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Thursday, February 14, 1861.+-

Columbus, OH and Pittsburgh, PA.

Lincoln and family leave governor's mansion at 7 A.M. under escort for depot. Cincinnati Commercial, 15 February 1861.

Train departs shortly before 8 A.M. with throngs of people standing under umbrellas waving farewells. Villard, Eve of '61, 83; Columbus Ohio Statesman, 14 February 1861.

Lincoln travels most of way to Pittsburgh in rain, but makes number of stops for speeches where crowds are waiting. William E. Baringer, A House Dividing: Lincoln as President Elect (Springfield, IL: Abraham Lincoln Association, 1945), 276.

Responds to welcome at Ohio towns of Newark, Frazeysburg, Dresden, Coshocton, Newcomerstown, Uhrichsville, Cadiz Junction, Steubenville, Wellsville, and at Pennsylvania towns of Rochester, Allegheny City, and Pittsburgh. Remarks at Newark, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:206; Remarks at Cadiz Junction, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:206; Speech at Steubenville, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:206-7; Remarks at Wellsville, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:207-8; Remarks at Rochester, Pennsylvania, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:208; Remarks at the Monongahela House, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:208-9; Remarks from Balcony of the Monongahela House, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:209-10; Cincinnati Commercial, 15 February 1861.

At Cadiz Junction Lincoln dines at Parks House; later remarks to crowd from platform of car that he is "too full for utterance." Remarks at Cadiz Junction, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:206; Columbus Capital City Fact, 15 February 1861.

Receives welcome from Judge Lloyd and approximately 10,000 people gathered around carpeted stage near railroad tracks in Steubenville. Replies: "We everywhere express devotion to the Constitution. I believe there is no difference in this respect, whether on this or on the other side of this majestic stream. . . . The question is, as to what the Constitution means— . . . To decide that, who shall be the judge? Can you think of any other, than the voice of the people?" Speech at Steubenville, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:206-7; Cincinnati Commercial, 15 February 1861.

Leaves Steubenville at 2:30 P.M. and shortly arrives at Wellsville where he makes brief remarks from platform of rear car. Escort committees from Allegheny City and Cleveland are on board. At Rochester Lincoln answers question, "What will you do with the secesssionists then?" by saying, "My friend, that is a matter which I have under very grave consideration." Remarks at Wellsville, Ohio, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:207-8; Remarks at Rochester, Pennsylvania, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:208; Cincinnati Commercial, 15 February 1861.

Arrives at Allegheny City at 8 P.M., having been delayed two hours by broken-down freight train near Freedom, Ohio. Acknowledges welcome of mayor in rain and enters carriage for Monongahela House in Pittsburgh across river. ["We finally got Mr. Lincoln into a carriage; but . . . it looked for a while as if we would never get the carriage out of the crowd that was pushing and yelling all around us." Nicolay to Bates, 15 February 1861, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.]

Large crowds in rain and mud block streets to hotel and pack lobby. Standing on chair in lobby of Monongahela House Lincoln reflects: "I could not help thinking, my friends, as I traveled in the rain through your crowded streets, on my way here, that if all that people were in favor of the Union, it can certainly be in no great danger—it will be preserved. . . . Well, my friends, as it is not much I have to say, and as there may be some uncertainty of another opportunity, I will utter it now, if you will permit me to procure a few notes." Returns and announces he has been persuaded to finish speech in morning. Baltimore Sun, 15 February 1861; Remarks at the Monongahela House, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvnia, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:208-9; Remarks from Balcony of the Monongahela House, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 14 February 1861, CW, 4:209-10.