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15 entries found


Browse Month

President spends most of day waiting for reports, sending and receiving messages. Returns to "River Queen" in evening and walks deck most of night. William H. Crook, "Lincoln's Last Day: New Facts Now Told for the First Time. Compiled and written down by Margarita S. Gerry," Harper's Monthly Magazine 115 (September 1907):519; Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 1 April 1865, CW, 8:379; Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 1 April 1865, CW, 8:379-80; Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 1 April 1865, CW, 8:380-81; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 1 April 1865, CW, 8:381; Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 392-93.

Mrs. Lincoln and Sec. Seward return to Washington. Tad remains with father. LL, No. 1408; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 1 April 1865, CW, 8:381.



Browse Month

President remains at front. Mrs. Lincoln arrives in Washington on steamer "Monohasset." Washington Star, 3 April 1865; Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI pt. 3, 446.

Lincoln goes ashore in barge ordered by Rear Adm. Porter. Francis F. Browne, The Everyday Life of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Thompson, 1886), 689.

Rides out to entrenchments near battleground and watches fighting for short while. William H. Crook, "Lincoln's Last Day: New Facts Now Told for the First Time. Compiled and written down by Margarita S. Gerry," Harper's Monthly Magazine 115 (September 1907):519; Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 461.

Sends message 7:45 A.M. to Mrs. Lincoln: "This morning Gen. Grant, . . . telegraphs as follows. . . . 'The battle now rages furiously. . . . All now looks highly favorable.'" Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 2 April 1865, CW, 8:381-82.

In afternoon telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln: "Gen. Grant telegraphs that he has Petersburg completely enveloped . . . suggests that I shall go out and see him . . . which I think I will do. Tad and I are both well." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 2 April 1865, CW, 8:384; Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 447-48.

At 11 A.M. telegraphs Sec. Stanton : "Despatches frequently coming in. All going finely." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 2 April 1865, CW, 8:382.

At 2 P.M. sends Grant's report to Stanton: "'We are now closing around the works of the line immediately enveloping Petersburg. All looks remarkably well.'" Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 2 April 1865, CW, 8:382-83.

At 8:15 P.M. telegraphs Grant: "Allow me to tender to you, and all with you, the nations grateful thanks for this additional, and magnificent success. At your kind suggestion, I think I will visit you to-morrow." Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 2 April 1865, CW, 8:383.



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Revised Entry

At 8 A.M. President starts for meeting with Gen. Grant in Petersburg, Va., now evacuated. Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 508; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 3 April 1865, CW, 8:384-85.

Receives message from Grant suggesting that he come to headquarters. Train is made up and takes Presidential party to Patrick Station, about mile from town. President and Tad proceed in ambulance. Barnes, "With Lincoln," 744.

Lincoln on special train receives message at Pitkin Station from Robert: "I am awaiting you at Hancock Station." Lincoln to Lincoln, 3 April 1865, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln and Grant talk for hour and half in small house in Petersburg. Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs, 2 vols. (London: Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, 1886), 2:452-59; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 3 April 1865, CW, 8:385.

President returns to train and to U.S.S. "Malvern," flagship of Rear Adm. Porter, in high spirits. Receives message from Gen. Weitzel in evening that Richmond is being evacuated. Barnes, "With Lincoln," 745-46.

[Weitzel takes possession of Richmond at 8:15 A.M. Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 510.]

At 5 P. M., from City Point, Virginia, located near the front lines and General Ulysses S. Grant's headquarters, Lincoln writes to his wife, Mary. The Lincoln's youngest son Tad accompanies his father. Lincoln reports on the war's progress and on a visit with their oldest son Robert. Lincoln writes, "Petersburg & Richmond are both in our hands; and Tad & I have been to the former & been with Bob four or five hours. He is well & in good spirits. Come down as you proposed." CW, 10:285.

At 5 P.M. President telegraphs Sec. Stanton from City Point: "Yours received. Thanks for you caution; but I have already been to Petersburg, staid with Gen. Grant an hour & a half and returned here. It is certain now that Richmond is in our hands, and I think I will go there to-morrow. I will take care of myself." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 3 April 1865, CW, 8:385.



Browse Month

At 8 A.M. President orders Samuel A. Beckwith, cipher operator at Gen. Grant's headquarters, to accompany him to Richmond. Bates, Telegraph Office, 353-54.

Presidential party travels on "River Queen" to meet Rear Adm. Porter's fleet. Transfers to flagship U.S.S. "Malvern" for trip to Richmond. Abandons "Malvern" for Captain's gig manned by 12 sailors. With President are Porter, Capt. Penrose, Tad, and W. H. Crook. Party lands at point called Rocketts on edge of town, 100 or more yards back of Libby Prison. With six sailors in front of President and six in rear, with Porter and Penrose on one side and Tad and Crook on other, party proceeds on foot to Gen. Weitzel's headquarters, house recently occupied by President Davis. William H. Crook, "Lincoln's Last Day: New Facts Now Told for the First Time. Compiled and written down by Margarita S. Gerry," Harper's Monthly Magazine 115 (September 1907):520-22.

At Davis house is shown into room used for office. Sits and remarks, "This must have been President Davis's chair." Inspects house accompanied by aide to Gen. Weitzel. Thomas Thatcher Graves, in Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Being for the Most Part Contributions by Union and Confederate Officers, 4 vols. (1884-1887; reprint, with a new introduction by Roy F. Nichols, New York: T. Yoseloff, 1956), 4:728.

Lunches with Gens. Weitzel and Shepley; rides around in ambulance through crowded streets to various points of interest, stopping only at Capitol, before returning to "Malvern" for night. Among visitors to see President is Duff Green, diplomat and journalist. William H. Crook, "Lincoln's Last Day: New Facts Now Told for the First Time. Compiled and written down by Margarita S. Gerry," Harper's Monthly Magazine 115 (September 1907):520-22; Barnes, "With Lincoln," 746-49; Washington Star, 8 April 1865.

Interviews former Assoc. Justice Campbell on subject of peace. Washington Chronicle, 9 April 1865; Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 723.

Lincoln's reception at Richmond is described by Weitzel as "enthusiastic in the extreme." Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 574-75.



Browse Month

At 9 A.M. President comes ashore in Rear Adm. Porter's barge and goes to army headquarters. Bates, Telegraph Office, 357.

Again meets former Assoc. Justice Campbell, to discuss how Virginia can be brought back into Union. Campbell to Anderson, 7 April 1865, Edwin M. Stanton Papers, Library of Congress, Washington DC; Abraham Lincoln to John A. Campbell, [5 April 1865], CW, 8:386-87.

After morning meeting with Campbell, President leaves Richmond for City Point. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 5 April 1865, CW, 8:387; Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 575.

President replies to Seward: "Yours of to-day received. I think there is no probability of my remaining here more than two days longer. If that is too long come down. I passed last night at Richmond and have just returned." Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 5 April 1865, CW, 8:387.

At 6 P.M. receives message that Sec. Seward has been thrown from carriage and dangerously injured. Stanton to Lincoln, 5 April 1865, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

[Receives March salary warrant for $1,981.67. Pratt, Personal Finances, 184.

Mrs. Lincoln, accompanied by Sen. Sumner (Mass.), Sen. Harlan (Iowa) and family, Mrs. Elizabeth Keckley, and Marquis de Chambrun, leaves Washington at 11 A.M. aboard steamer "Monohasset" for City Point. Washington Star, 5 April 1865; Elizabeth Keckley, Behind the Scenes: Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (1868: reprint, Buffalo, NY: Stansil and Lee, 1931), 162-64.]



Browse Month

President authorizes Gen. Weitzel to give permission to "gentlemen who have acted as the Legislature of Virginia, in support of the rebellion" to assemble at Richmond and take measures to withdraw Virginia troops. Abraham Lincoln to Godfrey Weitzel, 6 April 1865, CW, 8:389.

In Col. Theodore S. Bowers' tent quotes Artemus Ward's account of escape of "Polly Ann." Bates, Telegraph Office, 187.

Mrs. Lincoln and party join President on board steamer "River Queen." Adolphe de Pineton, marquis de Chambrun, Impressions of Lincoln and the Civil War: A Foreigner's Account (New York: Random House, 1952), 73-77.

President informs Gen. Grant of Sec. Seward's accident and of conferences with former Assoc. Justice J. A. Campbell in Richmond. If war is further persisted in South, confiscated property will bear additional cost. Confiscations will be remitted to people of any state which promptly withdraws its troops from resistance to government. If Confederate Legislature of Virginia wishes to meet for this purpose, Weitzel will protect them. "I do not think it very probable that anything will come of this; but I have thought best to notify you." Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 6 April 1865, CW, 8:388-89.

President visits military offices, anxious for news from Grant. Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 595.



Browse Month

President forwards to Sec. Stanton telegrams from Gens. Humphreys, Meade, and Wright. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 7 April 1865, CW, 8:390-92.

Interviews Asst. Sec. Dana and remarks that "Sheridan seemed to be getting Virginia soldiers out of the war faster than this legislature could think." Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 619.

Reviews troops and tires himself out shaking hands. Elizabeth Keckley, Behind the Scenes: Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (1868: reprint, Buffalo, NY: Stansil and Lee, 1931), 168.

Congs. James G. Blaine (Maine) and Washburne (Ill.), on trip to front, visit President on board steamer "River Queen" in evening. Rice, 43-44.

Lincoln telegraphs Gen. Grant: "Gen. Sheridan says 'If the thing is pressed I think Lee will surrender.' Let the thing be pressed." Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 7 April 1865, CW, 8:392.



Browse Month

President meets Cong. Washburne (Ill.) on shore in morning and hands him letter for Robert at front. Rice, 44.

Marquis de Chambrun and Sen. Sumner (Mass.) go aboard "River Queen," and President shows them seating arrangement of Hampton Roads Conference. Rufus R. Wilson, ed., Intimate Memories of Lincoln (Elmira, NY: Primavera Press, 1942), 581.

Presidential party, including Mrs. Lincoln and friends, goes by special train to Petersburg. Rufus R. Wilson, ed., Intimate Memories of Lincoln (Elmira, NY: Primavera Press, 1942), 581.

President inspects hospital camps and confers with generals at headquarters on far side of town. On drive back to railroad station, stops to have everyone admire tree he remembers from previous visit. Adolphe de Pineton, marquis de Chambrun, Impressions of Lincoln and the Civil War: A Foreigner's Account (New York: Random House, 1952), 78-83.

In evening military band gives farewell concert on board "River Queen." President requests two numbers: "Marseillaise" and "Dixie." Adolphe de Pineton, marquis de Chambrun, Impressions of Lincoln and the Civil War: A Foreigner's Account (New York: Random House, 1952), 78-83.

At 11 P.M. Presidential party leaves City Point, for return trip to Washington. National Intelligencer, 10 April 1865.



Browse Month

"That whole day [steaming up Potomac] the conversation turned on literary subjects. Mr. Lincoln read aloud to us for several hours. Most of the passages he selected were from Shakespeare." Adolphe de Pineton, marquis de Chambrun, Impressions of Lincoln and the Civil War: A Foreigner's Account (New York: Random House, 1952), 82-86.

President returns in excellent health. "River Queen" arrives at 6 P.M., bringing President, Mrs. Lincoln, Tad, Atty. Gen. Speed, Asst. Sec. Otto, Sen. Sumner (Mass.), Sen. Harlan (Iowa), Mrs. Harlan and daughter Mary, and Marquis de Chambrun. Washington Star, 10 April 1865.

Presidential party arrives about sundown. Streets alive with people. Bonfires everywhere. Gen. R. E. Lee has surrendered. William H. Crook, "Lincoln's Last Day: New Facts Now Told for the First Time. Compiled and written down by Margarita S. Gerry," Harper's Monthly Magazine 115 (September 1907):523.

President visits Sec. Seward, severely injured by fall from carriage. Francis F. Browne, The Everyday Life of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Thompson, 1886), 694-95.

Crowds in front of White House call for President. "He responded briefly but pleasantly." Francis F. Browne, The Everyday Life of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Thompson, 1886), 697.



Browse Month

Noah Brooks breakfasts at White House with Lincoln. "Castine" [Noah Brooks], Washington, April 12, 1865, in Sacramento Union, 8 May 1865.

President visits Navy Yard in morning and makes brief speech. Washington Star, 10 April 1865.

Interviews O. H. Browning on topics of the day. Browning, Diary.

Crowds serenade President throughout day. He makes extemporaneous speeches. LL, No. 1408; Response to Serenade, 10 April 1865, CW, 8:393-94; Response to Serenade, 10 April 1865, CW, 8:394-95.

Cabinet meets. Randall, Lincoln, 4:348.

President has photos made by A. Gardner. Frederick H. Meserve and Carl Sandburg, The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1944), 10 April 1865.

At 5 P.M. large crowd with bands assembles at White House. President responds to serenade and promises to prepare speech for tomorrow. Washington Star, 11 April 1865.

About 6 P.M. delegation of 15 men enters White House and meets President in hall. Spokesman for group makes speech and presents Lincoln with picture of himself in silver frame. William H. Crook, "Lincoln's Last Day: New Facts Now Told for the First Time. Compiled and written down by Margarita S. Gerry," Harper's Monthly Magazine 115 (September 1907):523.

Lincoln writes note to Sec. Stanton : "Tad wants some flags. Can he be accommodated." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 10 April 1865, CW, 8:395.

Writes note to Sec. Welles: "Let Master Tad have a Navy sword." Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, [10 April 1865?], CW, 8:395.



Browse Month

President consults with Gen. Butler on freed Negro problem. Butler, Correspondence, 5:589; CW, 8:588.

Marshal Lamon and Sec. Usher call on President, who sends Lamon to Richmond on business connected with reconstruction convention. Lamon, Recollections, 279-81.

Cabinet meets. Cotton question chief topic. Welles, Diary.

President issues proclamation closing certain ports of entry and proclamation concerning foreign port privileges. Proclamation Concerning Blockade, 11 April 1865, CW, 8:396-97; Proclamation Modifying Bloackade of Key West, Florida, 11 April 1865, CW, 8:397; Proclamation Concerning Foreign Port Privileges, 11 April 1865, CW, 8:397-98.

Makes public address from upper window to crowd on White House lawn. Washington Star, 11 April 1865.

Grand celebration. President appears at one window and Mrs. Lincoln at another. Reads speech. Washington Star, 12 April 1865.

In this, his last public speech, President discusses status of Confederate States and his plan for restoring them to their place in Union. Albert G. Riddle, Recollections of War Times: Reminiscences of Men and Events in Washington, 1860-1865 (New York: Putnam, 1895), 329; Last Public Address, 11 April 1865, CW, 8:399-405.

Writes pass: "Allow the bearer, W. H. Lamon &friend, with ordinary baggage to pass from Washington to Richmond and return." Pass for Ward H. Lamon, 11 April 1865, CW, 8:395.

Mrs. Lincoln writes Gen. Grant that President is ill but "would be very much pleased to see you this . . . evening . . . &I want you to drive . . . with us to see the illumination." CW, 8:588.



Browse Month

After breakfast O. H. Browning introduces to President William C. Bibb, influential Unionist of Montgomery, Ala., interested in reconstruction, and receives various passes and orders. Browning, Diary.

Col. William P. Kellogg (resd.), former chief justice of Nebraska Territory, and Sen. Harlan (Iowa) interview President in morning about appointment of governor of Nebraska and in evening discuss problem of rehabilitation of Southern States. Paul M. Angle, ed., "The Recollections of William Pitt Kellogg," Abraham Lincoln Quarterly 3 (September 1945):332-35.

In conversation with Marquis de Chambrun, Lincoln "spoke at length of the many struggles he foresaw in the future and declared his firm resolution to stand for clemency against all opposition." Adolphe de Pineton, marquis de Chambrun, Impressions of Lincoln and the Civil War: A Foreigner's Account (New York: Random House, 1952), 93.

Visits Sec. Stanton in War Dept. about 5 P.M. and decides to revoke permission for convocation of Virginia Assembly. Flower, Stanton, 271-72.

Telegraphs Gen. Weitzel: "Is there any sign of the rebel Legislature coming together on the understanding of my letter to you? If there is any such sign, inform me what it is; if there is no such sign you may as [well] withdraw the offer." Abraham Lincoln to Godfrey Weitzel, 12 April 1865, CW, 8:405-6.

Explains to Weitzel that former Assoc. Justice J. A. Campbell is in error if he understands Confederate Legislature of Virginia is accepted as rightful legislature of State. It is but "the gentlemen who have acted as the Legislature of Virginia in support of the rebellion." However they have de facto power "to withdraw the Virginia troops, and other support from resistance to the General Government," and for this purpose they were encouraged to meet. Since Virginia troops have been captured by Gen. Grant, do not let them assemble. Abraham Lincoln to Godfrey Weitzel, 12 April 1865, CW, 8:406-8; Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 725.

Writes Weitzel: "I do not remember hearing prayers spoken of while I was in Richmond; but I have no doubt you have acted in what appeared to you to be the spirit and temper manifested by me while there." [ Stanton had reprimanded Weitzel for not ordering prayers for President in churches.] Abraham Lincoln to Godfrey Weitzel, 12 April 1865, CW, 8:405-6; Official Records—Armies 1, XLVI, pt. 3, 724.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President visits telegraph office early in morning. Exchanges pleasantries with operator, Charles A. Tinker, and goes to Sec. Stanton 's office. Bates, Telegraph Office, 206.

Interviews Gen. Grant and Stanton on military problems. Josiah G. Holland, The Life of Abraham Lincoln (Springfield, MA: G. Bill, 1866), 512.

Confers again with Sec. Welles regarding reestablishment of authority in Confederate States. Welles, Diary.

Rides horseback to Soldiers' Home. Discusses various topics with Asst. Sec. of Treasury Maunsell B. Field, who is riding in carriage. Appears weary and sad. Maunsell B. Field, Memories of Many Men and of Some Women (New York: Harper, 1874), 321.

Issues series of passes: to "visit Mobile, if, and when the city shall be in our possession;" to "our lines into Virginia & return;" and "to Richmond if he chooses." Pass for A. B. Darling, 13 April 1865, CW, 8:409; Pass for G. T. Jenkins and J. M. Hiatt, 13 April 1865, CW, 8:409; Pass for Robert C. Schenck, 13 April 1865, CW, 8:409; Pass for James W. Singleton, 13 April 1865, CW, 8:410.

President Lincoln writes to his friend and U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Davis regarding a conflict between Davis and U.S Attorney General James Speed. Davis is upset over a matter involving Speed and Judge Samuel C. Parks, who serves on the Idaho Territory's Supreme Court. Lincoln writes, "Seeing your letter was about our friend Sam. Parks, I handed it to . . . Speed without reading into it far enough to discover that you were a little sharp on him. He answers, however, in good temper, & I send it to you. It will never do for you and Mr. Speed to be on other than good understanding." Abraham Lincoln to David Davis, 13 April 1865, CW, 10:286-287.

Writes check to "Self" for $800.00. CW, 8:588.



Browse Month

Capt. Robert Lincoln arrives in Washington from scene of Gen. R. E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox, Va., in time for 8 A.M. breakfast with President. Helm, Mary, 259; Francis F. Browne, The Everyday Life of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Thompson, 1886), 701-2.

During morning Lincoln confers at length with Cong. Colfax (Ind.), who is preparing to visit West Coast. Willard H. Smith, Schuyler Colfax: The Changing Fortunes of a Political Idol (Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Collections, 1952), 207.

Interviews former Sen. Hale (N.H.), newly appointed minister to Spain, and goes for short drive with Gen. Grant, in town for cabinet meeting. Receives many members of Congress who call to congratulate him on successful conclusion of war. Francis F. Browne, The Everyday Life of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Thompson, 1886), 701-2.

Interviews William A. Howard, Detroit lawyer. James A. Bishop, The Day Lincoln was Shot (New York: Harper, 1955), 115.

Writes Gen. Van Alen: "I thank you for the assurance you give me that I shall be supported by conservative men like yourself, in the efforts I may make to restore the Union, so as to make it, to use your language, a Union of hearts and hands as well as of States." Abraham Lincoln to James H. Van Alen, 14 April 1865, CW, 8:413.

Visits cipher room of War Dept., tells Gen. Thomas T. Eckert of plans to attend theater, and invites him to come along. Bates, Telegraph Office, 367.

About 10 A.M. Gov. Swann (Md:) and Sen. Creswell (Md.) present memorandum concerning Maryland appointments. Memorandum Concerning Maryland Appointments, 14 April 1865, CW, 8:411.

At 11 A.M. cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

Grant reports to cabinet on surrender of Confederate forces at Appomattox, and Sec. Stanton presents draft of plan for reestablishing authority in Confederate States. Flower, Stanton, 301.

President tells several cabinet members about his recurring dream of ship "moving with great rapidity toward a dark and indefinite shore," that presages Union victories. David J. Harkness, "Lincoln and Byron, Lovers of Liberty," Lincoln Herald 43 (December 1941):9; Lamon, Recollections, 118-19; Frederick W. Seward, Reminiscences of a War-Time Statesman and Diplomat, 1830-1915. By Frederick W. Seward, Assistant Secretary of State during the Administrations of Lincoln, Johnson, and Hayes (New York: Putnam, 1916), 255.

Cabinet meeting lasts from 11 A.M. to 2 P.M. Informal discussion relative to what should be done about President Davis and other leaders of Confederacy. Frederick W. Seward, Reminiscences of a War-Time Statesman and Diplomat, 1830-1915. By Frederick W. Seward, Assistant Secretary of State during the Administrations of Lincoln, Johnson, and Hayes (New York: Putnam, 1916), 254-57; Lamon, Recollections, 248.

Between 2 and 3 P.M. President lunches with Mrs. Lincoln in private parlor. Francis F. Browne, The Everyday Life of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Thompson, 1886), 703-4.

Edward D. Neill, White House employee, sees President about signed commission. Rufus R. Wilson, ed., Intimate Memories of Lincoln (Elmira, NY: Primavera Press, 1942), 610.

Lincoln interviews Vice President Johnson at 3 P.M. Mrs. Nancy Bushrod, Negro woman, pushes by guards and sees President regarding husband's pay. James A. Bishop, The Day Lincoln was Shot (New York: Harper, 1955), 152.

Cong. Samuel Shellabarger (Ohio) calls on President at approximately 4 P.M. to discuss appointments. James A. Bishop, The Day Lincoln was Shot (New York: Harper, 1955), 162.

Asst. Sec. Dana reports to President at 4:30 P.M. that Jacob Thompson, Confederate agent in Canada, is now in U.S. making ready to sail for Europe. Should he be allowed to leave country? President is willing for him to leave. Charles A. Dana, Recollections of the Civil War. With the Leaders at Washington and in the Field in the Sixties (New York: Appleton, 1902), 172.

Sec. Hugh McCulloch makes friendly call on President. Hugh McCulloch, Men and Measures of Half a Century: Sketches and Comments (New York: Scribner, 1888), 222.

Around 5 P.M. Cong. Edward H. Rollins (N.H.) calls on President to get petition endorsed. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 14 April 1865, CW, 8:413.

In late afternoon President and Mrs. Lincoln go for drive. They stop at Navy Yard to view three monitors, damaged in Fort Fisher, N.C., engagement. President talks of time when they can return to Illinois and live quietly. Pratt, Personal Finances, 124; Rufus R. Wilson, ed., Intimate Memories of Lincoln (Elmira, NY: Primavera Press, 1942), 430.

Between 6 and 7 P.M. President and Mrs. Lincoln return from drive and find Gov. Richard J. Oglesby (Ill.) with other Illinois friends at White House. Reads four chapters of Petroleum V. Nasby's book [David R. Locke, The Nasby Papers . . . , Indianapolis, 1864.] to Oglesby and Gen. Isham N. Haynie. Edwin C. Haynie, "At the Death-bed of Lincoln," Century Magazine 51 (April 1896):954; Helm, Mary, 255.

After supper President interviews Cong. Colfax (Ind.) relative to special session of Congress and order of Gen. Weitzel. Former Cong. Cornelius Cole (Calif.) accompanies Colfax. Willard H. Smith, Schuyler Colfax: The Changing Fortunes of a Political Idol (Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Collections, 1952), 207-8; Henry B. Rankin, Intimate Character Sketches of Abraham Lincoln (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1924), 282.

At 8 P.M. former Cong. Ashmun (Mass.) sees President regarding cotton claim against government. President gives him appointment as follows: "Allow Mr. Ashmun &friend to come in at 9 A.M. to-morrow." [Ashmun considered this Lincoln's last autograph.] Card of Admission for George Ashmun, 14 April 1865, CW, 8:413.

President exchanges few words with former Cong. Arnold (Ill.) while getting in carriage to go to theater. Arnold, 431.

At approximately 8:30 P.M. President and Mrs. Lincoln, accompanied by Clara Harris and Maj. Henry R. Rathbone, enter Ford's Theatre for performance of "Our American Cousin" featuring Laura Keene. Washington Chronicle, 16 April 1865; Washington Star, 14 April 1865.

[Exact time of assassination is not agreed upon. After extensive research Otto Eisenschiml wrote:] "It is therefore safe to say that Booth fired his shot at or close to 13 minutes past 10 P.M." Otto Eisenschiml, In the Shadow of Lincoln's Death (New York: Funk, 1940), 353.

Shortly afterward President, completely insensible, is moved across street to house of William Petersen, 453 10th St. NW., and placed upon bed in small room at rear of hall on ground floor. Mrs. Lincoln stays near her husband. Robert Lincoln and John Hay come from White House. Dr. Stone tells Robert there is no hope. Family and others whose official or private relations to President give them right to be present begin their long night wait for death to overtake him. John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln: Condensed from Nicolay & Hay's Abraham Lincoln: A History (New York: Century, 1923), 539-40; Arnold, 433.



Browse Month

Surgeons maintain constant observation of President through night. About 2 A.M. Vice President pays call. Dawn finds Mrs. Lincoln and Robert still waiting in Petersen's house. James A. Bishop, The Day Lincoln was Shot (New York: Harper, 1955), 268.

Dr. Charles S. Taft at bedside records his observations: President stops breathing "at 7:21 and 55 seconds in the morning of April 15th, and 7:22 and 10 seconds his pulse ceased to beat." Otto Eisenschiml, In the Shadow of Lincoln's Death (New York: Funk, 1940), 351; Henry J. Raymond, The Life and Public Services of Abraham Lincoln . . . Together with his State Papers, including his Speeches, Addresses, Messages, Letters, and Proclamations and the Closing Scenes Connected with his Life and Death (New York: Derby & Miller, 1865), 783-801.

Silence follows and is broken by voice of Sec. Stanton: "Now he belongs to the ages." John G. Nicolay and John Hay, Abraham Lincoln: A History, 10 vols. (New York: Century, 1890), 10:302.