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31 entries found


Browse Month

Revised Entry

Lincoln writes to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton and intercedes on behalf of a "poor widow, by the name of Baird." Lincoln explains, "[She] has a son in the Army, that . . . has been sentenced to serve a long time without pay, or . . . with very little pay. I do not like this punishment of withholding pay—it falls so very hard upon poor families. After he has been serving in this way for several months, at the tearful appeal of the poor Mother, I made a direction that he be allowed to enlist for a new term . . . She now comes, and says she can not get it acted upon. Please do it." Lincoln to Stanton, 1 March 1864, Edwin M. Stanton Papers, Library of Congress, Washington DC; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 1 March 1864, CW, 7:217.

Sends to Senate nomination of Gen. Grant to be lieutenant general. Washington Star, 2 March 1864.

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

"This evening the President and Mrs. Lincoln will entertain at the Executive Mansion the members of Congress and their families . . . no cards of invitation have been issued to any other person." Washington National Republican, 1 March 1864, 2 March 1864.

On letter of this date from Sec. Chase, introducing "Mr. Metcalf" who wishes to paint Lincoln's portrait, he writes, "Nix." Chase to Lincoln, 1 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

Lincoln sends autograph to New England Kitchen, connected with Brooklyn Sanitary Fair, as means of raising funds. Abraham Lincoln to the New England Kitchen, 2 March 1864, CW, 7:220.

Interviews Messrs. Chase and Earl of Toledo, Ohio, about appointment of postmaster. Sherman to Lincoln, 2 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Cong. Abel C. Wilder (Kans.) confers with President regarding Kansas affairs. Seward to Lincoln, 2 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln, while sitting for F. B. Carpenter, recites soliloquy of King in "Hamlet" from memory. Carpenter, Six Months, 49.

With family visits Grover's Theatre for Edwin Booth's appearance in "Hamlet." Washington Chronicle, 3 March 1864.



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Revised Entry

President confers with Committee on Conduct of War regarding commander of Army of Potomac. U.S. Congress, Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, 3 vols., 38th Cong., 2d sess. (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1865), I, xix.

Interviews Mrs. James Moran, who asks that her minor son be released from service. Morgan, Rhinehart & Co. to Lincoln, 3 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Receives report that Maine Legislature has adopted resolutions to continue present administration. Blaine to Lincoln, 3 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Confers with Sec. Welles on promotion of Col. J. R. Hawley and vote of thanks to Commodore Cadwalader Ringgold (USN). Welles, Diary.

Approves speech of Gen. Steele to people of Arkansas and thanks him for it. Abraham Lincoln to Frederick Steele, 3 March 1864, CW, 7:221-22.

Lincoln writes to General-in-Chief Henry W. Halleck regarding Colonel Thomas L. Alexander. Alexander is the Deputy Governor of the Soldiers' Home, Lincoln's retreat located outside of Washington, D. C. Lincoln writes, "The relations between Col. T. L. Alexander and myself . . . have been very agreeable, and I feel great kindness for him and his family. I therefore shall be personally obliged, if you can, consistently with the public service, assign him some duty at Louisville, Ky., suitable to a retired officer." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 3 March 1864, CW, 10:228; Elizabeth Smith Brownstein, Lincoln's Other White House: The Untold Story of the Man and His Presidency (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2005), 73;Virginia Jeans Laas, ed., Wartime Washington: The Civil War Letters of Elizabeth Blair Lee (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1991), 145n; Matthew Pinsker, Lincoln's Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers' Home (New York: Oxford Press, 2003), 168.



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Rear Adm. Dahlgren calls at White House for news of his son, Ulric. Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin F. Butler, 4 March 1864, CW, 7:222.

H. Villard interviews Lincoln for permission to publish letters exchanged between President and Sec. Chase relating to Pomeroy secret circular. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 4 March 1864, CW, 7:222-23.

J. W. White, New York antislavery leader, calls on Lincoln and suggests that Gen. Grant be made general in chief responsible only to President. White to Lincoln, 4 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

"A pleasant Cabinet meeting." Chase and Postmaster Gen. Blair absent. Secs. Seward and Stanton have private laugh about what they regard as Chase's "dilemma" concerning decision to run for President. Welles, Diary.

President and family visit Grover's Theatre to see Edwin Booth play "Richelieu." Washington Chronicle, 5 March 1864.

Lincoln deposits January salary warrant for $2,022.33 in Riggs Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.

Writes memorandum about churches: "I have written before, and now repeat, the United States Government must not undertake to run the churches. . . . It will not do for the United States to appoint trustees, supervisors, or other agents for the churches." Memorandum about Churches, 4 March 1864, CW, 7:223.



Browse Month

President proclaims ratification of treaty with Great Britain settling claims of Hudson's Bay and Puget's Sound Agricultural Companies. Washington Chronicle, 11 March 1864.

Receives February salary warrant for $2,022.34. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.

Mrs. Lincoln holds Saturday afternoon reception. Washington National Republican, 5 March 1864.



Browse Month

President and Sec. Stanton call at Rear Adm. Dahlgren's residence with telegram from Gen. Butler announcing that Dahlgren's son, on raid against Richmond, is alive. Welles, Diary.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President issues order establishing starting point of Union Pacific Railroad on western boundary of state of Iowa. Order Designating Starting Point of Union Pacific Railroad, 7 March 1864, CW, 7:228.

Directs that application of French government to import tobacco from insurgent territory be granted. Order in Regard to Export of Tobacco, 7 March 1864, CW, 7:229.

Interviews Gov. Willard P. Hall (Mo.) on status of affairs in Missouri. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 7 March 1864, CW, 7:230.

Congratulates Queen Victoria on birth of grandson. Abraham Lincoln to Queen Victoria, 7 March 1864, CW, 7:231.

Attends Grover's Theatre for performance of Edwin Booth in "The Fool's Revenge." Washington Chronicle, 8 March 1864.

Telegraphs Gen. Butler: "Gen. Meade has Richmond Sentinel, saying that Col. Dahlgren was killed, and ninety of his men captured at King & Queen C. H. When did Kilpatrick's informant last see Col. Dahlgren?" Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin F. Butler, 7 March 1864, CW, 7:226.

Lincoln writes to Congressman John A. J. Creswell, of Maryland, regarding a move to end slavery in that state. Lincoln writes, "I am very anxious for emancipation to be effected . . . I think it probable that my expressions of a preference for gradual over immediate emancipation, are misunderstood. . . . My wish is that all who are for emancipation inanyform, shall co-operate, all treating all respectfully . . . What I have dreaded is the danger that by jealousies, rivalries, and consequent ill-blood . . . the friends of emancipation themselves may divide, and lose the measure altogether." Abraham Lincoln to John A. J. Creswell, 7 March 1864, CW, 7:226-27.



Browse Month

President Lincoln meets Gen. Grant face to face for first time. Nicolay, Lincoln's Secretary, 195-96; Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs, 2 vols. (London: Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, 1886), 2:121.

Interviews Col. Marcellus Mundy regarding use of property in Mound City, Ill., for government hospital. Mundy to Lincoln, 8 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Receives report that New Hampshire elections have gone to Union ticket by large majority. Rollins and Chandler to Lincoln, 8 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President and Mrs. Lincoln begin receiving guests at 8 P.M. Tremendous crowd. Grant arrives at 9:30 P.M. Washington Star, 9 March 1864; Welles, Diary.

Lincoln confers with Grant about ceremony following day, when new commission of lieutenant general will be presented Grant. John G. Nicolay and John Hay, Abraham Lincoln: A History, 10 vols. (New York: Century, 1890), 8:340-41; William E. Curtis, The True Abraham Lincoln (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1903), 255-56.

Promenades with Mrs. W. H. Seward, Grant with Mrs. Lincoln. Memoranda, 8 March 1864, 9 March 1864, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

President presents commission as lieutenant general to Gen. Grant at 1 P.M. in cabinet chamber in presence of cabinet, Gens. Halleck and John A. Rawlins, Cong. Lovejoy (Ill.), and John Nicolay. Washington Chronicle, 10 March 1864; Washington Star, 9 March 1864.

Reads brief remarks: "The nation's appreciation of what you have done, and it's reliance upon you for what remains to do, in the existing great struggle, are now presented with this commission, constituting you Lieutenant General in the Army of the United States." Grant replies: "I feel the full weight of the responsibilities now devolving on me and know that if they are met it will be due to those armies, and above all to the favor of that Providence which leads both Nations and men." Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs, 2 vols. (London: Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, 1886), 2:114-16; Speech to Ulysses S. Grant, [9 March 1864], CW, 7:234-35.

Following ceremony President hears half-hour discussion of military affairs and operations of Gen. Sherman. Welles, Diary.

In afternoon receives copy of Sec. Chase's letter withdrawing from presidential race. Memoranda, 9 March 1864, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Telegraphs Gen. Meade: "New York City votes 9,500 majority for allowing soldiers to vote, and the rest of the State nearly all on the same side. Tell the soldiers." Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 9 March 1864, CW, 7:233.

Transmits to Senate report from secretary of interior respecting points of commencement of Union Pacific Railroad. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 9 March 1864, CW, 7:233-34.



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Revised Entry

President assigns Lt. Gen. Grant to command Armies of United States. Order Assigning Ulysses S. Grant to Command of the Armies of the U.S., [10] March 1864, CW, 7:236.

President and Vice President are provided free postage in bill passed by Senate. Washington Chronicle, 11 March 1864.

Lincoln interviews James M. Scovel of Philadelphia on political affairs. Scovel to Lincoln, 9 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

With Mrs. Lincoln visits Grover's Theatre for performance of "Richard III," last night in series of Shakespearean dramas featuring Edwin Booth. Grant has reservation but does not attend. Washington Star, 11 March 1864; Washington Chronicle, 11 March 1864.

On behalf of "Mrs. L.," President Lincoln invites Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant and General George Meade "to dine with us Saturday evening." Lincoln asks Grant to "notify [Meade] . . . and answer whether you can be with us at that time." Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 10 March 1864, CW, 7:235.

Instructs Gen. Ramsay, if Absterdam projectile is offered at Hotchkiss prices, take it. "I am for the government having the best articles, in spite of patent controversies." Abraham Lincoln to George D. Ramsay, 10 March 1864, CW, 7:236-37.



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Revised Entry

Cabinet meets. Gen. Grant interrupts to tell President of plan to leave for Nashville. Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs, 2 vols. (London: Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, 1886), 2:118; Welles, Diary.

Gen. Alexander M. McCook calls on President. McCook to Nicolay, 11 March 1864, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President Lincoln writes to Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase concerning Miss Rosie Bielaski. Lincoln explains, "[She] calls on me saying she has been discharged from her place as a clerk in your Department." Lincoln notes, "Her father was a Pole, whom I knew in Illinois, more than twenty years ago," and who died in one of the Civil War's "earliest battles, and left the family destitute." Lincoln adds, "I should be very glad for her to have a place, if it can be, consistently with the service." Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 11 March 1864, CW, 10:230.



Browse Month

President's General Orders No. 98: 1. Gen. Halleck is relieved as General in Chief of Army, and Lt. Gen. Grant is assigned to command Armies of United States. 2. Gen. Halleck is assigned to duty in Washington as Chief of Staff. 3. Gen. Sherman is assigned to command of Military Division of Mississippi. 4. Gen. James B. McPherson is assigned to command of Department and Army of Tennessee. General Orders No. 98, 12 March 1864, CW, 7:239-40.

President communicates to Senate report and papers relative to colonization of persons of African descent. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 12 March 1864, CW, 7:241.

Confers with Gov. James Y. Smith (R.I.) about consolidating 1st and 3d Cavalry. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 12 March 1864, CW, 7:241.

Receives evidence that Knights of Pythias are not a treasonable organization and dismisses their representatives. LL, No. 1005.

Attends regular Saturday afternoon reception between 1 and 3 P.M. Washington Star, 12 March 1864.

Invites Gen. Lewis Wallace to Executive Mansion for dinner with "some other General officers" at 6:45 P.M. Abraham Lincoln to Lewis Wallace, 12 March 1864, CW, 7:241.

Entertains party of about 15 military men at White House banquet. Guests include Gens. Meade, Wool (retd.), Hunter, Sickles, Doubleday, and McCook. Grant accepted invitation, but is out of town. Washington Chronicle, 15 March 1864; Washington Star, 14 March 1864.

[Irwin deposits in Springfield Marine Bank $185, balance of principal and interest on J. K. and T. Lewis note. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165.]



Browse Month

Revised Entry

J. H. Hackett, in Washington for week's theatrical engagement, visits Lincoln. Hackett to Lincoln, 9 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Judge Hughes interviews President on behalf of A. Montgomery. Montgomery to Cameron, 20 March 1864, Simon Cameron Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln writes to Governor Michael Hahn and congratulates him on his recent election. Lincoln notes that Hahn will be remembered "as the first-free-state Governor of Louisiana." Lincoln suggests an agenda for the upcoming state constitutional convention. He advocates giving the vote to "some of the colored people," specifically, "the very intelligent, and especially those who have fought gallantly in our ranks." Lincoln adds, "But this is only a suggestion, not to the public, but to you alone." Abraham Lincoln to Michael Hahn, 13 March 1864, CW, 7:243.

Informs Gen. Schurz that he cannot take part in approaching political canvass without separating from military service. Abraham Lincoln to Carl Schurz, 13 March 1864, CW, 7:243-44.



Browse Month

President issues call and orders draft for 200,000 men for military services. Draft Order for 200,000 Men, 14 March 1864, CW, 7:245.

Transmits to Congress treaty with Great Britain regarding claims of Hudson's Bay and Puget's Sound Agricultural Companies and recommends "appropriation to carry into effect the first, second, and third articles thereof." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 14 March 1864, CW, 7:246-47.

Receives Gov. Curtin (Pa.) at 7 P.M. on official business. Curtin to Lincoln, 14 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Transmits to Senate report of secretary of interior regarding sale of Wea trust lands in Kansas. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [14] March 1864, CW, 7:246.

Invites early attention of Congress to convention with Ecuador requiring appointment of commissioners to adjust claims. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 14 March 1864, CW, 7:247.



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Revised Entry

President directs land and naval forces to assist Gen. Sickles on official tour from Washington by way of Cairo, Ill., and New Orleans. [See February 15, 1864, February 25, 1864.] Abraham Lincoln to Whom It May Concern, 15 March 1864, CW, 7:250.

Notifies Gov. Hahn (La.): "You are hereby invested with the powers exercised hitherto by the Military Governor of Louisiana." Abraham Lincoln to Michael Hahn, 15 March 1864, CW, 7:248.

Interviews "gallant drummer boy," Robert H. Hendershot, who rendered meritorious service at Battle of Fredericksburg, and gives him letter to Sec. Stanton. Bell I. Wiley, "Boys in Blue," Abraham Lincoln Quarterly 6 (September 1951):429; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 15 March 1864, CW, 7:249.

Receives Gen. G. R. Davis upon introduction by Sen. Harris (N.Y.). Harris to Lincoln, 15 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets and discusses issuance of proclamation calling for draft of 200,000 men. Welles, Diary.

President Lincoln annotates a letter from Elijah Guion, Thomas Sloo, and John B. Morison, who represent St. Paul's Church, in New Orleans, Louisiana. The men object to the military's effort to take the "Church keys and property." Lincoln writes, "[T]he U.S. should not appoint trustees for or in any way take charge of any church as such. If the building is needed for military purposes, take it; if it is not so needed, let its church people have it, dealing with any disloyal people among them, as you deal with other disloyal people." John B. Morison, Elijah Guion, and Thomas Sloo to Abraham Lincoln, 5 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Endorsement Concerning Churches in New Orleans, 15 March 1864, CW, 7:247-48.



Browse Month

Congress approves act extending franking privilege to all mail matter to or from President and Vice President. Washington Chronicle, 19 March 1864.

Lincoln inquires of Gov. Murphy (Ark.): "What of your election on the 14th.?" Abraham Lincoln to Isaac Murphy, 16 March 1864, CW, 7:250-51.



Browse Month

Lincoln requests Gen. Butler to telegraph, if "you obtain the remains of Col. Dahlgren." Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin F. Butler, 17 March 1864, CW, 7:251.

Writes Cong. Creswell (Md.): "It needs not be a secret, that I wish success to emancipation in Maryland. It would aid much to end the rebellion." Abraham Lincoln to John A. J. Creswell, 17 March 1864, CW, 7:251.



Browse Month

Cabinet meets. Sec. Seward reads proposed bill for law on emigration. Welles, Diary.

President and Mrs. Lincoln on invitation attend closing night of fair held in Patent Office for benefit of Christian Commission and District volunteers. Lincoln makes brief speech, ending: "God bless the women of America." Washington Star, 19 March 1864; Washington Chronicle, 19 March 1864; Sidney Kramer, "Lincoln at the Fair," Abraham Lincoln Quarterly, 3 (September 1945):341-42; Remarks at Closing of Sanitary Fair, Washington, D. C., 18 March 1864, CW, 7:253-54.

Writes recommendation for Benjamin A. Watson of Springfield, Ill., who wants commission of post sutler for Camp Butler, Ill.: he is "an intimate acquaintance and friend, and is of good character, and good qualification for the business he seeks. . . . I know nothing of the particular case." Endorsement Concerning Benjamin A. Watson, 18 March 1864, CW, 7:252-53.

Sends Sec. Stanton descriptions of several types of prisoners of war that might well be discharged. "I shall be glad therefore to have your cheerful assent to the discharge of those whose names I may send." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 18 March 1864, CW, 7:254-57.



Browse Month

President recommends discharge of 16 Indians as named. DNA—WR RG 107, Off. Sec. War, EB 6, Entry 165.

Attends Saturday afternoon reception given by Mrs. Lincoln. Washington National Republican, 19 March 1864.



Browse Month

W. O. Stoddard returns to White House after recovering from typhoid and finds Lincoln resting on office lounge. They talk of many things, including Gen. Grant. William O. Stoddard, Inside the White House in War Times (New York: C. L. Webster, 1890), 219-22.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President interviews Miss Susan Dugger and Miss Beattie from Illinois and gives them note to Postmaster Gen. Blair. Abraham Lincoln to Montgomery Blair, 21 March 1864, CW, 7:257-58.

Approves "An Act to enable the people of Nevada to form a Constitution and State Government, and for the admission of such State into the Union on an equal Footing with the original States." Proclamation Admitting Nevada into the Union, 31 October 1864, CW, 8:83-84; Don C. Seitz, Lincoln the Politician: How the Rail-Splitter and Flatboatman Played the Great American Game (New York: Coward-McCann, 1931), 408.

At 12 M. committee from New York Workingmen's Democratic Republican Association calls on President and presents address, to which Lincoln replies: "You comprehend, as your address shows, that the existing rebellion, . . . is, in fact, a war upon the rights of all working people." Washington Chronicle, 22 March 1864; Reply to New York Workingmen's Democratic Republican Association, 21 March 1864, CW, 7:259-60.

President Lincoln writes to siblings Clara Brown and Julia Brown and thanks the children for sending him an "Afghan." The Browns, of Buffalo, New York, asked Lincoln to "remember that you have little friends in Buffalo who pray for you." Lincoln answers, "I especially like my little friends; and although you have never seen me, I am glad you remember me for the country's sake, and even more, that you remember, and try to help, the poor Soldiers." Clara Brown and Julia Brown to Abraham Lincoln, 9 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Clara and Julia Brown, 21 March 1864, CW, 7:258.



Browse Month

President lays before Senate treaty with Shawnee Indians. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 22 March 1864, CW, 7:261.

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

Despite snowstorm last evening there is fine attendance at public reception of President and Mrs. Lincoln, 8:30 to 11 P.M. Washington Star, 23 March 1864; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 23 March 1864, 2d ed., 2:4.

Lincoln's thought on slavery: "I never knew a man who wished to be himself a slave. Consider if you know any good thing, that no man desires for himself." On Slavery, 22 March 1864, CW, 7:260-61.



Browse Month

Sens. Wade (Ohio) and Chandler (Mich.) again call on Lincoln demanding removal of Gen. Meade. Thomas Harry Williams, Lincoln and the Radicals (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1941), 340.

Lincoln sends note to Gen. Schenck (resigned) as explanation of embarrassing incident at reception last evening. Abraham Lincoln to Robert C. Schenck, 23 March 1864, CW, 7:262.

Answers request of Gen. Schurz for permission to join political campaign: "Nor could I be justified to detail any officer to the political campaign during its continuance, and then return him to the Army." Abraham Lincoln to Carl Schurz, 23 March 1864, CW, 7:262-63.



Browse Month

President summons Sen. Doolittle (Wis.) to White House for conference. Abraham Lincoln to James R. Doolittle, 24 March 1864, CW, 7:265.

Sends to Senate report regarding establishment of monarchical governments in Central and South America. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 24 March 1864, CW, 7:265-66.

Interviews former Gov. Newell (N.J.) on military problems. Newell to Lincoln, 24 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Confers with John Hay; reviews report on political situation in Florida. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Spends evening with Gen. Grant at White House. Chicago Tribune, 25 March 1864; Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs, 2 vols. (London: Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, 1886), 2:121-22.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

Cabinet meets. Sec. Welles calls attention to scarcity of seamen. Suggests transfer of 12,000 men from Army to Navy. Welles, Diary.

Lincoln in his study all evening with F. B. Carpenter. Talks Shakespeare. Recites poem, "Oh! Why should the spirit of mortal be proud?" Carpenter, Six Months, 58.

President Lincoln writes to Commissioner of Public Buildings Benjamin B. French regarding a bill in Congress that removes French's position "from the control of the Department of the Interior, and . . . enlarg[es] the powers and patronage of your office." Lincoln continues, "The proposed change may be right for aught I know." But, Lincoln adds, "[I]f the change is made, I do not think I can allow you to retain the office; because that would be encouraging officers to be constantly intriguing, to the detriment of the public interest, in order to profit themselves." Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin B. French, 25 March 1864, CW, 7:266-67.

Asks Thurlow Weed if it is true that he is hurt because one of his suggestions on how to run affairs of government was not followed. Abraham Lincoln to Thurlow Weed, 25 March 1864, CW, 7:268-69.



Browse Month

President interviews Sec. Welles in morning relative to transferring 12,000 men from Army to Navy. Welles, Diary.

Further defines cases entitled to benefits of December 8, 1863, Amnesty Proclamation. Proclamation About Amnesty, 26 March 1864, CW, 7:269-70.

Discusses Negro enlistment in Kentucky with Gov. Bramlette (Ky.), former Sen. Archibald Dixon (Ky.), and Albert G. Hodges, editor of Frankfort, Ky., "Commonwealth," presented by Atty. Gen. Bates. Bates, Diary.

In afternoon sends for Welles and Asst. Sec. Fox and requests order for transfer of 12,000 men from Army to Navy. Welles, Diary.

[John Nicolay arrives in New York to represent President at conference with Thurlow Weed concerning political conditions and patronage. Nicolay to Lincoln, 30 March 1864, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.]



Browse Month

President at War Dept. in evening for conference with Gens. Grant and Halleck and secretary of war. Washington Star, 28 March 1864; Washington Chronicle, 28 March 1864.



Browse Month

President disturbed in morning by Francis Xavier, who reaches Lincoln's room and begins speech proving that Xavier was elected President in 1856. Washington Star, 28 March 1864; Washington Chronicle, 29 March 1864.

Consults with Gov. Bramlette (Ky.) on troop quotas and drafting of Negroes. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 28 March 1864, CW, 7:272.

Receives note from Peter McConnell of Kansas, who wishes to present Rocky Mountain pony to Tad. McConnell to Lincoln, 28 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

Sec. Welles accompanies group or rear admirals, including Hiram Paulding (retd.) commanding Navy Yard at New York, C. H. Davis, Chief, Bureau of Navigation, S. H. Stringham (retd.), special duty, and Francis H. Gregory (retd.), superintending construction of gunboats, to White House and introduces them to President. Washington Star, 29 March 1864.

Lincoln, Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, and others agree that Capt. Kinney should be recommended to Gen. Grant. Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 29 March 1864, CW, 7:272.

President writes Gen. Meade that there is no need for court of inquiry regarding publication of accounts discrediting Meade's operations at Gettysburg. Abraham Lincoln to George G. Meade, 29 March 1864, CW, 7:273-74.

Transmits to Congress report of Charles B. Stuart, consulting engineer of New York, regarding improvements to pass gunboats from tidewater to northern and northwestern lakes. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 29 March 1864, CW, 7:274.



Browse Month

Wisconsin Union State Convention at Milwaukee endorses Lincoln for reelection. Washington Chronicle, 1 April 1864.

James A. Hamilton,, Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., invites President and Mrs. Lincoln to Metropolitan Fair as his guests. Hamilton to Lincoln, 30 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

[John Nicolay in New York writes President about conversation with Gen. Schurz. Nicolay to Lincoln, 30 March 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.]



Browse Month

President interviews Col. Thomas Worthington (resigned) and states in writing: "I did not think him fit for a Colonel." Memorandum Concerning Thomas Worthington, 31 March 1864, CW, 7:276.

Confers with Gen. Wallace on progress of bringing together Gov. Bradford (Md.) and Cong. Davis (Md.) on subject of emancipation. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 31 March 1864, CW, 7:276-77.

Writes Sec. Stanton that Wallace is getting along very satisfactorily. "I have told him to be fair, but to give the benefit of all doubts to the emancipationists." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 31 March 1864, CW, 7:276-77.

Asks Stanton for favor: "I sincerely wish that something satisfactory to Lt. Col. Scates—an old personal friend & most worthy gentleman—may be done for him." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 31 March 1864, CW, 7:277.

[About this date sends check for $50.00 to Dennis Hanks, second cousin and boyhood companion. Hanks to Lincoln, 5 April 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.]