Results 28 entries found

Friday, February 1, 1861.+-

En route and Springfield, IL.

Lincoln returns home, probably in late afternoon, after seeing stepmother in Coles County, Ill. Charles H. Coleman, Abraham Lincoln and Coles County, Illinois (New Brunswick, NJ: Scarecrow Press, 1955), 210.

In writing Sen. Seward (N.Y.) of meeting with Cong. Kellogg (Ill.) on January 21, 1861, he states: "On the territorial question—that is, the question of extending slavery under the national auspices,—I am inflexible. I am for no compromise which assists or permits the extension of the institution on soil owned by the nation." Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 1 February 1861, CW, 4:183.

Receives bronze medal of Henry Clay sent by Daniel Ullmann, New York attorney. Abraham Lincoln to Daniel Ullmann, 1 February 1861, CW, 4:183-84.

Accepts invitation of committee of citizens of Cincinnati to stop on way to Washington. Baltimore Sun, 4 February 1861; Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin Eggleston, Charles L. Moore, and A. McAlpin, 1 February 1861, CW, 4:182.

Saturday, February 2, 1861.+-

Springfield, IL.

Lincoln writes to the Louisville (Kentucky) Journal editor, George D. Prentice, who asked Lincoln to provide an advance copy of the inaugural address. Lincoln responds, "I have the document already blocked out; but in the now rapidly shifting scenes, I shall have to hold it subject to revision up to near the time of delivery." Abraham Lincoln to George D. Prentice, 2 February 1861, CW, 4:184.

Sunday, February 3, 1861.+-

Springfield, IL.

Lincoln interviews William Larimer, Jr., soldier and politician, and Mark W. Delahay, Kansas politician, who urge appointment of Sen. Cameron (Pa.) to cabinet. Larimer to Cameron, 6 February 1861, Simon Cameron Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Monday, February 4, 1861.+-

Springfield, IL.

President-elect receives delegation from Pennsylvania, which presses claims of former Gov. Andrew H. Reeder (Kansas Terr.), should Sen. Cameron (Pa.) withdraw from cabinet scramble. N.Y. Tribune, 5 February 1861.

Lincoln writes to newspaper editor and political insider Thurlow Weed, of Albany, New York. Lincoln seeks to dispel the notion that he endorses a candidate to fill secretary-of-state nominee William Seward's U.S. Senate seat. Lincoln admits that he discussed the matter with a New York state legislator, "but always with an express protest that my name must not be used in the Senatorial election, if favor of, or against any one. Any other representation of me, is a misrepresentation." Thurlow Weed to Abraham Lincoln, 28 January 1861; David Davis to Abraham Lincoln, 2 February 1861, both in Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Thurlow Weed, 4 February 1861, CW, 4:185-86.

Limits visiting hours from 3:30 until 5 P.M. Illinois State Journal, 4 February 1861.

Suspends cabinet negotiations and intends to do so until he arrives in Washington. Villard, Eve of '61, 60.

Accepts invitation of New York Legislature to pass through state en route to Washington. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin D. Morgan, 4 February 1861, CW, 4:185.

Tuesday, February 5, 1861.+-

Springfield, IL

Lincoln calls upon Horace Greeley, editor and publisher of New York "Tribune," presently on lecture tour, at Chenery House. They confer for several hours on government policy. Lloyd A. Dunlap, "President Lincoln and Editor Greeley," Abraham Lincoln Quarterly 5 (June 1948):96.

Receives another Indiana delegation supporting former Cong. Smith (Ind.) for cabinet. N.Y. Tribune, 6 February 1861.

Deposits $100 in Springfield Marine Bank and withdraws $10. Pratt, Personal Finances, 164, 175.

Writes check for $149. CW, 8:466.

Wednesday, February 6, 1861.+-

Springfield, IL

Lincoln accepts invitation of New Jersey Legislature to visit state capital on journey to Washington. Abraham Lincoln to Charles S. Olden, 6 February 1861, CW, 4:186.

Accepts invitation of citizens of Albany, N.Y., to visit their city en route to inauguration. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 6 February 1861, 2:4.

Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln (assisted by four of her sisters) hold farewell reception at home. Helm, Mary, 155-56.

Prior to their departure for Washington, D. C., Lincoln and his wife Mary host a farewell "reception" at their home. A newspaper reports, "The levee lasted from seven to twelve o'clock in the evening, and the house thronged by thousands up to a late hour. Mr. Lincoln received the guests as they entered and were made known. They then passed on, and were introduced to Mrs. Lincoln, who stood near the center of the parlors, and who . . . acquitted herself most gracefully and admirably." Another reporter writes, "Behind [Lincoln] on the sofa were his two little boys, about eight and four years of age respectively, the youngest of whom was as noisy as a cub wolf. After a considerable time, the noise of the little urchin attracted the father's attention. Thereupon, turning about, and stooping down . . . he had some of the pleasantest words for the little fellow, that can be imagined. Thereafter there was no noise while I remained. Mrs. Lincoln, who is a squatty, pleasant little woman, receives her visitors with an easy gracefulness that makes all feel comfortable." Sun (Baltimore, MD), 8 February 1861, 2:3; Illinois Daily State Journal (Springfield), 9 February 1861, 2:3; Henry County Chronicle (Cambridge, IL), 26 February 1861, 2:3-5.

"Reception announced for 7:00 to 12:00. Thousands came and it lasted longer." Henry B. Rankin, Intimate Character Sketches of Abraham Lincoln (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1924), 255-56.

Lincoln deposits $642.91 in Springfield Marine Bank and withdraws $392.12. Pratt, Personal Finances, 164, 175.

Writes check for 50¢ in payment of taxes on Lincoln, Ill. lot. CW, 8:466.

Thursday, February 7, 1861.+-

Springfield, IL.

Lincoln invites Orville H. Browning, attorney who later succeeds Stephen A. Douglas in U.S. Senate, to accompany him to Washington. Browning agrees to go as far as Indianapolis. Browning, Diary.

Declines invitation from people of Massachusetts to visit state for "want of time." Abraham Lincoln to John A. Andrew and the Senate and House of Representatives of Massachusetts, 7 February 1861, CW, 4:186.

Accepts invitation to visit Columbus, Ohio. Acknowledges invitation from citizens of Dayton, Ohio: "I will endeavor to pass through and at least bow to the friends there." Abraham Lincoln to William Dennison, 7 February 1861, CW, 4:186-87; Abraham Lincoln to John G. Lowe, Thomas A. Phillips, and W. H. Gillespie, 7 February 1861, CW, 4:187.

Withdraws $104.70 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 175.

Friday, February 8, 1861.+-

Springfield, IL.

Lincoln accepts invitation of Pennsylvania Legislature to visit Harrisburg. Also accepts invitation to visit Cleveland, Ohio. Abraham Lincoln to Darwin A. Finney and Others, 8 February 1861, CW, 4:188; Abraham Lincoln to George B. Senter and Others, 8 February 1861, CW, 4:188.

Member of Georgia Secession Convention tries unsuccessfully to exact from Lincoln positive committal on one of compromise propositions. Villard, Eve of '61, 64-65.

Lincoln family vacates home on Eighth St. and occupies rooms in Chenery House. Henry B. Rankin, Intimate Character Sketches of Abraham Lincoln (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1924), 258-59.

Lincoln withdraws $17.50 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 175.

Buys from Hartford Fire Insurance Co. insurance policy on house ($3,000), carriagehouse ($75), woodhouse and privy ($125) for premium of $24 per year. Pratt, Personal Finances, 70.

Saturday, February 9, 1861.+-

Springfield, IL

Lincoln and O. H. Browning discuss at Chenery House state of Union. Browning, Diary.

Lincoln receives gift of suit of clothes manufactured by Titsworth & Brothers of Chicago, to be worn on March 4, 1861. Also receives whistle made from pig's tail. Villard, Eve of '61, 68-69.

Carl Schurz, German refugee and political power, visits Lincoln briefly. Carl Schurz, Intimate Letters of Carl Schurz, 1841-1869, trans and ed. by Joseph Schafer (Madison, WI: n.p., 1928), 244.

Notes representing loans to residents of Sangamon County, Ill., payable to Lincoln, are left, probably on this day, with Robert Irwin, Springfield banker, for safekeeping. Receipt for Notes Left with Robert Irwin for Collection, [9? February 1861], CW, 4:188-89.

Lincoln deposits $75 in Springfield Marine Bank and withdraws $68.04. Pratt, Personal Finances, 164, 175.

Sells to Samuel H. Melvin, Springfield druggist, household furnishings worth $82.25. Receipt to Samuel H. Melvin, 9 February 1861, CW, 4:189.

Sunday, February 10, 1861.+-

Springfield, IL.

Lincoln spends day with Springfield friends. N.Y. Tribune, 12 February 1861.

In late afternoon discusses unfinished lawsuits with W. H. Herndon at their offices and requests that office sign, "Lincoln and Herndon," remain and that Herndon conduct firm's business until Lincoln returns. They walk together until near Lincoln's home. Henry B. Rankin, Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Putnam, 1916), 145, 220.

The day before he departs for Washington, D. C., Lincoln meets with his law partner William H. Herndon in their office. The two men go "over the books" and make plans "for the completion of all unsettled and unfinished matters." Herndon recalls that Lincoln looks at the law partnership's "sign-board" and comments, "Let it hang there undisturbed." William H. Herndon and Jesse W. Weik, Abraham Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, 2 vols., (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1902), 2:192-94.

Tells Herndon he had not thought there would be need for farewell speech. Henry B. Rankin, Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Putnam, 1916), 226.

Visits Carl Schurz in his room for another conversation. Carl Schurz, Intimate Letters of Carl Schurz, 1841-1869, trans and ed. by Joseph Schafer (Madison, WI: n.p., 1928), 247.

Monday, February 11, 1861.+-

Springfield, IL and Indianapolis, IN.

At approximately 7:30 A.M. President-elect leaves Chenery House without Mrs. Lincoln for Great Western Railroad depot, to start trip to Washington. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 12 February 1861, 3:6; Thomas D. Jones, Memories of Lincoln (New York: Press of the Pioneers, 1934), 16; Monaghan, Diplomat, 28.

Withdraws $400 from Springfield Marine Bank; deposits $82.25, payment by S. H. Melvin for certain household furniture. Pratt, Personal Finances, 164, 179.

Shakes hands with friends as they file by. At 8 A.M. boards train and in response to demands of crowd (estimated at 1,000) speaks from rear platform: "My friends—No one, not in my situation, can appreciate my feeling of sadness at this parting. To this place, and the kindness of these people, I owe everything. . . . I now leave, . . . with a task before me greater than that which rested upon Washington. . . . Trusting in Him, who can go with me, and remain with you . . . I bid you an affectionate farewell." Later, with aid of John G. Nicolay, he writes out farewell remarks at request of reporter. Illinois State Journal, 13 February 1861; Villard, Eve of '61, 70-73; Farewell Address at Springfield, Illinois, 11 February 1861, CW, 4:190-91.

Lincoln acknowledges greetings of people at number of stops during morning. At Decatur, Ill. moves rapidly through crowd at depot, shaking hands right and left. Illinois State Journal, 13 February 1861.

Makes brief remarks at Tolono and Danville, Ill. Baltimore Sun, 13 February 1861; Remarks at Tolono, Illinois, 11 February 1861, CW, 4:191; Remarks at Danville, Illinois, 11 February 1861, CW, 4:191-92.

At 12:30 P.M. train arrives at Indiana State Line where he is welcomed by committee of state legislature headed by Capt. Frederick Steele. Here Great Western joins Toledo and Wabash, and large numbers of Indiana politicians board train. At Lafayette, Ind., Lincoln says: "While some of us may differ in political opinions, still we are all united in one feeling for the Union. We all believe in the maintainance of the Union, of every star and every stripe of the glorious flag, and permit me to express the sentiment that upon the union of the States, there shall be between us no difference." Remarks at Indiana State Line, 11 February 1861, CW, 4:192; Speech at Lafayette, Indiana, 11 February 1861, CW, 4:192.

Greets people at Thorntown and Lebanon, Ind. Every station along route has its crowd. Remarks at Thornton and Lebanon, Indiana, 11 February 1861, CW, 4:192-93.

Arrives in Indianapolis at 5 P.M. At West Washington St. is officially welcomed by Gov. Oliver P. Morton (Ind.) and receives 34-gun salute. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 13 February 1861, 2:6.

Lincoln replies: "To the salvation of this Union there needs but one single thing—the hearts of a people like yours. . . . my reliance will be placed upon you and the people of the United States— . . . It is your business to rise up and preserve the Union and liberty, for yourselves, and not for me." Indianapolis Indiana State Guard, 16 February 1861; Reply to Oliver P. Morton at Indianapolis, Indiana, 11 February 1861, CW, 4:193-94.

Leaves train for carriage, remains standing, and joins procession of 20,000, composed of both houses of legislature, public officers, municipal authorities, military, and firemen, to Bates House, where he stays overnight. From balcony he says: "The words 'coercion' and 'invasion' are in great use about these days. . . . Would the marching of an army into South Carolina, for instance, without the consent of her people, and in hostility against them, be coercion or invasion? . . . But if the Government, for instance, but simply insists upon holding its own forts, or retaking those forts which belong to it, or the enforcement of the laws of the United States . . . or even the withdrawal of the mails from those portions of the country where the mails themselves are habitually violated; would any or all of these things be coercion? . . . What is the particular sacredness of a State? . . . I am speaking of that assumed right of a State, as a primary principle, that the Constitution should rule all that is less than itself, and ruin all that is bigger than itself. But, I ask, wherein does consist that right? . . . I am deciding nothing, but simply giving something for you to reflect upon." Speech from the Balcony of the Bates House at Indianapolis, Indiana, 11 February 1861, CW, 4:194-96.

At 7 P.M. begins greeting no fewer than 3,000 persons during impromptu reception in main parlor. Villard, Eve of '61, 75-79.

Becomes excited over temporary loss of satchel containing copies of Inaugural Address. Nicolay, Lincoln's Secretary, 61-65.

[See also February 15, 1861.]

Tuesday, February 12, 1861.+-

Indianapolis, IN and Cincinnati, OH.

After breakfasting at governor's mansion, Lincoln accompanies Gov. Morton (Ind.) to Capitol, where he exchanges greetings with members of legislature. William E. Baringer, A House Dividing: Lincoln as President Elect (Springfield, IL: Abraham Lincoln Association, 1945), 271-72.

Shortly after 10 A.M. he appears for third time on balcony of Bates House and, in response to crowd which had gathered, makes practically same remarks as on previous evening. Remarks from the Balcony at Bates House, Indianapolis, Indiana, 11 February 1861, CW, 4:196; Villard, Eve of '61, 79.

Welcomes Mrs. Lincoln and sons to presidential party and takes affectionate leave of old Illinois friends, Jesse K. Dubois and Ebenezer Peck. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 14 February 1861, 2:4; Villard, Eve of '61, 80.

Boards train at 11 A.M., escorted by governor and committee from legislature. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 14 February 1861, 2:4.

Meets welcoming committee from Ohio and Kentucky on train. Cincinnati Commercial, 14 February 1861.

Speaks from rear platform at Indiana towns of Morris, Shelbyville, Greensburg, and Lawrenceburg, during four-hour ride to Cincinnati. Baltimore Sun, 13 February 1861.

Arrives in Cincinnati shortly after 3 P.M., receives immense ovation, and is welcomed by Mayor Richard M. Bishop. Evening Star (Washington, DC), 14 February 1861, 2:4.

Rides in carriage with mayor, escorted by Washington Dragoon regiment, for two hours and arrives at Burnet House, where he addresses huge crowd: "I hope that, although we have some threatening National difficulties now—I hope that while these free institutions shall continue to be in the enjoyment of millions of free people of the United States, we will see repeated every four years what we now witness." N.Y. Tribune, 13 February 1861; Cincinnati Commercial, 13 February 1861; Speech at Cincinnati, Ohio, 12 February 1861, CW, 4:197-200.

Attends public reception in hotel dining room during evening. Goes to balcony at 8 P.M. and speaks to several thousand members of German Industrial Association: "I deem it my duty—a duty which I owe my constituents—to you, gentlemen, that I should wait until the last moment, for a development of the present national difficulties, before I express myself decidedly what course I shall pursue. . . . Mr. Chairman, I hold that while man exists, it is his duty to improve not only his own condition, but to assist in ameliorating mankind; and therefore, without entering upon the details of the question, I will simply say that I am for those means which will give the greatest good to the greatest number." Speech to Germans at Cincinnati, Ohio, 12 February 1861, CW, 4:201-3.

[Robert Irwin, employed by Lincoln to handle his financial interests in Springfield during his absence, withdraws $466.34 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 176.]

Wednesday, February 13, 1861.+-

Cincinnati, OH and Columbus, OH.

Lincoln and party, under escort of committee from Ohio Legislature, leave Burnet House at 8:30 A.M. in eight carriages for depot of Little Miami Railroad and leave city at 9 A.M. Lincoln makes short speeches at Ohio towns of Milford, Loveland, Miamiville, Morrow, Corwin, Xenia, and London. Remarks at London, Ohio, 13 February 1861, CW, 4:203-4; William E. Baringer, A House Dividing: Lincoln as President Elect (Springfield, IL: Abraham Lincoln Association, 1945), 274; Columbus Capital City Fact, 13 February 1861.

Arrives in Columbus at 2 P.M. Receives national salute; gets enthusiastic welcome from crowd of 60,000. Villard, Eve of '61, 80; Baltimore Sun, 14 February 1861; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 14 February 1861, 2:4.

At Capitol Lt. Gov. Robert C. Kirk (Ohio) introduces him before joint meeting of legislature. Baltimore Sun, 14 February 1861.

In Columbus, Lincoln speaks to Ohio's General Assembly. He acknowledges that he has revealed little about "the policy of the new administration." Lincoln explains, "In the varying and repeatedly shifting scenes of the present, and without a precedent which could enable me to judge by the past, it has seemed fitting that before speaking upon the difficulties of the country, I should have gained a view of the whole field . . . being at liberty to modify and change the course of policy, as future events may make a change necessary." New York Herald, 14 February 1861, 5:1-2; Address to the Ohio Legislature, Columbus, Ohio, 13 February 1861, CW, 4:204-5.

Speaks to public from steps of Capitol immediately following visit to legislature: "The manifestations of good-will towards the government, and affection for the Union which you may exhibit are of immense value to you and your posterity forever." Speech from the Steps of the Capitol at Columbus, Ohio, 13 February 1861, CW, 4:205-6.

At 4:30 P.M. receives telegram from Washington, informing him that he is duly elected President of the United States. Attends levee in full evening dress for members of legislature, army and militia officers, Lincoln party, and special guests at residence of Gov. William Dennison (Ohio). Baltimore Sun, 15 February 1861.

Returns to Capitol after supper and again receives public. Later accompanies Governor to Deshler Hall, where guards are giving military ball in his honor. Leads grand promenade with captain's wife. Columbus Capital City Fact, 14 February 1861.

Lincoln family spends night as guests at governor's home. N.Y. Tribune, 14 February 1861.

[Irwin withdraws $16.23 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 176.]

Thursday, February 14, 1861.+-

Columbus, OH and Pittsburgh, PA.

Lincoln and family leave governor's mansion at 7 A.M. under escort for depot. Cincinnati Commercial, 15 February 1861.

Train departs shortly before 8 A.M. with throngs of people standing under umbrellas waving farewells. Villard, Eve of '61, 83; Columbus Ohio Statesman, 14 February 1861.

Lincoln travels most of way to Pittsburgh in rain, but makes number of stops for speeches where crowds are waiting. William E. Baringer, A House Dividing: Lincoln as President Elect (Springfield, IL: Abraham Lincoln Association, 1945), 276.

Responds to welcome at Ohio towns of Newark, Frazeysburg, Dresden, Coshocton, Newcomerstown, Uhrichsville, Cadiz Junction, Steubenville, Wellsville, and at Pennsylvania towns of Rochester, Allegheny City, and Pittsburgh. Remarks at Newark, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:206; Remarks at Cadiz Junction, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:206; Speech at Steubenville, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:206-7; Remarks at Wellsville, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:207-8; Remarks at Rochester, Pennsylvania, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:208; Remarks at the Monongahela House, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:208-9; Remarks from Balcony of the Monongahela House, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:209-10; Cincinnati Commercial, 15 February 1861.

At Cadiz Junction Lincoln dines at Parks House; later remarks to crowd from platform of car that he is "too full for utterance." Remarks at Cadiz Junction, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:206; Columbus Capital City Fact, 15 February 1861.

Receives welcome from Judge Lloyd and approximately 10,000 people gathered around carpeted stage near railroad tracks in Steubenville. Replies: "We everywhere express devotion to the Constitution. I believe there is no difference in this respect, whether on this or on the other side of this majestic stream. . . . The question is, as to what the Constitution means— . . . To decide that, who shall be the judge? Can you think of any other, than the voice of the people?" Speech at Steubenville, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:206-7; Cincinnati Commercial, 15 February 1861.

Leaves Steubenville at 2:30 P.M. and shortly arrives at Wellsville where he makes brief remarks from platform of rear car. Escort committees from Allegheny City and Cleveland are on board. At Rochester Lincoln answers question, "What will you do with the secesssionists then?" by saying, "My friend, that is a matter which I have under very grave consideration." Remarks at Wellsville, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:207-8; Remarks at Rochester, Pennsylvania, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:208; Cincinnati Commercial, 15 February 1861.

Arrives at Allegheny City at 8 P.M., having been delayed two hours by broken-down freight train near Freedom, Ohio. Acknowledges welcome of mayor in rain and enters carriage for Monongahela House in Pittsburgh across river. ["We finally got Mr. Lincoln into a carriage; but . . . it looked for a while as if we would never get the carriage out of the crowd that was pushing and yelling all around us." Nicolay to Bates, 15 February 1861, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.]

Large crowds in rain and mud block streets to hotel and pack lobby. Standing on chair in lobby of Monongahela House Lincoln reflects: "I could not help thinking, my friends, as I traveled in the rain through your crowded streets, on my way here, that if all that people were in favor of the Union, it can certainly be in no great danger—it will be preserved. . . . Well, my friends, as it is not much I have to say, and as there may be some uncertainty of another opportunity, I will utter it now, if you will permit me to procure a few notes." Returns and announces he has been persuaded to finish speech in morning. Baltimore Sun, 15 February 1861; Remarks at the Monongahela House, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvnia, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:208-9; Remarks from Balcony of the Monongahela House, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:209-10.

Friday, February 15, 1861.+-

Pittsburgh, PA and Cleveland, OH.

At 8:30 A.M. Lincoln appears on balcony of Monongahela House, and delivers longest address of journey. Multitude of 5,000 stands in rain in front of hotel. Mayor George Wilson introduces Lincoln, who repeats remarks made in Columbus, Ohio then comments on tariff: "So long as direct taxation for the support of government is not resorted to, a tariff is necessary. . . . I have long thought that if there be any article of necessity which can be produced at home with as little or nearly the same labor as abroad, it would be better to protect that article. Labor is the true standard of value. . . . According to my political education, I am inclined to believe that the people in the various sections of the country should have their own views carried out through their representatives in Congress, . . . so that . . . adequate protection can be extended to the coal and iron of Pennsylvania, the corn of Illinois, and the 'reapers of Chicago.' " Lincoln visits Leonard Swett, elector-at-large from Illinois, who has been detained at hotel several weeks by sickness. Cincinnati Commercial, 16 February 1861; Speech at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15 February 1861, CW, 4:210-15.

Leaves immediately for depot through streets lined with people. Villard, Eve of '61, 85-87.

Kisses little boy and three lasses while waiting in crowd at depot, part of time in rain. Cincinnati Commercial, 16 February 1861.

Train departs 10 A.M. and retraces journey through Rochester, Pa., to Wellsville, Ohio. Lincoln tells assemblage at Wellsville that he will not speak, because he did so day before. At Salineville and Bayard, Ohio, responds to cheering crowds by saluting and bowing. Cincinnati Commercial, 16 February 1861.

At Alliance, Ohio, he offers remarks that now have become routine: "I appear before you merely to greet you and say farewell. . . . If I should make a speech at every town, I would not get to Washington until some time after the inauguration." Remarks at Alliance, Ohio, 15 February 1861, CW, 4:215.

Accepts hospitality of John N. McCullough, president of railroad, and has dinner at Sourbeck's Hotel. Company of Canton Zouaves stands guard, band plays national airs, and gun salute shatters window during meal, sprinkling glass on Mrs. Lincoln. From temporary stand in front of depot, Lincoln thanks citizens for rousing reception and excuses himself from speaking. Cincinnati Commercial, 16 February 1861.

At Hudson, Ohio, crowd engulfs train. Lincoln steps out on train platform and remarks: "You see by my voice that I am quite hoarse. You will not, therefore, expect a speech from me." Remarks at Hudson, Ohio, 15 February 1861, CW, 4:217-18.

At Ravenna, Ohio, says: "There are doubtless those here who did not vote for me, but I believe we make common cause for the Union." Remarks at Ravenna, Ohio, 15 February 1861, CW, 4:217.

Lincoln, less talkative during day, sits in rear car reading newspapers and reflecting. Cincinnati Commercial, 16 February 1861.

Accepts invitation of Select and Common Councils of Philadelphia to visit city and sets 21st as date. Abraham Lincoln to William P. Hacker and Others, 15 February 1861, CW, 4:216.

Arrives at Cleveland in snow storm. Nicolay to Bates, 17 February 1861, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Detrains two miles from center of city. "Deafening shout from tens of thousands was re-echoed by roar of artillery." Enters open carriage at approximately 4:30 P.M. Escort of military (Cleveland Grays) and fire companies joins procession to Weddell House. Acting Mayor J. N. Masters and Judge Sherlock J. Andrews welcome him. Lincoln replies: "I think that there is no occasion for any excitement. The crisis, as it is called, is altogether an artificial crisis." Cincinnati Commercial, 16 February 1861; Speech at Cleveland, Ohio, 15 February 1861, CW, 4:215-16.

Attends brilliant reception in his honor given in evening. Separate levee held for Mrs. Lincoln. At 10 P.M. Lincoln and suite are guests at supper in Weddell House, where they have lodgings. Cincinnati Commercial, 16 February 1861.

[Another version of temporary loss of First Inaugural Address has it occurring in Cleveland, where it is mislaid by Robert Lincoln. Col. James T. Sterling, "How Lincoln 'Lost' His Inaugural Address," Lincoln Herald 45 (February 1944):23-25.

See also February 11, 1861.] [Irwin withdraws $39.59 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 176.]

Saturday, February 16, 1861.+-

Cleveland, OH and Buffalo, NY.

Militia company of Cleveland Grays escorts Lincoln from hotel to 9 A.M. train. Leland's Brass Band entertains at depot. Villard, Eve of '61, 87.

Train stops at Ohio towns of Willoughby, Painesville, Geneva, Madison, Ashtabula, Conneaut, at Pennsylvania towns of Girard, Erie, Northeast, and at New York towns of Westfield, Dunkirk, and Silver Creek, arriving Buffalo 4:30 P.M. On board are committees from Ohio Legislature, Cleveland, Erie, Chautauqua County, N.Y., and Buffalo. Remarks at Painesville, Ohio, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:218; Remarks at Ashtabula, Ohio, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:218; Remarks at Conneaut, Ohio, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:218-19; Remarks at Erie, Pennsylvania, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:219; Remarks at Westfield, New York, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:219; Remarks at Dunkirk, New York, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:219-20; Cleveland Plain Dealer, 18 February 1861.

At Willoughby Lincoln has time to say good morning and goodbye. At Painesville he speaks from special platform to estimated 3,000 persons in response to introduction by Mayor Wilcox. Remarks at Painesville, Ohio, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:218; Cleveland Plain Dealer, 18 February 1861.

Cong.-elect Albert G. Riddle (Ohio) rides from Cleveland to Painesville and talks to Lincoln about Sen. Cameron (Pa.). Albert G. Riddle, Recollections of War Times: Reminiscences of Men and Events in Washington, 1860-1865 (New York: Putnam, 1895), 179.

Train stops one minute at Geneva and Lincoln replies to introduction by Mr. Bearse. At Madison he compliments crowd of ladies during brief stop. Cleveland Plain Dealer, 18 February 1861.

Crowd calls for Mrs. Lincoln at Ashtabula, and President-elect remarks that "he should hardly hope to induce her to appear, as he had always found it very difficult to make her do what she did not want to." At Conneaut Lincoln thanks "people for the kindly demonstration." Remarks at Ashtabula, Ohio, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:218; Remarks at Conneaut, Ohio, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:218-19.

Horace Greeley boards train at Girard and rides to Erie. Lincoln greets crowd and receives baskets of fruit. Villard, Eve of '61, 87.

At 12:22 P.M. presidential party detrains at Erie, and committee escorts it to dining room of railroad company, where Lincoln makes speech. Cleveland Plain Dealer, 18 February 1861.

At Northeast he delivers brief remarks from rear platform. Henry J. Raymond, The Life and Public Services of Abraham Lincoln . . . Together with his State Papers, including his Speeches, Addresses, Messages, Letters, and Proclamations and the Closing Scenes Connected with his Life and Death (New York: Derby & Miller, 1865), 141.

En route to Washington, D. C., Lincoln's train stops in Westfield, New York, where a "large crowd" greets him. Lincoln remarks that Westfield is the home of twelve-year-old Grace Bedell, who "advised me to let my whiskers grow." Lincoln adds, "[A]cting partly upon her suggestion, I have done so; and now, if she is here, I would like to see her." Before he departs, Lincoln locates the "beautiful girl, with black eyes" and gives her "several hearty kisses . . . amid the yells of delight from the excited crowd." New York Herald, 17 February 1861, 5:1; New York Daily Tribune, 18 February 1861, 5:4; Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), 20 February 1861, 2:1-2; Remarks at Westfield, New York, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:219.

Crowd of 15,000 citizens of Chautauqua County greets Lincoln at Dunkirk. From trackside platform he says: "Standing as I do, with my hand upon this staff, and under the folds of the American flag, I Ask You to Stand by Me so Long as I Stand by It." Cleveland Plain Dealer, 18 February 1861; Remarks at Dunkirk, New York, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:219-20.

Train stops momentarily at Silver Creek, but Lincoln is resting for entrance to Buffalo. Cleveland Plain Dealer, 18 February 1861.

Former President Millard Fillmore and crowd of 10,000 welcome presidential party to Buffalo at 4:30 P.M. Guard of soldiers and police being unable to prevent disorderly jam, guests are jostled and separated; Maj. David Hunter's arm is dislocated, and members of presidential partywalk to hotel. Lincoln rides in procession with Acting Mayor A. S. Benies, Committee Chairman A. M. Clapp, and Ward Hill Lamon, former law partner of Lincoln and bodyguard during trip to Washington. Arriving at American House, speaks from balcony in reply to welcome by acting mayor: "It is most proper I should wait, see the developments, and get all the light I can, so that when I do speak authoritatively I may be as near right as possible. . . . allow me to say that you, as a portion of the great American people, need only to maintain your composure." Meets 34 members of Buffalo committee and governor's staff, who will accompany him to Albany. Holds public reception at 7:30 P.M. Later receives another welcoming committee of 20 Germans headed by ex-Alderman Jacob Beyer. Listens to serenades by two singing groups. Cleveland Plain Dealer, 18 February 1861; Villard, Eve of '61, 87; Speech at Buffalo, New York, 16 February 1861, CW, 4:220-21.

[Irwin withdraws $10.75 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 176.]

Sunday, February 17, 1861.+-

Buffalo, NY.

Former President Fillmore calls for Lincoln at 10 A.M. with carriage and takes him to Unitarian Church to hear Rev. George W. Hosmer. They return to hotel for Mrs. Lincoln, then drive to Fillmore's residence to dine. Back at hotel, Lincoln receives friends during afternoon; takes supper with family; afterwards attends service by Indian preacher, Father John Beason. Villard, Eve of '61, 90; N.Y. Times, 18 February 1861.

Monday, February 18, 1861.+-

Buffalo, NY and Albany, NY.

Several hundred persons and military escort witness Lincoln's departure by train at 5:45 A.M. Horace Greeley again on board. Stops made at New York towns of Batavia, Rochester, Clyde, Syracuse, Utica, Little Falls, Fonda, Amsterdam, and Schenectady. Illinois State Journal, 20 February 1861.

Mr. Bloomer, of Buffalo, "provides the party with dinner, a car being especially fitted up for that purpose." Cleveland Plain Dealer, 18 February 1861.

Gov. Edwin D. Morgan (N.Y.) details five members of staff to accompany Lincoln to Albany. N.Y. Times, 15 February 1861.

Lincoln is traveling in car used few months previously by Prince of Wales. Harper, Press, 85.

At Syracuse Lincoln disappoints crowd of 10,000 by speaking from train instead of from platform in front of Globe Hotel. Villard, Eve of '61, 90-91.

Acknowledges remarks of welcome by mayor of Utica. At Schenectady does not mount special platform in replying to introduction by Judge Platt Potter of Supreme Court. N.Y. Times, 19 February 1861.

Receives enthusiastic welcome upon arrival in Albany at 2:30 P.M. Exchanges short speeches on train platform with Mayor George H. Thatcher before entering open carriage for ride to state Capitol, where he receives, and replies to, welcome by governor and staff. Immediately afterwards addresses joint meeting of legislature: "It is true that while I hold myself without mock modesty, the humblest of all individuals that have ever been elevated to the Presidency, I have a more difficult task to perform than any one of them. . . . I still have confidence that the Almighty, the Maker of the Universe will . . . bring us through this as He has through all the other difficulties of our country." Villard, Eve of '61, 91-92; N.Y. Tribune, 19 February 1861; Address to the Legislature at Albany, New York, 18 February 1861, CW, 4:225-26.

Thurlow Weed interviews Lincoln at Delavan House where presidential party is staying. Rail Splitters, political club, present bouquet. Committee to escort him to New York calls. Lincoln receives committee from Troy, N.Y., and accepts invitation for next day to "spend just as much time with you as the train permits." N.Y. Herald, 19 February 1861; Abraham Lincoln to M. I. Townsend and Committee, 18 February 1861, CW, 4:227.

Lincoln and Morgan families have evening meal at governor's mansion. Lincoln returns to Delavan House for levee at 9 P.M. and greets individually about 1,000 persons; also visits levee held for ladies. N.Y. Herald, 19 February 1861.

Tuesday, February 19, 1861.+-

Albany, NY and New York, NY.

Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln leave Albany at 7:45 A.M. grateful for safe deliverance and resolved never to return. Rivalry between governor and members of legislature for honor of entertaining Lincoln has hampered visit. Villard, Eve of '61, 95-96.

Mayor, civil dignitaries, and Corps of Burgesses escort the Lincolns to depot. N.Y. Times, 20 February 1861.

Lincoln agrees to preinauguration housing arrangement in Washington: "I suppose I am now public property; and a public inn is the place where people can have access to me." Lamon, Recollections, 34-35.

At Troy, N.Y., replies from platform alongside train to welcome by 10,000 people and spokesman, Mayor Isaac McConihe. Remarks at Troy, New York, 19 February 1861, CW, 4:227; Henry J. Raymond, The Life and Public Services of Abraham Lincoln . . . Together with his State Papers, including his Speeches, Addresses, Messages, Letters, and Proclamations and the Closing Scenes Connected with his Life and Death (New York: Derby & Miller, 1865), 145.

Speaks a New York towns of Rhinebeck, Hudson, Poughkeepsie, Fishkill, and Peekskill [which boasts of the oldest Lincoln Society in America]. Arriving 30th Street Station in New York 3 P.M. has hair smoothed and receives kiss from Mrs. Lincoln before leaving car. N.Y. Times, 20 February 1861; Monaghan, Diplomat, 30.

Presidential party occupies 11 carriages in procession to Astor House. Estimated 250,000 people watch; "crowd not as large as usual" on such an occasion. Lincoln rides in open carriage with Chairman Charles G. Cornell, city alderman, Col. Edwin V. Sumner, military aide in Lincoln party, and Judge David Davis, old Illinois friend and member of presidential party, and waves to crowd. No band or military company in procession. Baltimore Sun, 20 February 1861, 21 February 1861.

Acknowledges welcome of crowd at Astor House with few remarks at 4 P.M. Addresses crowd later: "I have kept silence for the reason that I supposed it was peculiarly proper that I should do so until the time came when, according to the customs of the country, I should speak officially." Dines with family. Baltimore Sun, 21 February 1861; Remarks upon Arriving at the Astor House, New York City, 19 February 1861, CW, 4:229-30; Speech at the Astor House, New York City, 19 February 1861, CW, 4:230-31.

Receives Republican electors of city headed by William Cullen Bryant, editor, New York Evening Post, about 8 P.M. at hotel, followed by Kings County, N.Y., delegation and several Republican clubs. N.Y. World, 20 February 1861.

Wives of politicians hold reception for Mrs. Lincoln. Monaghan, Diplomat, 31.

Lincoln thanks Brooklyn Common Council for invitation, but engagements will not permit visit. Promises people of Newark, N.J., that he will bow from train. Reply to the Brooklyn Common Council Committee, New York City, 19 February 1861, CW, 4:232; Abraham Lincoln to the People of Newark, New Jersey, 19 February 1861, CW, 4:231.

Wednesday, February 20, 1861.+-

New York, NY.

Accompanied by Thurlow Weed, N. B. Judd, James W. Webb, editor, "Morning Courier and New York Enquirer," and Gov. William Sprague (R.I.), Lincoln leaves Astor House at 8:30 A.M. to breakfast with selected group of merchants at home of former Cong. Moses H. Grinnell (N.Y.), New York merchant. N.Y. World, 21 February 1861; N.Y. Times, 21 February 1861; N.Y. Herald, 21 February 1861.

Returns to hotel at 10:30 A.M. and meets Joshua Dewey, aged 94, who has voted at every presidential election since George Washington's. N.Y. Times, 21 February 1861.

Committee from common council headed by Alderman Cornell escorts Lincoln to City Hall at 11 A.M. to meet Mayor Fernando Wood and council. Replying to Wood's speech, Lincoln says: "There is nothing that can ever bring me willingly to consent to the destruction of this Union, under which . . . the whole country has acquired its greatness, unless it were to be that thing for which the Union itself was made." N.Y. Times, 21 February 1861; Reply to Mayor Fernando Wood at New York City, 20 February 1861, CW, 4:232-33.

Remains for public reception; "motley crowd poured in"; shakes hands with 30 veterans of War of 1812; makes brief remarks from balcony of City Hall; and returns to hotel shortly after 1 P.M. N.Y. Times, 21 February 1861; Cleveland Plain Dealer, 20 February 1861; N.Y. Herald, 21 February 1861.

In afternoon receives number of friends privately. N.Y. Times, 21 February 1861.

Showman P. T. Barnum invites him to museum, but he does not go; Mrs. Lincoln and children accept. Meets former Gov. Hamilton Fish (N.Y.). Receives hats from both Knox and Leary, New York hatters; when asked their relative value, comments, "They mutually surpassed each other." N.Y. World, 21 February 1861.

Vice President-elect Hamlin arrives in New York and dines with Lincoln family in its hotel rooms. Baltimore Sun, 22 February 1861.

Lincoln, Judge Davis, and Alderman Cornell arrive late at Academy of Music for performance of Verdi's new opera "Un Ballo in Maschera." N.Y. World, 21 February 1861; N.Y. Times, 21 February 1861.

Lincoln wears black gloves and shocks city's é lite. Monaghan, Diplomat, 31.

After first act takes two bows in response to applause. Audience and cast sing "The Star Spangled Banner." Lincoln returns to hotel after second act. N.Y. World, 21 February 1861.

Hamlin speaks from window of ladies' parlor. Presidential party serenaded by German quartette from Hoboken and by National Guard band. N.Y. Times, 21 February 1861.

[Irwin withdraws $7 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 176.]

Mrs. Lincoln holds reception at Astor House 8:30 to 10 P.M. N.Y. Times, 21 February 1861.

Thursday, February 21, 1861.+-

New York, NY and En route to Philadelphia, PA.

Lincoln departs from New York via Cortlandt Street ferry at 8 A.M. escorted by cheering crowd and salvos of artillery. Philadelphia Inquirer, 22 February 1861; Baltimore Sun, 22 February 1861.

At Jersey City, N.J., replies briefly to welcome by William L. Dayton, attorney general of New Jersey. To quiet the crowd, speaks a second time. Remarks at Jersey City, New Jersey, 21 February 1861, CW, 4:233-34; Remarks at Newark, New Jersey, 21 February 1861, CW, 4:234-35.

At Newark, N.J., Lincoln detrains at "lower depot" and rides one and a half miles in open carriage through town to "upper depot." At each depot is introduced and makes short speech. One estimate reports crowd at 75,000, lower estimate is 25,000. Mount Holly New-Jersey Mirror and Burlington County Advertiser, 28 February 1861; Remarks at Newark, New Jersey, 21 February 1861, CW, 4:234-35.

Replies from rear platform to introduction by J. J. Chetwood at Elizabeth, N.J. Rahway, N.J., crowd of 3,000 sees Lincoln for moment. N.Y. World, 22 February 1861.

Judge John Van Dyke introduces him from train to 5,000 spectators at New Brunswick, N.J.; Lincoln replies. Remarks at New Brunswick, New Jersey, 21 February 1861, CW, 4:235; Philadelphia Inquirer, 28 February 1861.

Thirty-four-gun national salute at 12 M. signifies arrival of presidential party at Trenton, N.J. Mayor Mills welcomes Lincoln, who replies and joins W. L. Dayton in open carriage for trip to capitol. Baltimore Sun, 23 February 1861.

En route to Washington, D. C., Lincoln stops in Trenton, New Jersey, where he addresses the state senate. He remarks, "You give me this reception . . . without distinction of party. . . . [T]his body is composed of a majority of gentlemen who, in the exercise of their best judgment in the choice of a Chief Magistrate, did not think I was the man. . . . [N]evertheless . . . they came forward here to greet me as the constitutional President of the United States . . . the representative man of the nation, united by a purpose to perpetuate the Union and liberties of the people." New York Daily Tribune, 22 February 1861, 5:5; Address to the New Jersey Senate at Trenton, New Jersey, 21 February 1861, CW, 4:235-36.

To General Assembly he says: "I shall do all that may be in my power to promote a peaceful settlement of our difficulties. The man does not live who is more devoted to peace than I am. None who would do more to preserve it. But it may be necessary to put the foot down firmly." Address to the New Jersey General Assembly at Trenton, New Jersey, 21 February 1861, CW, 4:236-37.

Goes to Trenton House for lunch; by popular demand makes few remarks from balcony. Baltimore Sun, 23 February 1861; Remarks at Trenton House, Trenton, New Jersey, 21 February 1861, CW, 4:237-38.

Leaves Trenton shortly after 2 P.M. Speaks briefly from train at Bristol, Pa. Trenton Daily State Gazette and Republican, 23 February 1861.

Arrives Kensington depot Philadelphia at 4 P.M. Receives 34-gun salute by Minute Men of '76 and rides in carriage to Continental Hotel while 100,000 persons watch. Baltimore Sun, 22 February 1861, 23 February 1861.

Speaks from balcony of hotel in reply to welcome by Mayor Alexander Henry. "We are confident that not one person in the crowd below heard one word of Lincoln's speech." Baltimore Sun, 22 February 1861; Reply to Mayor Alexander Henry at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 21 February 1861, CW, 4:238-39.

Retires from balcony to dine with Mrs. Lincoln in adjoining room. Baltimore Sun, 23 February 1861.

Stands in receiving line for public reception beginning 8:30 P.M. Replies to delegates who invite him to Wilmington, Del.: "I feel highly flattered . . . but circumstances forbid." Baltimore Sun, 23 February 1861; Reply to a Delegation from Wilmington, Delaware, 21 February 1861, CW, 4:239-40.

Toward end of reception N. B. Judd asks Lincoln to meet with him and Frederick W. Seward who has just arrived from Washington with letter to Lincoln from his father, Sen. Seward (N.Y.). Letter, based upon information obtained by Gen. Scott and Capt. Charles P. Stone (USA, resd.) describes plot to assassinate Lincoln while passing through Baltimore. Detectives employed by railroad also report similar plot. Lincoln thanks Seward for bringing letter and comments that he will consider the advice to change time and schedule. Refuses to change plans until commitments in Philadelphia and Harrisburg, Pa., are completed. Frederick W. Seward, Reminiscences of a War-Time Statesman and Diplomat, 1830-1915. By Frederick W. Seward, Assistant Secretary of State during the Administrations of Lincoln, Johnson, and Hayes (New York: Putnam, 1916), 134-38; William H. Seward Jr., "Reminiscences of Lincoln," Magazine of History 9 (February 1909):107.

City's celebration of Lincoln's visit continues with band concert and fireworks. Philadelphia Inquirer, 22 February 1861.

Lincoln meets delegation representing Pennsylvania state administration in chambers of Judge James Milliken in Philadelphia and learns that opposition to Sen. Cameron's (Pa.) appointment has been withdrawn. Milliken to Cameron, 22 February 1861, Simon Cameron Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

[Irwin withdraws $72.24 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 176.]

Mrs. Lincoln objects to living in private home while waiting to occupy White House. Plans are changed. Lamon to Washburne, 21 February 1861, Elihu B. Washburne Papers, Library of Congress, Washington DC.

Friday, February 22, 1861.+-

Philadelphia, PA and Harrisburg, PA.

XML error in Log entry

Saturday, February 23, 1861.+-

Baltimore, MD and Washington, DC.

Philadelphia-to-Washington train, with Lincoln, W. H. Lamon, and detective Allan Pinkerton on board, switches to Baltimore & Ohio tracks about 4 A.M. at Baltimore and arrives Washington 6 A.M. Baltimore Sun, 25 February 1861; Ida M. Tarbell, The Life of Abraham Lincoln, Sangamon ed., 4 vols. (New York: Lincoln History Society, 1924), 3:42.

Cong. Washburne (Ill.) surprises Lincoln by meeting train with carriage and driving him to Willard's Hotel, 14th St. and Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Francis F. Browne, The Everyday Life of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Thompson, 1886), 391-92.

Lincoln breakfasts with Sen. Seward (N.Y.), after which they call upon President Buchanan at White House and meet members of cabinet. Calls on Gen. Scott, who is not home. Returns to Willard's. National Intelligencer, 25 February 1861; N.Y. World, 27 February 1861.

Telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in Harrisburg, Pa., of safe arrival Washington 6 A.M. N.Y. World, 25 February 1861.

At 2 P.M. Scott returns Lincoln's call. Illinois State Journal, 27 February 1861.

Visitors include Montgomery Blair [soon to be postmaster general] and father, Francis P. Blair, Sr., Washington newspaperman and political figure. Allen C. Clark, Abraham Lincoln in the National Capital (Washington, DC: W. F. Roberts Co., 1925), 9.

[About this date Lincoln visits Mathew B. Brady, 352 Pennsylvania Ave. and poses for several photographs. Frederick H. Meserve and Carl Sandburg, The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1944), 23 February 1861.]

Receives Illinois delegation headed by Sen. Stephen A. Douglas (Ill.) in late afternoon. Illinois State Journal, 27 February 1861.

Goes by carriage to Seward's residence at 7 P.M. to dine privately. Baltimore Sun, 25 February 1861; Clarence E. Macartney, Lincoln and His Cabinet (New York: Scribner, 1931), 123-24.

On return from dinner finds long hall at Willard's lined with people and is so interested in greeting friends on either hand that he forgets to remove hat. N.Y. World, 25 February 1861.

Delegates to Peace Conference meeting in Washington call upon Lincoln at 9 P.M. Sen.-elect Chase (Ohio) [soon to be secretary of treasury] and Lucius E. Chittenden, delegate from Vermont, introduce them. Illinois State Journal, 27 February 1861; Lucius E. Chittenden, Recollections of President Lincoln and his Administration (New York: Harper, 1891), 68-78.

Lincoln holds impromptu public reception for members of Congress and persons of distinction crowding parlor and anterooms. Baltimore Sun, 25 February 1861.

Buchanan's cabinet calls at 10 P.M. Allen C. Clark, Abraham Lincoln in the National Capital (Washington, DC: W. F. Roberts Co., 1925), 9.

Group of New York businessmen presents compromise scheme to restore Southern commerce. William E. Baringer, A House Dividing: Lincoln as President Elect (Springfield, IL: Abraham Lincoln Association, 1945), 307.

[Irwin withdraws $50 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 176.

Mrs. Lincoln leaves Harrisburg at 9 A.M. on Presidential train, dines at home of John S. Gittings, Baltimore financier and director of B. & O., arrives Washington about 4 P.M., and rides to hotel with Seward and Washburne. N.Y. Herald, 23 February 1861; Baltimore Sun, 25 February 1861; National Intelligencer, 26 February 1861.

"Hon. A. Lincoln & Family 5 persons Meals in Room for 6" is assigned at Willard's to "No. 6." Private dinners, entertaining, liquor and cigars for numerous visitors bring bill to total of $773.75. (See April 19, 1861.) DLC—Willard's Register Ms.

Sunday, February 24, 1861.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln family breakfasts at hotel. Barton, Life of Lincoln, 2:5.

Lincoln attends St. John's Episcopal Church, opposite Executive Mansion, with Sen. Seward (N.Y.) and after service spends two hours at Seward's home. Washington National Republican, 25 February 1861.

In afternoon reads newspaper comments on recent speeches. Barton, Life of Lincoln, 2:6.

Receives many callers including Sen. John J. Crittenden (Ky.) and Cong. Charles Francis Adams (Mass.). Illinois State Journal, 27 February 1861; Barton, Life of Lincoln, 2:6.

In evening Vice President John C. Breckinridge calls. Baltimore Sun, 25 February 1861.

Lincoln speaks briefly from hotel window to crowd attending serenade by Marine Band. Stanley P. Kimmel, Mr. Lincoln's Washington (New York: Coward-McCann, 1957), 16.

Seward returns copy of Inaugural Address with written comments. Barton, Life of Lincoln, 2:5.

Monday, February 25, 1861.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln, escorted by Sen. Seward (N.Y.), attends informal reception in both houses of Congress and visits justices of Supreme Court during afternoon. National Intelligencer, 26 February 1861; Albert Shaw, Abraham Lincoln, His Path to the Presidency: The Year of his Election,, 2 vols. (New York: Review of Reviews, 1930), 2:261.

In evening Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln receive visitors for two hours in hotel parlors. Baltimore Sun, 26 February 1861.

[Irwin withdraws $5.50 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 176.]

Tuesday, February 26, 1861.+-

Washington, DC.

Accompanied by son Robert and John G. Nicolay, private secretary to President-elect, Lincoln takes long walk shortly after sunrise. Interviews two committees representing former Gov. Nathaniel P. Banks (Mass.) and urging his appointment as secretary of war. Sen.-elect Ira Harris (N.Y.) calls on Lincoln in afternoon. Lincoln receives memorials from New York and Boston publishers requesting appointment of Cong. Schuyler Colfax (Ind.) as postmaster general. N.Y. Times, 27 February 1861.

Visits Senate to confer with Republican leaders. N.Y. Tribune, 27 February 1861.

Holds interview for several hours with Gov. Thomas H. Hicks (Md.), Sen. Douglas (Ill.), and others who recommend that he interpose his influence for settlement of pending difficulties. Baltimore Sun, 28 February 1861.

Replies to Sen. Trumbull (Ill.), and Congs. Washburne (Ill.) and Anson Burlingame (Mass.), committee of Congress reporting electoral count. Reply to Committee of Congress Reporting the Electoral Count, 26 February 1861, CW, 4:246.

[Irwin withdraws $98.68 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 176.]

Mrs. Lincoln receives friends from 3 to 4 P.M. and from 8 to 10 P.M. Washington National Republican, 27 February 1861.

Wednesday, February 27, 1861.+-

Washington, DC.

Lincoln walks two miles and holds long interview with former Sen. John Bell (Tenn.) before breakfast. N.Y. Times, 28 February 1861.

Washington, D. C. Mayor James G. Berret extends an official welcome to President-elect Lincoln, who resides at the Willard's Hotel. Mayor Berret expresses hope that Lincoln will "restore peace and harmony to our now distracted country." Lincoln acknowledges the "ill feeling that has existed and still exists between the people of the section from whence I came and the people here." He declares, "I have not now any purpose to withhold from you any of the benefits of the constitution . . . that I would not feel myself constrained to withhold from my own neighbors." New York Herald, 28 February 1861, 1:3; Reply to Mayor James G. Berret at Washington, DC, 27 February 1861, CW, 4:246-47.

Receives clerks of executive departments. Talks with Sen. Douglas (Ill.) who stays late to make impassioned plea for conciliation of South. National Intelligencer, 1 March 1861; Fletcher Pratt, History of the Civil War (New York: Pocket Books, 1956), 4.

Goes to Capitol and receives justices of Supreme Court in afternoon. N.Y. Times, 28 February 1861.

At 9 P.M. group of border statesmen, including former Sec. of Treasury James Guthrie of Kentucky and Alexander W. Doniphan of Missouri, calls to talk compromise. William E. Baringer, A House Dividing: Lincoln as President Elect (Springfield, IL: Abraham Lincoln Association, 1945), 315.

Thursday, February 28, 1861.+-

Washington, DC.

Sen. Crittenden (Ky.) calls to talk compromise. Several New York delegations see Lincoln about cabinet appointments and other matters. William E. Baringer, A House Dividing: Lincoln as President Elect (Springfield, IL: Abraham Lincoln Association, 1945), 319.

Cong. Elbridge G. Spaulding (N.Y.), capitalist, gives private dinner at National Hotel in honor of Lincoln and Vice President-elect Hamlin; Gen. Scott present, also some Republican leaders depressed by prospect of losing Southern business. Evening enlivened by Lincoln remarking, apropos news item about Georgian oath to wear no clothes produced under Republican regime, that he would like to see some Georgia gentlemen clad in the costume produced in their state—a shirt collar and a pair of spurs. Fletcher Pratt, History of the Civil War (New York: Pocket Books, 1956), 4-5; National Intelligencer, 2 March 1861.

Lincoln and Hamlin make speeches responding to serenade by Republican Association. Baltimore Sun, 2 March 1861; Response to a Serenade, 28 February 1861, CW, 4:247-48.

George S. Boutwell, former governor of Massachusetts, and Gen. Wool hold long interviews with Lincoln. N.Y. Times, 1 March 1861.