Pacific Railroad fixing "so much of the Western boundary of the State of Iowa as lies between the North and South boundaries of the United States Township . . . as the point from which the line of railroad . . . shall be constructed." Order Concerning Union Pacific Railroad, 17 November 1863, CW, 7:16.

Alters original one-day schedule to Gettysburg arranged by Stanton : "I do not like this arrangement. I do not wish to so go that by the slightest accident we fail entirely, and, at the best, the whole to be a mere breathless running of the gauntlet." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, [17 November 1863], CW, 7:16.

In evening examines drawing of burial plot of National Cemetery at Gettysburg with William Saunders, designer. LL, No. 894.

Informs James Speed he has prepared about half of Gettysburg Address. John G. Nicolay, "Lincoln's Gettysburg Address," The Century Magazine 25:597.

Wednesday, November 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, and Gettysburg, PA.

President sad and depressed because Tad is too ill to eat breakfast and Mrs. Lincoln is hysterical. Monaghan, Diplomat, 340.

Writes note that William H. Johnson, his valet, will accompany him to Gettysburg. CW, 8:526.

President and party leave Washington at 12:10 P.M. on special train of four cars furnished by B. & O. Railroad. Washington Chronicle, 19 November 1863; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 19 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:2; Nicolay, Lincoln's Secretary, 175.

Party consists of John Nicolay and John Hay, Secretary of State William H. Seward and Secretary of the Interior John P. Usher, Postmaster General Montgomery Blair, several members of diplomatic corps, and foreign visitors, together with military guard from Invalid Corps and Marine band. General Schenck's staff boards additional car at Baltimore about 2 P.M. Hay, Letters and Diary; Washington Chronicle, 19 November 1863.

During ride to Gettysburg President relates number of stories and puts everyone at ease. Little girl presents flowers to President at one stop and receives kiss in return. Rice, 509-13.

Presidential party reaches Camden Station in Baltimore in 1 hour and 10 minutes. Train is transported to North Central tracks at the Bolton Station and leaves that station at 2:00 P.M. It proceeds on that line to Hanover Junction, Pa. Changes to Hanover Line for remainder of trip. Proceeds west to Hanover where "train passing east compelled the Presidential train to halt. . . . The President stepped upon the platform . . . and delivered one of the brief, quaint speeches for which he is celebrated. Said he: 'Well, you had the rebels here last summer . . . did you fight them any?' " Train is delayed 8 minutes at Hanover. DNA—WR, RG 107, Sec. of War Telegrams Received, J. W. Garrett to Stanton, W. P. Smith to Stanton, 18 November 1863; Philadelphia Inquirer, 21 November 1863; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 19 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:2.

Special train arrives about 5 P.M. in Gettysburg, where Lincoln is guest of Judge Wills. Washington Chronicle, 21 November 1863.

After supper Lincoln receives telegram from Sec. Stanton : "By inquiry Mrs. Lincoln informed me that your son is better this evening." LL, No. 1023.

At 10 P.M. 5th New York Artillery band serenades President at Wills house. After repeated calls Lincoln addresses crowd briefly. Remarks to Citizens of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 18 November 1863, CW, 7:16-17.

Singers from Washington and choir from Baltimore also serenade President. Washington Chronicle, 21 November 1863.

Announces in Washington newspapers that from this date until the meeting of Congress in December, he will be "unable to receive visitors, his time being fully occupied by public business." Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 18 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Thursday, November 19, 1863.+-

Gettysburg, PA and Washington, DC.

According to Nicolay's account, after breakfast at Wills house, Lincoln retires to his room, where Nicolay joins him, and completes preparation of his speech. John G. Nicolay, "Lincoln's Gettysburg Address," The Century Magazine 25:598.

About 10 A.M. President, dressed in black, wearing white gauntlets and usual crepe around hat in memory of Willie, leaves Wills house to join procession. Receives round after round of "three hearty cheers," and shakes many hands as crowd gathers. Washington Chronicle, 21 November 1863.

Thousands welcome President in Gettysburg. Weather fine. Flags in Washington at half-mast in honor of dead in cemetery at Gettysburg. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 19 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:6.

Gov. Curtin (Pa.), who arrived last evening with numerous important people on special train from Harrisburg, Pa., remarks to Lincoln about serenade given Gov. Seymour (N.Y.), and Lincoln replies: "He deserves it. No man has shown greater interest and promptness in his cooperation with us." Rice, 514.

President mounts "a magnificent chestnut charger." Monaghan, Diplomat, 341.

Rides in procession to cemetery. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Procession delayed; starts to move about 11 A.M. LL, No. 1425.

Head of procession arrives at speaker's platform inside cemetery at 11:15 A.M. President receives military salute. President and members of cabinet, with group of military and civic dignitaries, occupy platform. "The President was received with marked respect and a perfect silence due to the solemnity of the occasion, every man among the immense gathering uncovering at his appearance." Washington Chronicle, 20 November 1863.

Lincoln shakes hands with Gov. Tod (Ohio), who introduces Gov.-elect John Brough (Ohio), and takes his place between chairs reserved for Sec. Seward and Edward Everett, orator to make principal address. At 11:40 A.M. Everett arrives, is introduced to President, and program music begins. Washington Chronicle, 21 November 1863.

Once during Everett's two-hour oration Lincoln stirs in his chair. "He took out his steel-bowed spectacles, put them on his nose, took two pages of manuscript from his pocket, looked them over and put them back." Monaghan, Diplomat, 341.

About 2 P.M. Lincoln "in a fine, free way, with more grace than is his wont" delivers Gettysburg Address. He holds manuscript but does not appear to read from it. John G. Nicolay, "Lincoln's Gettysburg Address," The Century Magazine 25:602; Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 121; Address Delivered at the Dedication of the Cemetery at Gettysburg, 19 November 1863, CW, 7:22-23.

Pronounces his "r" plainly, does not speak like Southerner. Henry B. Rankin, Intimate Character Sketches of Abraham Lincoln (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1924), 285.

On platform, after speech, President remarks to Marshal Lamon: "Lamon, that speech won't scour! It is a flat failure and the people are disappointed." Lamon, Recollections, 173.

John R. Young, recording speech in shorthand for Philadelphia "Press," leans across aisle and asks President if that is all. Lincoln replies, "Yes, for the present." John R. Young, Men and Memories: Personal Reminiscences, 2 vols., edited by May D. Russell Young (New York: F. T. Neely, 1901), 1:69.

President decides to hear address by Lt. Gov.-elect Charles Anderson (Pa.) at 4:30 P.M. in Presbyterian Church. Meets "old John Burns, the soldier of 1812, and the only man in Gettysburg who volunteered to defend it." Burns accompanies him and Sec. Seward to hear Anderson speak. President's special train leaves Gettysburg about 7 P.M. and arrives in Washington at 1:10 A.M. on Friday. Washington Chronicle, 21 November 1863.

Lincoln returns from Gettysburg with a mild form of smallpox (varioloid) and remains under half quarantine in White House for nearly three weeks. Bates, Diary, 30 November 1863; Welles, Diary, Dec.

Friday, November 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sec. Usher informs President that grading of first 40 miles of Union Pacific Railroad was completed November 18, 1863. Hallett to Usher, 19 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln interviews Mrs. Anna S. King regarding husband, sentenced to be shot. Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 20 November 1863, CW, 7:25; Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 20 November 1863, CW, 7:25.

Exchanges letters with Edward Everett who writes: "I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes." Lincoln writes: "I am pleased to know that, in your judgment, the little I did say [Gettysburg] was not entirely a failure." Abraham Lincoln to Edward Everett, 20 November 1863, CW, 7:24-25.

Orders trial of Capt. Charles C. Moore before military commission for interference at polls in Maryland. Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 20 November 1863, CW, 7:26-27.

Reads to John Hay letter of Sen. Chandler (Mich.) relative to attitude of War Democrats toward Thurlow Weed, Sec. Seward, and Postmaster Gen. Blair. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Replies to Chandler's letter: "I hope to 'stand firm' enough to not go backward, and yet not go forward fast enough to wreck the country's cause." Abraham Lincoln to Zachariah Chandler, 20 November 1863, CW, 7:23-24.

Requests Sec. Stanton : "Please see and hear the Attorney General, and oblige him in what he will ask in regard to a niece of his who is in distress." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 20 November 1863, CW, 7:27.

In evening Cong. Colfax (Ind.) visits Lincoln. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Saturday, November 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln, ill with mild case of smallpox, quips: "Now I have something I can give everybody." Monaghan, Diplomat, 344.

"Old Abe has a well developed case of varioloid. I was with him an hour and a half the other day and we went over many things." Gaillard Hunt, Israel, Elihu, and Cadwallader Washburn: A Chapter in American Biography (New York: Macmillan, 1925), 230.

Converses in evening for more than hour with Cong. Colfax (Ind.) about Postmaster Gen. Blair and presidential candidates. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Sunday, November 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln receives N. B. Judd, minister to Prussia, who expresses desire to return to private life. Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 134.

In evening Sec. Seward reads to President dispatch from Gen. Cassius M. Clay (resigned), minister to Russia, on American politics, European diplomacy, and naval improvements of century. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Lincoln suggests to Sec. Stanton that some attention be given to case of J. H. Sothoron's family. [See October 23, 1863.] Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 22 November 1863, CW, 7:28.

Monday, November 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President, somewhat despondent over progress of Gen. Grant, takes "heart again" from success of Gen. Thomas in Tennessee. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Accepts resignation of General Robert C. Schenck, to take effect December 20, 1863. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 23 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Transmits to Sec. Seward contents of two dispatches, to effect that Gen. Burnside thinks he can hold Knoxville. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 23 November 1863, CW, 7:29.

Tad Lincoln still "quite seriously indisposed" with scarlatina, which he has had for a week. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 23 November 1863, 2:5.

[The Battles of Lookout Mountain (November 24, 1863) and Missionary Ridge (November 25, 1863) assure success of Grant's Chattanooga campaign.]

Tuesday, November 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sec. Seward confers with President relative to warning Spain not to interfere in Santo Domingo. Monaghan, Diplomat, 344-45.

President is relieved by evening report from Gen. Foster at Cincinnati on fighting at Knoxville. Hay, Letters and Diary; Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 24 November 1863, CW, 7:30.

Philadelphia News nominates Lincoln for President in 1864. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 24 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Holds an interview with Judge John A. Bingham of Ohio in the evening. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 25 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Wednesday, November 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President signs authorization: "During the temporary absence of the Secretary of War his duties will be performed by Assistant Secretary P H Watson." Authorization for Peter H. Watson, 25 November 1863, CW, 7:30.

Telegraphs Gen. Grant: "Your despatches as to fighting on Monday & Tuesday [Orchard Knob and Lookout Mountain] are here. Well done. Many thanks to all. Remember Burnside." Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 25 November 1863, CW, 7:30-31.

Lincoln expects war news in evening but retires to bed early feeling unwell. Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 128.

Thursday, November 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President confined to sick room, suffering from severe pains in the head. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 28 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:1; John Hay, Letters and Diary.

Gen. Meagher presents Pvt. Miles O'Reilly [pen-name of Charles G. Halpine] to President. New York Herald, 27 November 1863.

Friday, November 27, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President is prohibited by physician from receiving visitors or interviewing members of cabinet. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 28 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:1; New York Herald, 29 November 1863.

Saturday, November 28, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"The President is reported to be much better this morning." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 28 November 1863, 3d ed., Extra, 2:6; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 28 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Receives report on conditions at Libby Prison, Richmond, prepared by surgeons recently released. Washington Chronicle, 30 November 1863.

"The President's youngest son, who has been sick for some time past with scarlatina, was much better yesterday." Washington Chronicle, 28 November 1863.

Sunday, November 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"President Lincoln is much better to-day, and will be able to resume his office duties to-morrow or next day." N.Y. Herald, 30 November 1863.

Monday, November 30, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"President has been sick ever since Thursday [November 26]." Bates, Diary.

Lincoln still confined to bed but resumes work on message to Congress. Chicago Tribune, 1 December 1863.

Tuesday, December 1, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"President is steadily recovering from his indisposition, and it is not doubted that he will, in a day or two, be equal to the active resumption of his arduous duties." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 1 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Recognizes J. B. Gossler as vice consul of Austria at Boston. Washington Chronicle, 5 December 1863.

Wednesday, December 2, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln declines invitation to attend meeting at Cooper Institute to promote raising of volunteers. Abraham Lincoln to George Opdyke and Others, 2 December 1863, CW, 7:32; Washington Chronicle, 6 December 1863.

Baltimore American places at head of its columns name of Lincoln as candidate for President in 1864. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 2 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:2.

[Crowning section of the Statue of Freedom placed atop the U.S. Capitol dome. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 30 November 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.]

Thursday, December 3, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President ill with mild varioloid. "We are glad to say that he is in a fair way for speedy recovery." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 3 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

[Mrs. Lincoln arrives at Metropolitan Hotel, New York, in evening. Helm, Mary, 234.]

Friday, December 4, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

9:30 A.M. President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in New York: "All going well." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 4 December 1863, CW, 7:34.

Congs. Brutus J. Clay (Ky.) and Green Clay Smith (Ky.) present to President petition for release of Clifton F. Estill, prisoner of war at Camp Douglas, Ill., whose mother was active Union lady in Fayette County. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 4 December 1863, CW, 7:34.

President, still confined to room, is working on Annual Message to Congress. N.Y. Herald, 5 December 1863.

Saturday, December 5, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

10 A.M. President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln at Metropolitan Hotel, New York: "All doing well." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 5 December 1863, CW, 7:34.

Is toasted at banquet by city authorities to commemorate turning of Potomac water into aqueduct. Washington Chronicle, 7 December 1863.

Receives November salary warrant for $2,022.34. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.

Sunday, December 6, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in New York: "All doing well." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 6 December 1863, CW, 7:35.

Sends for Cong. Colfax (Ind.), nominated for Speaker of House by acclamation. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Confers with Colfax about plans of clerk of House of Representatives to give control of House to Peace Party by excluding members with old certificates. Memorandum, 6 December 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Monday, December 7, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

10:20 A.M. President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in New York: "All doing well. Tad confidently expects you to-night. When will you come?" Mrs. Lincoln replies: "Will leave here positively at 8 a.m. Tuesday morning. Have carriage waiting at depot in Washington at 6 p.m. Did Tad receive his book. Please answer." 7 P.M. President telegraphs reply: "Tad has received his book. The carriage shall be ready at 6 P.M. tomorrow." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 7 December 1863, CW, 7:35; Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 7 December 1863, CW, 7:35.

Issues press release on Union success in Tennessee and recommends that all loyal people assemble informally in churches and render homage to God. Washington Chronicle, 8 December 1863; Announcement of Union Success in Tennessee, 7 December 1863, CW, 7:35.

Refers to military situation at Knoxville and comments: "Now if this Army of the Potomac was any good . . . if the Army had any legs, they could move 30,000 men down to Lynchburg and catch Longstreet. Can anybody doubt, if Grant were here in command that he would catch him?" Memorandum, 7 December 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Tuesday, December 8, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President receives joint committee from 38th Congress and announces that Annual Message will be communicated to Congress tomorrow at 12:30 P.M. Senate Journal, 8.

Annual report describes past year as one of health, sufficient harvests, improved conditions in national affairs, and peace with foreign powers. Treaties with Great Britain have suppressed African slave trade and adjusted possessory claims in Washington Territory. Negotiations with Spain, Chile, Peru, Nicaragua, and Colombia have been satisfactory. Foreigners within lines of insurgents are classed as belligerents, and naturalized persons must serve in military. Condition of organized territories is generally satisfactory. Under sharp discipline of civil war, Nation is beginning a new life. Operations of Treasury during last year have been successfully conducted. Pay of Army and Navy promptly met. People have borne burdens cheerfully. Blockade is increasing in efficiency; but illicit trade is not entirely suppressed. Production of war vessels has created new form of naval power. Post office may become self-supporting in few years. In Dept. of Interior public lands are being taken up, legislation is needed for Indian system, consideration should be given to enlarging water connections between Mississippi River and northeastern seaboard. When Congress assembled year ago, tone of public feeling and opinion at home and abroad was not satisfactory. With emancipation and employment of Negro troops there is new reckoning. Crisis which threatened to divide friends of Union is past. Looking to resumption of national authority within states, proclamation of amnesty and reconstruction is thought fit. State governments set up under prescribed mode will be recognized. War power is still main reliance. Chief care must be directed to Army and Navy. Annual Message to Congress, 8 December 1863, CW, 7:36-53.

President issues Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction whereby: 1. Persons in rebellion, with certain exceptions, who take oath to support Constitution are granted full pardon. 2. Exceptions are civil, diplomatic, and specified defense agents of Confederate government, and persons guilty of mistreating Negro prisoners of war. 3. Governments reestablished as prescribed in rebellious states shall be recognized as free governments of such states. 4. President will not object to provisions adopted by reestablished governments in relation to freed people. 5. Proclamation has no reference to states wherein loyal state governments have been maintained. 6. Congress shall have sole right of admitting members representing reestablished governments. Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction, 8 December 1863, CW, 7:53-56.

[This proclamation is authority for pardons granted by Lincoln throughout remainder of war.] Lincoln sends "my profoundest gratitude" to Gen. Grant and his command for fighting at Chattanooga and Knoxville. Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 8 December 1863, CW, 7:53. Deposits in Riggs Bank November salary warrant for $2,022.34. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.

Nominates "Commander D. D. Porter, to be a Rear Admiral in Navy, on the Active List, from the 4th. July 1863." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 8 December 1863, CW, 7:56-57.

Recommends to Congress that "Capt. John Rodgers, U.S. Navy, receive vote of thanks" for skill and gallantry exhibited in engagement with rebel steamer "Fingal," alias "Atlanta." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 8 December 1863, CW, 7:57.

Wednesday, December 9, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"The President's Message will be read this morning in both Houses of Congress, at half-past twelve o'clock." Washington Chronicle, 9 December 1863.

Many call at White House to congratulate President on message to Congress. Lincoln says that only person who objected to message was Sec. Chase. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Thursday, December 10, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln telegraphs Gov. Johnson (Tenn.) at 10:30 A.M.: "I still desire very much to see you can you not come" Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 10 December 1863, CW, 7:59.

Transmits to both Houses of Congress report and documents relating to "An Act to regulate the diplomatic and consular systems of the United States." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 10 December 1863, CW, 7:59.

Lincoln's health much improved; he sees visitors with special business. Chicago Tribune, 11 December 1863.

Interviews Cong. Arnold (Ill.) in evening. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Friday, December 11, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"President Lincoln, we are happy to state, is now convalescent, and yesterday passed several hours in the transaction of official business." Washington Chronicle, 11 December 1863.

Telegraphs Gen. Schofield: "Please come to see me at once." Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 11 December 1863, CW, 7:61.

Pardons Edward W. Gantt, of Arkansas, guilty of treason incurred by serving as brigadier general in Confederate army. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 11 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:1; Jonathan T. Dorris, Pardon and Amnesty under Lincoln and Johnson: The Restoration of the Confederates to their Rights and Privileges, 1861-1898 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1953), 36.

Saturday, December 12, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sen. Alexander Ramsey (Minn.) and Capt. Thomas A. P. Champlin interview President regarding courtmartial of Champlin. Ramsey to Lincoln, 15 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President sees no callers today because of illness. Browning, Diary.

Notifies Sec. Stanton that resignation of Gen. Palmer was not accepted. "I do not want him to resign, unless there be some reason not yet known to me." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 12 December 1863, CW, 7:61.

Sunday, December 13, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln confides in O. H. Browning that Emily Todd Helm, half-sister to Mrs. Lincoln, is at White House and fact should not be made public. Browning, Diary.

Sends message to Gen. Schofield: "On the 11th. I telegraphed, asking you to come here and see me. Did you receive the despatch?" Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 13 December 1863, CW, 7:62.

Discusses Missouri affairs and seems inclined to remove Schofield and put Gen. Resecrans in his place. Hay, Letters and Diary.

In evening Gens. Sickles and Wadsworth call on President, who has special guest, James H. Hackett. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 14 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:1; Hay, Letters and Diary.

Monday, December 14, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln interviews former Cong. Samuel L. Casey (Ky.) and orders safe-conduct for him from Cairo, Ill. to Red River and return with any cargoes he may bring. Agreement Signed by Samuel L. Casey, 14 December 1863, CW, 7:62-63.

Restores all rights of person and property to Emily Todd Helm who takes oath of December 8, 1863. Amnesty to Emily T. Helm, 14 December 1863, CW, 7:63-64.

Declines to see Cong. Fernando Wood (N.Y.), who seeks amnesty for Northern sympathizers with rebellion. Memorandum, 15 December 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President and family visit Ford's Theatre with Assistant Secretary of the Navy Gustavus V. Fox to see James H. Hackett play Falstaff in Henry IV. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 14 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:1,15 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:4; Washington Chronicle, 15 December 1863.

Tuesday, December 15, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

"The President was able this morning to be in his office and attend to business." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 15 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Interviews Dr. Thomas Cottman of Louisiana relative to reestablishment of state government. Abraham Lincoln to Thomas Cottman, 15 December 1863, CW, 7:66-67.

Lays before Senate six Indian treaties. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:68; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:68; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:69; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:69; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:69-70; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:70.

Attends cabinet meeting. Welles, Diary.

Capt. Champlin returns to ask Lincoln to discharge penalty adjudged against him by courtmartial. Ramsey to Lincoln, 15 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln explains to Judge Ogden Hoffman, of San Francisco, that "oath in the proclamation of Dec. 8th is intended for those who may voluntarily take it, and not for those who may be constrained to take it, in order to escape actual imprisonment." Abraham Lincoln to Ogden Hoffman, 15 December 1863, CW, 7:67-68.

Attends Ford's Theatre, accompanied by John Nicolay, John Hay, and Leonard Swett, to see James H. Hackett play Falstaff in Shakespeare's Henry IV. Criticizes Hackett's reading of a passage. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Writes Mother Mary Gonzaga, Superior, Academy of Visitation, Keokuk, Iowa: "The President has no authority as to whether you may raffle for the benevolent object you mention. If there is no objection in the Iowa laws, there is none here." Abraham Lincoln to Mother Mary Gonzaga, 15 December 1863, CW, 7:67.

Transmits to Senate "certain information touching persons in the service of this Government." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 15 December 1863, CW, 7:70.

Wednesday, December 16, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

As public mark of esteem felt by U.S. for high character and steady friendship of John Bright, President pardons Alfred Rubery, youthful British subject sentenced to 10 years' imprisonment and to pay fine of $10,000 for aiding Confederacy. Pardon of Alfred Rubery, [16 December 1863?], CW, 7:71-72.

Confers for an hour with Congressman Fernando Wood (N.Y.), about amnesty for Northern sympathizers with rebellion. President's Amnesty Proclamation of December 8, 1863 is not specific with respect to Northern sympathizers. Chicago Tribune, 18 December 1863; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 16 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Lincoln interviews C. C. Fulton, introduced by Postmaster General Blair. Blair to Lincoln, 16 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Clement B. Barclay, of Pennsylvania, informs Lincoln that General John Buford cannot live through day, whereupon Lincoln appoints Buford major general in U.S. Army and Barclay carries news to dying hero. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 17 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:1.

Issues proclamation concerning discriminating duties of tonnage and imposts. Proclamation Concerning Discriminating Duties, 16 December 1863, CW, 7:72-73.

Lincoln writes to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton and requests safe passage for the widow and relatives of one-time Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur. Former judge advocate John Lee seeks Lincoln's help in returning Elizabeth Upshur, her sister, and grandson to Washington, D. C. Lee explains, "Before the war," the trio had been summering in the Virginia mountains, "and did not come back." Lee vouches, "They are...excellent and innocent people." Lincoln writes, "I am so repeatedly applied to for leave to Mrs. Upshur...that I shall be obliged if you will permit it." John F. Lee to Montgomery Blair, 22 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 16 December 1863, CW, 7:74.

Thursday, December 17, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Baltimore delegation of public men calls on President and asks that J. L. Ridgely be reinstated as collector of internal revenue. Memorandum: Removal of James L. Ridgely, 17 December 1863, CW, 7:75-76.

President transmits to Senate convention between U.S. and Great Britain relative to claims of Hudson's Bay and Puget's Sound Agricultural Companies. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 17 December 1863, CW, 7:76.

Submits to Congress proposition for establishing "Bureau of Emancipation" as proposed by Freedmen's Aid Societies. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 17 December 1863, CW, 7:76-77.

Justices of Supreme Court pay their annual visit to President. Washington Chronicle, 19 December 1863.

Benjamin P. Moore, Jr., introduced by Cong. Edwin H. Webster (Md.), interviews President and asks exemption from draft as conscientious objector. President gives him card to Sec. Stanton . Moore to Lincoln, 18 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Visits Ford's Theatre to see Shakespeare's comedy The Merry Wives of Windsor with James H. Hackett as Falstaff. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Introduces Joshua F. Speed and Joshua Tevis, of Kentucky, to Thurlow Weed, "and I think their mission an important one." Abraham Lincoln to Thurlow Weed, 17 December 1863, CW, 7:77.

Lincoln writes James H. Hoes, jeweler of Chicago: "I have received from the Sanitary Commission of Chicago, the Watch which you placed at their disposal, and I take the liberty of conveying to you my high appreciation of your humanity and generosity, of which I have unexpectedly become the beneficiary." [Lincoln received watch for gift of draft of Emancipation Proclamation to Northwest Sanitary Fair, where it sold for $3,000, making him largest individual contributor and award winner.] Abraham Lincoln to James H. Hoes, 17 December 1863, CW, 7:75.

Friday, December 18, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President believes Gen. Schofield must be relieved of command of Dept. of Missouri. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 18 December 1863, CW, 7:78-79.

Confers with Alexander M. White of Pennsylvania representing Gov. Curtin (Pa.). Bates to Lincoln, 18 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Attends second lecture on Russia by Bayard Taylor, former secretary to minister at St. Petersburg, at Willard's Hall. Washington Chronicle, 19 December 1863; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 19 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:6; John T. Stuart to Mary Stuart, 20 December 1863, Stuart-Hay Families Papers, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, Springfield, IL; Hay, Letters and Diary.

Requests Cong. Washburne (Ill.) to superintend preparation of medal for Gen. Grant. Gaillard Hunt, Israel, Elihu, and Cadwallader Washburn: A Chapter in American Biography (New York: Macmillan, 1925), 231; Abraham Lincoln to Elihu Washburne, 18 December 1863, CW, 7:79.

Saturday, December 19, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Sec. Seward reads to President another dispatch from Cassius M. Clay, abusing Emperor Napoleon. Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 139.

President and Mrs. Lincoln invite members of Congress, other public dignitaries, and officers of Russian vessels now in American waters to reception at White House from 1 to 3 P.M. The Marine Band provided music. Washington Chronicle, 19 December 1863; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 19 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:4; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 19 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

In evening Susan Carr Craig, of Arkansas, accompanied by Representative Henry T. Blow, calls on Lincoln and asks for pass for herself and husband to Arkansas to raise cotton on their plantation. President promises to have permission made out on Monday.Permit to Mr. and Mrs. Craig, 21 December 1863, CW, 7:83-84; John T. Stuart to Mary Stuart, 20 December 1863, Stuart-Hay Families Papers, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, Springfield, IL.

President asks Gen. Grant if, without embarrassment, Gen. Milroy could be assigned "a place." Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 19 December 1863, CW, 7:80.

Sunday, December 20, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President replies to Henry C. Wright, lecturing agent of Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society: "I shall not attempt to retract or modify the emancipation proclamation; nor shall I return to slavery any person who is free by the terms of that proclamation, or by any of the acts of Congress." Abraham Lincoln to Henry C. Wright, 20 December 1863, CW, 7:81.

Monday, December 21, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President interviews Cong. Calvin T. Hulburd (N.Y.) relative to deserters in Canada. Hulburd to Lincoln, 21 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Approves joint resolution tendering thanks of Congress and medal to Gen. Grant. Washington Chronicle, 22 December 1863.

Remains at War Dept. while decoders read message, intercepted in mail at New York, intended for Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of State (CSA). Bates, Telegraph Office, 71-72.

President informs Sens. Foster (Conn.) and Dixon (Conn.) he has sent up nomination of Henry Hammond to be marshal of Connecticut. Abraham Lincoln to Lafayette S. Foster and James Dixon, 21 December 1863, CW, 7:82-83.

Sends note to Gov. Peirpoint (Va.): "Please come up and see me to-day." Abraham Lincoln to Francis H. Peirpoint, 21 December 1863, CW, 7:83.

Comments, in letter to Sec. Stanton , on aspects of "strikes in the Ship-yards," social influence of St. Louis upon Gen. Pope, and future of Gen. Schofield. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 21 December 1863, CW, 7:84-85.

Tuesday, December 22, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President transmits to Senate two conventions between U.S. and Belgium relating to Scheldt Dues, imposts upon navigation in inland waters. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 22 December 1863, CW, 7:87.

Lincoln and Secs. Seward and Welles constitute cabinet meeting. Welles, Diary.

President recognizes Henry Préant as vice consul of Russia at Philadelphia. Washington Chronicle, 24 December 1863.

Interviews former Sen. Francis Gillette (Conn.) on recommendation of Sen. Sumner (Mass.). Sumner to Lincoln, 22 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Replies to petition from citizens of St. Louis: "I have never interfered, nor thought of interfering as to who shall or shall not preach in any church. . . . If, after all, what is now sought, is to have me put Dr. M. [McPheeters] back, over the heads of a majority of his own congregation, that too, will be declined." Abraham Lincoln to Oliver D. Filley, 22 December 1863, CW, 7:85-86.

Orders Gen. Gilman Marston, military commander at Point Lookout, Md.: "If you have a prisoner by the name Linder—Daniel Linder, I think, and certainly the son of U[sher] F. Linder, of Illinois, please send him to me by an officer." Abraham Lincoln to Gilman Marston, 22 December 1863, CW, 7:87.

Directs Sec. Welles to "suppress any further publication of any part of" correspondence captured aboard Confederate ship "Ceres." Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, [22 December 1863], CW, 7:87-88.

Wednesday, December 23, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln interviews William H. Craft, corporal in Co. C., 82d New York Volunteers, who fears arrest as deserter, and gives him protection back to Army of Potomac. Abraham Lincoln to Whom It May Concern, 23 December 1863, CW, 7:89.

Confers with Sen. Lane (Kans.) about affairs in Missouri and Kansas and about nomination of Gen. Schofield to be major general. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Relates dream in which he is among plain people. One of them remarks: "He is a very common-looking man." President replies: "Common-looking people are the best in the world: that is the reason the Lord makes so many of them." Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 143.

Lincoln has third interview with Sen. B. Gratz Brown (Mo.) concerning conditions in Missouri. Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 140.

Transmits to Congress report regarding claims of Peruvian citizens. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 23 December 1863, CW, 7:88.

Requests Sec. Stanton : "Please see this Lady who is a Sister to our gallant and brave friend, Gen. Reynolds, who fell at Gettysburg. Please oblige her if you can." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 23 December 1863, CW, 7:88.

Thursday, December 24, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Atty. Gen. Bates at White House for conference. Bates, Diary.

President clarifies status of Gen. Banks: "I have all the while intended you to be master, as well in regard to re-organizing a State government for Louisiana, as in regard to the military matters of the Department." Abraham Lincoln to Nathaniel P. Banks, 24 December 1863, CW, 7:89-91.

Friday, December 25, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln reads to John Hay and others article he wrote last summer upholding constitutionality and expediency of draft. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Suggests to Bayard Taylor that he prepare lecture on "Serfs, Serfdom, and Emancipation in Russia." Abraham Lincoln to Bayard Taylor, 25 December 1863, CW, 7:93.

Plans to extend practical benefits of Amnesty and Reconstruction Proclamation to people of rebellious districts. Record books will be sent to various points to receive subscriptions to oath. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Saturday, December 26, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President has audience with Baron de Stoeckl, to receive thanks of Imperial government for reception given Russian navy. Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 26 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:4.

Interviews David Clark, member-elect of Maryland Legislature, regarding imprisonment of former Gov. Thomas G. Pratt (Md.). Blair to Lincoln, 26 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Releases prisoner of war and writes to U. F. Linder: "Your son Dan. has just left me, with my order to the Sec. of War, to administer to him the oath of allegiance, discharge him & send him to you." Abraham Lincoln to Usher F. Linder, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:94; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:95.

Orders Judge Adv. Gen. Holt: "Let the Surgeon General [William A. Hammond] be put upon trial by a court, as suggested by the Judge Advocate General." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:93-94.

Writes Sec. Stanton : "Shall we go down the river to-morrow? And if so, at what hour shall we leave the wharf? and which wharf? Mrs. L. & Tad, perhaps would go. I am not at all urgent about it, & would not have you incur the least inconvenience for it." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:95.

Sunday, December 27, 1863.+-

Point Lookout, MD.

President and Sec. Stanton visit Gen. Marston and encampment of Confederate prisoners at Point Lookout. Hay, Letters and Diary; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:95.

Monday, December 28, 1863.+-

Point Lookout, MD and Washington, DC.

President and Secretary of War Stanton return from visit to prison camp at Point Lookout. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:95; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 29 December 1863, 2d ed., 2:4; N.Y. Herald, 29 December 1863.

Tuesday, December 29, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets in afternoon with Secs. Seward and Chase, and Postmaster Gen. Blair absent. Welles, Diary.

Delegation from Baltimore calls on President and protests removal of Joseph J. Stewart as collector for Second District. Memorandum Concerning Joseph J. Stewart, 29 December 1863, CW, 7:97.

President sends notice that he will receive army officers at New Year's Day reception at 11:30 A.M. DNA—WR RG 94, Adjt. Gen. Off., Letters Received, Box 711.

Wednesday, December 30, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President recognizes José Carlos Tracy as consul of Peru at New York. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 2 January 1863, 2d ed., 2:3.

Thursday, December 31, 1863.+-

Washington, DC.

President issues additional instructions to direct tax commissioners for district of South Carolina. Additional Instructions to Direct Tax Commissioners, 31 December 1863, CW, 7:98-99.

Lincoln meets with foreign minister Count Edward Piper, who represents Sweden and Norway. As the agent of King Charles XV, Count Piper presents Lincoln with a "volume containing engravings of the Royal collection of arms." Previously, Lincoln "presented to His Majesty, a pair of pistols, of American workmanship." Lincoln and Piper express "mutual good wishes . . . for the continuance of the cordial relations now existing between the two Governments." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 31 December 1863, 2:4.

Friday, January 1, 1864.+-

Washington, DC.

President and Mrs. Lincoln hold annual New Year's Day reception at White House. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 1 January 1864, 2d ed., 2:4.

Members of diplomatic corps begin to arrive at 10 A.M. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

At 11 A.M. official families pay their respects. Welles, Diary.

Mrs. Lincoln first appears at 11:30 A.M. to receive officers of Army and Navy. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Washington Chronicle, 31 December 1864.

Public reception begins at 12 M. and lasts until 2 P.M. Washington Chronicle, 1 January 1864.

Lincoln receives four Negroes, who wait in long line to be presented. Washington Chronicle, 1 January 1864.