Results 28 entries found

Saturday, February 1, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Sunday, February 2, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Monday, February 3, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Tuesday, February 4, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Wednesday, February 5, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Thursday, February 6, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Friday, February 7, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Saturday, February 8, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Sunday, February 9, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Monday, February 10, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Tuesday, February 11, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Wednesday, February 12, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Thursday, February 13, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Friday, February 14, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Saturday, February 15, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Sunday, February 16, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Monday, February 17, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Tuesday, February 18, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Wednesday, February 19, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Thursday, February 20, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Friday, February 21, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

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Saturday, February 22, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

President does not attend Washington's Birthday celebration at Capitol. Philadelphia News, 24 February 1862.

Tad Lincoln is sick. Browning, Diary.

At the request of the Cabinet and by Joint Resolution of Congress, public buildings are not illuminated this night from condolence for death of President's son. DNA—RG 42, Commissioner of Public Buildings, Letters Received; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 22 February 1862, 2d ed., 3:5.

Charles Edwards Lester calls in evening with Dr. Charles D. Brown, who embalmed Willie's body by new process. Lincoln looks in Green Room where body lies in state. Charles E. Lester, The Light and Dark of the Rebellion (Philadelphia, PA: n.p., 1863), 142-44; Charles E. Lester, Our First Hundred Years, 2 vols. (New York: n.p., 1875), 379n.

Sunday, February 23, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

President and Sec. Stanton in conference at War Dept. are interrupted by Gen. Butler with instructions from Gen. McClellan to go ahead with expedition to New Orleans. Apparently President is not in favor of it. Benjamin F. Butler, Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences . . . Butler's Book (Boston: A. M. Thayer, 1892), 335.

The Lincoln family mourns the death of Abraham and Mary's eleven-year-old son Willie, who died on February 20. A newspaper reports, "The . . . body of little Willie Lincoln was visited to-day by a number of the friends of the family. The body was laid out in a plain suit of brown clothes, with a blossom of mignonette [flowers] on his left breast. . . . The funeral will take place at two o'clock to-morrow afternoon. The youngest son [Tad] of President Lincoln is considerably better to-day." New York Herald, 24 February 1862, 5:2.

Monday, February 24, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

Rev. Dr. Phineas D. Gurley conducts simple funeral service for Willie Lincoln at 2 P.M. in East Room while body remains in adjoining Green Parlor. Large crowd includes cabinet officers, foreign ministers, members of Congress, and citizens in general. National Intelligencer, 25 February 1862; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 24 February 1862, 2d ed., 3:5; National Republican (Washington, DC), 25 February 1862, 2:1.

Robert Lincoln, and Senators Orville H. Browning (Ill.) and Lyman Trumbull (Ill.) accompany President to Oak Hill Cemetery, R and Washington Streets, Georgetown, where body of Willie is placed in William T. Carroll's vault. Browning, Diary.

Government departments closed because of funeral service for Willie Lincoln. National Republican (Washington, DC), 24 February 1862, 2:6; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 24 February 1862, 2d ed., 2:1.

U.S. Supreme Court also adjourns for the day, out of respect for the President's grief. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 25 February 1862, 3:5.

Tad Lincoln is "decidedly better." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 24 February 1862, 2d ed., 2:1.

Tuesday, February 25, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets and discusses paroling prisoners of war. Bates, Diary.

President approves Treasury Note (Legal Tender) Bill that results in issuance of "Greenbacks." N.Y. Times, 26 February 1862.

Gen. Butler calls on Lincoln before leaving Washington for Ship Island, Miss., and New Orleans. President tells him to get into New Orleans and thus break back of rebellion. Rice, 142.

Consults with Committee on Conduct of War in evening and hears its recommendations that Army of Potomac be divided into corps. Committee on Conduct of War, Report (1863), 1:86-87.

Transmits to Congress Russian documentation relative to "Trent" affair. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 25 February 1862, CW, 5:137.

Wednesday, February 26, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

President, by military order pursuant to act of Congress, takes over all telegraph lines. National Intelligencer, 26 February 1862.

Interviews Gen. McClellan, about to start for Harper's Ferry, Va. McClellan to War Dept., undated, 8981, George B. McClellan Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Submits to Congress correspondence with "the Major King of Siam," and asks proper place for deposit of gifts received. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 26 February 1862, CW, 5:137.

Tad Lincoln no longer on critical list. Mrs. Lincoln improving but still confined to her room. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 26 February 1862, 2d ed., 2:1.

Thursday, February 27, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

President appoints two-member commission to examine cases of state prisoners remaining in military custody. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 27 February 1862, 2d ed., 3:5.

Converses with Congressman William D. Kelley (Pa.) at White House about General George B. McClellan and Harper's Ferry, Va., secretary of war arrives at 7 P.M. with dispatches from McClellan. Long conference interrupted by entrance of General Randolph B. Marcy, McClellan's father-in-law and chief of staff. President, obviously dissatisfied with McClellan, says: "The general impression is daily gaining ground that the General does not intend to do anything." William D. Kelley, Lincoln and Stanton: A Study of the War Administration of 1861 and 1862: with Special Consideration of Some Recent Statements of Gen. George B. McClellan (New York: Putnam, 1885), 24-29; Notebook, 1862, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Nicolay, Lincoln's Secretary, 142.

Because of ill health General Winfield Scott declines appointment to Mexico as envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary. Senate Executive Journal, XII, 136; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 27 February 1862, CW, 5:138.

Mrs. Lincoln is ill today. Boston Advertiser, 28 February 1862.

Friday, February 28, 1862.+-

Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets. Discusses license to trade in seceded territory. Bates, Diary.

President visits Navy Yard and Arsenal. Elizabeth Edwards to Julia Baker, 1 March 1862, Ninian Edwards Papers, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, Springfield, IL.

Interviews Gen. McClellan on failure of program at Harper's Ferry, Va. Sen. Wade (Ohio) and Mil. Gov. Andrew Johnson (Tenn.) present. William D. Kelley, Lincoln and Stanton: A Study of the War Administration of 1861 and 1862: with Special Consideration of Some Recent Statements of Gen. George B. McClellan (New York: Putnam, 1885), 29.

Drinks tea with Elizabeth Todd Edwards, sister of Mrs. Lincoln, at White House during evening. Elizabeth Edwards to Julia Baker, 1 March 1862, Ninian Edwards Papers, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, Springfield, IL.

Issues order: "I hereby license and permit such commercial intercourse in all cases within the Rules and Regulations which have been, or may be, prescribed by the secretary of the treasury for the conducting and carrying on of the same, on the inland waters and ways of the United States." Order Relating to Commercial Intercourse, 28 February 1862, CW, 5:139.