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27 entries found


Browse Month

President directs Sec. Stanton to have transport sent to Negro colony established on Ile à Vache and to bring back all who wish to return. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 1 February 1864, CW, 7:164-65.

Orders that draft for 500,000 men, to serve for three years or during war, be made on March 10, 1864 next. Order for Draft of 500,000 Men, 1 February 1864, CW, 7:164.

Interviews Capt. Ulric Dahlgren, who has waited from 11 A.M. until 4 P.M. They discuss personal and military matters while Lincoln is being shaved. Dahlgren to Dahlgren, 1 February 1864, John A. Dahlgren Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

President sends message of sorrow to Kamehameha V, King of Hawaiian Islands, on death of brother. Abraham Lincoln to Kamehameha V, 2 February 1864, CW, 7:165.

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

President and Mrs. Lincoln attend second anniversary meeting of U.S. Christian Commission in House of Representatives. Washington Chronicle, 3 February 1864.

President issues order approving new trade regulations insofar as they annul restrictions on trade in West Virginia within Union lines. Order Approving Regulations of Trade, 2 February 1864, CW, 7:166.



Browse Month

President authorizes use of government property in Springfield, Ill., for soldiers' home. Abraham Lincoln to Richard Yates, 3 February 1864, CW, 7:167.

Interviews C. K. Hawkes, who represents former Cong. Ashmun (Mass.), probably about cotton. Ashmun to Lincoln, 2 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Visits Arsenal to observe trials of Absterdam shell. Browning, Diary.



Browse Month

President sends to Edward Everett "the manuscript of my remarks at Gettysburg" for delivery to Ladies Committee of New York Metropolitan Sanitary Fair. Abraham Lincoln to Edward Everett, 4 February 1864, CW, 7:167-68.

Transmits to Senate correspondence between Union and Confederate authorities on exchange of prisoners. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 4 February 1864, CW, 7:168.

Interviews Dr. Zacharie and Goodman L. Mordecai of South Carolina, who thanks President for releasing him from Washington prison where he had been confined as Confederate agent. Bertram W. Korn, American Jewry and the Civil War (Philadelphia, PA: Jewish Publication Society of America, 1951), 199.

President hosts State dinner for "members of the foreign legations and other distinguished guests." Mrs. Goddard is one of the dinner guests. Daily National Republican, 5 February 1864, 2d ed., 2:4; CW, 8:531.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

Associate Supreme Court Justice David Davis and friends visit Lincoln in afternoon. David Davis to Abraham Lincoln, 5 February 1864, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Receives January salary warrant for $2,022.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.

Transmits to Senate report from secretary of state regarding reciprocity treaty with Sandwich Islands. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 5 February 1864, CW, 7:169.

Lincoln writes a comment on a letter addressed to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton from Richard M. Edwards, who seeks clarification regarding a United States "oath of office requir[ement]." Edwards, of Tennessee, wishes to lead a Union regiment, but previously, he was "forced . . . to take an oath 'to support the confederate constitution.'" Lincoln writes, "On principle I dislike an oath which requires a man to swear he has not done wrong. It rejects the Christian principle of forgiveness on terms of repentance. I think it is enough if the man does no wrong hereafter." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 5 February 1864, CW, 7:169-70.

President Lincoln and his son attend Grover's Theatre to see Felicita Vestvali in the "Duke's Motto" Daily National Republican, 6 February 1864, 2d ed., 2:2.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

Lincoln makes one of many sick calls on Cong. Lovejoy (Ill.) and remarks: "This war is eating my life out. I have a strong impression that I shall not live to see the end." Edgar DeW. Jones, Lincoln and the Preachers (New York: Harper, 1948), 69.

During afternoon reception discusses with Francis B. Carpenter, artist, ideas for portraying first reading of Emancipation Proclamation. William O. Stoddard, Lincoln's Third Secretary: The Memoirs of William O. Stoddard, ed. by William O. Stoddard, Jr. (New York: Exposition Press, 1955), 221.

At night O. H. Browning approaches Lincoln on behalf of Mrs. Fitz, who owns slaves and cotton and is a refugee. President, in bad humor, will not discuss matter. Browning, Diary.

[Irwin withdraws $24 from Springfield Marine Bank, to pay insurance on Lincoln's Springfield home. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]

"Reception by Mrs. Lincoln exceeded all that have preceded it." Washington Star, 10 February 1864.

Lincoln writes to Major General Nathaniel P. Banks concerning an assignment for Gustavus Scroggs, of Buffalo, New York. Lincoln explains, "Scroggs . . . has been appointed colonel of a colored regiment, and is to report with it to you at New Orleans." Lincoln proposes that Banks order Scroggs's regiment "to Texas, charged to collect and organize the colored men of that State, it being believed that such a nucleus as this regiment, and such an experienced organizer of troops as Col. Scroggs . . . will prove highly successful." Abraham Lincoln to Nathaniel P. Banks, 6 February 1864, CW, 7:170-71; Samuel P. Bates, History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-5 (Harrisburg: B. Singerly, 1871), 1026.



Browse Month

President endorses request of Union man, impressed into Confederate service: "Mr. [Cong. Portus] Baxter of Vermont is very anxious to have the request granted at once." Endorsement: Release of A. H. Gray, 7 February 1864, CW, 7:171.



Browse Month

President interviews Sen. Doolittle (Wis.) and makes known to him certain views of Sec. Stanton . Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 8 February 1864, CW, 7:174.

Accompanied by family, visits Washington Theatre to see Laura Keene in drama "Sea of Ice." Washington Star, 9 February 1864; Daily National Republican, 9 February 1864, 2d ed., 3:1.

[Irwin withdraws $33.55 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]

Lincoln assures Gov. Isaac Murphy (Ark.) that Gen. Steele will support Murphy's plan to organize state government. Abraham Lincoln to Isaac Murphy, 8 February 1864, CW, 7:173-74.



Browse Month

Lincoln confers with F. B. Carpenter in White House study. Judge Adv. Gen. Holt calls and remains most of morning. In afternoon several cabinet members visit Lincoln. At 3 P.M. President and Carpenter walk to M. B. Brady's studio. Several photographs made, including one later used on $5 bill. Carpenter, Six Months, 32; Frederick H. Meserve and Carl Sandburg, The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1944), 9 February 1864.

Evening White House levee largest of season. Robert Lincoln attends. President in good health. Washington Star, 10 February 1864; Washington National Republican, 10 February 1864.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President devotes morning to courtmartial cases. Receives public at 1 P.M. Carpenter, Six Months, 39.

Delegation of 18 gentlemen from convention at Allegheny City, Pa., calls on President to discuss amending Constitution in favor of freedom. Washington Chronicle, 15 February 1864.

President's private stables, brick building between Executive Mansion and Treasury Dept., "took fire and burned down" at 8:30 P.M. Nicolay to Hay, 10 February 1864, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

In the evening, a fire destroys President Lincoln's "private stables." A newspaper reports, "[Mr.] Cooper, the President's private coachman, left the stable to get his supper about 8 o'clock, and he was first notified of the fire by the President himself, who discovered the smoke . . . The building . . . contained . . . six horses, all of which were burned to death . . . One of these ponies was all the more highly prized, in consequence of having once been the property of Willie, the deceased son of Mr. and Mrs. President Lincoln." Robert W. McBride, Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln (Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill, 1926), 44-46; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 11 February 1864, 3:1.

President's two horses, John Nicolay's two horses, and Tad's two ponies are lost. Washington Chronicle, 11 February 1864.

Hours later, "Lincoln and others were standing in the East Room looking at the still burning stables. Lincoln was weeping. Tad explained it was because Willie's pony was there." Robert W. McBride, Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln (Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill, 1926), 44-45.

Mrs. Lincoln continues to send flowers to Sanitary Fair. Washington Chronicle, 10 February 1864.



Browse Month

President interviews G. A. Van Duyn of Springfield, Ill., regarding permit to trade South. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 11 February 1864, CW, 7:178.

Endorses recommendation that $800,000 be appropriated by Congress to reimburse Pennsylvania for cost of militia in U.S. service. Endorsement Concerning Pennsylvania Militia, 11 February 1864, CW, 7:178.

Confers with Commissioner French relative to rebuilding White House stables. Globe, 595.

Interviews George Marshall of St. Louis on business, following introduction by Cong. William R. Morrison (Ill.). Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 16 February 1864, CW, 7:189; Morrison to Lincoln, 11 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Robert consults his father on point of law. Two unidentified Kentucky gentlemen visit Lincoln. Carpenter, Six Months, 45.

Committee from Synod of Reformed Presbyterian Church solicits support of President for amendment to Constitution extending freedom. Washington Star, 12 February 1864.

Patterson McGee, dismissed as President's coachman on day White House stables burned, is arrested on charge of having started fire. Washington Chronicle, 12 February 1864.

President inquires of Sec. Stanton what is to be done about War Dept. order giving Bishop Edward R. Ames control and possession of all Methodist churches in certain southern military departments. "'I will not have control of any church on any side.'" Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 11 February 1864, CW, 7:178-80.



Browse Month

"Little of particular importance in the Cabinet meeting." Welles, Diary.

President writes Sec. Chase: "I have felt considerable anxiety concerning the Custom House at New York. . . . I am convinced that he [Hiram Barney] has ceased to be master of his position. . . . I propose sending Mr. Barney Minister to Portugal, as evidence of my continued confidence in him." J. F. Bailey, special agent of Treasury, assumes to be collector. Public interest will suffer in his hands. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, [12 February] 1864, CW, 7:181.



Browse Month

Lincoln interviews Gen. Judson Kilpatrick from Army of Potomac. Washington Star, 13 February 1864; Sedgwick to Lincoln, 11 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Atty. Gen. Bates calls on Lincoln to discuss presidential election. Bates, Diary.

President gets new stables to replace those destroyed by fire. Congress appropriates $12,000. Stat. L., XIII, 3.

President attends afternoon reception but is unwell. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 13 February 1864, CW, 7:182.

Mrs. Lincoln's Saturday afternoon reception draws large crowd, including Gen. Sickles and member of staff. Washington Star, 13 February 1864.



Browse Month

Lincoln calls at Treasury Dept. to discuss replacement for Hiram Barney as collector of customs at New York. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 15 February 1864, CW, 7:184.

Requests Gen. Sickles to make tour for observation and information from Cairo, Ill., to New Orleans and return by sea. Abraham Lincoln to Daniel E. Sickles, 15 February 1864, CW, 7:185.

Does not approve bill to guarantee republican form of government to states in rebellion. Albert G. Riddle, Recollections of War Times: Reminiscences of Men and Events in Washington, 1860-1865 (New York: Putnam, 1895), 298.

Mrs. Lincoln, accompanied by Robert and Harvard friends, attends evening tableaux at Willard's. Performance by amateurs of élite of Washington for benefit of Sanitary Commission. Washington Chronicle, 16 February 1864; Washington National Republican, 16 February 1864.

Confers with Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt on courtmartial cases. CW, 8:532.

Requests, through Nicolay, that James E. Murdoch read enclosed poem, "Am I For Peace? Yes!," at benefit for U.S. Sanitary Commission this evening. CW, 8:532.



Browse Month

"No matters of much moment at the Cabinet." Welles, Diary.

President forwards to House of Representatives documentation touching arrest of [J. R. Giddings] U.S. consul general to British North American Provinces. Abraham Lincoln to the House of Representatives, 16 February 1864, CW, 7:187-88.

Transmits to Congress information about claim of owners of French ship "La Manche." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 16 February 1864, CW, 7:188.

Receives copy of Gen. Blair's speech on confiscated property through Postmaster Gen. Blair. Blair to Lincoln, 16 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

President of Washington Lecture Association calls on Lincoln and invites him to attend lecture on "The Nation after the Ordeal of Battle." Invitation, 17 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln explains to William M. Fishback, of Little Rock, Ark., that Gen. Steele, commanding the military, must be master of situation leading to formation of state government; "but that it will probably be best for him to merely help the convention on it's own plan." Abraham Lincoln to William M. Fishback, 17 February 1864, CW, 7:189-90.

Instructs Steele to fix day for election; but it "is probably best that you merely assist the convention on their own plan." Abraham Lincoln to Frederick Steele, 17 February 1864, CW, 7:190-91.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President raises blockade on port of Brownsville, Tex. Proclamation Concerning Blockade, 18 February 1864, CW, 7:192-93; Washington Star, 19 February 1864.

Baltimore Constitutional Convention adopts resolutions endorsing Lincoln for reelection. Washington Star, 19 February 1864.

President interviews Gen. George R. Davis of Troy, N.Y., regarding "a case of peculiar hardship." Griswold to Lincoln, 18 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln writes to Massachusetts Governor John A. Andrew, who complained, "[F]reemen and refugees from slavery, desiring to pass northward . . . seeking to better their fortunes . . . are forcibly and against their will detained." Lincoln suspects that Andrew's overriding objective is "to raise colored troops." Lincoln responds, "If . . . it be really true that Massachusetts wishes to afford a permanent home . . . for . . . colored persons . . . I shall be only too glad to know it. . . . I would not for a moment hinder from going, any person who is free by the terms of the proclamation or any of the acts of Congress." John A. Andrew to Abraham Lincoln, 12 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to John A. Andrew, 18 February 1864, CW, 7:191.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President recognizes Eli B. Budd as consul of Costa Rica at New York. Washington Star, 22 February 1864.

"A fair, plump lady" from Dubuque, Iowa, who merely wants to see Lincoln, interrupts cabinet meeting. Welles, Diary.

In the afternoon, President Lincoln and his family host a "private reception" in the White House for some "celebrated little people." Lincoln's guests include Charles Nestel and his sister Eliza Nestel, of Ft. Wayne, Indiana. The siblings are members of an entertainment troupe that is performing at Washington, D. C.'s Odd Fellows' Hall. The Nestels are better known, respectively, by the stage names Commodore Foote and the Fairy Queen. A newspaper reports that a large number of the "elite...of the city" have been attending the "wonderful performances." Evening Star (Washington, D.C.), 20 February 1864, 2:5, 3:1; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 20 February 1864, 2d ed., 2:6.

President Lincoln and his family attend an evening performance by Edwin Booth as Sir Edward Mortimer in "The Iron Chest" and as Petruchio in "Katherine and Petruchio" at Grover's Theatre. Daily National Republican (Washington, D.C.), 19 February 1864, 3:4; 20 February 1864, 2:3.



Browse Month

President attends Mrs. Lincoln's regular Saturday afternoon reception. Band plays for small crowd. Washington Star, 20 February 1864; Daily National Republican (Washington,DC), 20 February 1864, 2d ed., 2:4; Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Promises to see J. F. Bailey, who is expected in Washington by first of next week. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 20 February 1864, CW, 7:195.



Browse Month

Lincoln receives endorsement of Republican National Committee by majority of four to one. Thomas Harry Williams, Lincoln and the Radicals (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1941), 311.

Approves act of Congress creating office of lieutenant general and nominates Gen. Grant for honor. Arnold, 518.

Discusses Missouri politics with Atty. Gen. Bates in afternoon. Bates, Diary.

At 7:30 P.M., with Mrs. Lincoln and Robert, takes part in opening of Patent Office Fair for benefit of Christian Commission and families of District volunteers. Following speech by L. E. Chittenden and poem by Commissioner French, Lincoln makes impromptu speech, which Mrs. Lincoln describes as "the worst speech I ever listened to in my life." Washington Star, 23 February 1864; Sidney Kramer, "Lincoln at the Fair," Abraham Lincoln Quarterly, 3 (September 1945):340-41; Remarks at Opening of Patent Office Fair, 22 February 1864, CW, 7:197-98.

Lincoln, presumably, drafts letter to Cong. Benjamin F. Loan (Mo.) for signature of Sec. Stanton : "The President's wish is that no objection shall be made to any paper respectfully expressing it's preference for the nomination of any candidate; but that the patronage of the government shall be given to none which engages in cultivating a sentiment to oppose the election of any when he shall have been fairly nominated by the regular Union National Convention." Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin F. Loan, 22 February 1864, CW, 7:197.

Transmits to Congress copy of correspondence regarding presentation of watch to master of American schooner "Highlander" by Lords of the Committee of Her Majesty's Privy Council for Trade. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 22 February 1864, CW, 7:198-99.

Telegraphs Gen. Steele: "Your conferrence [sic] with citizens [Arkansas] approved. Let the election be on the fourteenth of March, as they agreed." Abraham Lincoln to Frederick Steele, 22 February 1864, CW, 7:199.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

Lincoln promises to write Sec. Chase further about "paper issued by Senator Pomeroy," [printed circular opposing renomination of Lincoln and advocating nomination of Chase.] Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 23 February 1864, CW, 7:200-1; Official Records—Armies 573-75.

Receives information that Indianapolis, Ind., convention unanimously instructed delegates for Lincoln. Thompson to Usher, 23 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Interviews Hugh McCulloch, comptroller of currency, on money matters. McCulloch to Lincoln, 24 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Cabinet meets without Chase and two other members. Welles, Diary.

Judge Henniker of Pennsylvania calls on President with note from Cong. Stevens (Pa.). Stevens to Lincoln, 23 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President confers with William H. Schofield, who is interested in Baker University at Baldwin, Kans. Schofield to Lincoln, 24 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

"The reception at the Presidential Mansion last evening was undoubtedly the largest that has taken place this winter." Washington Star, 24 February 1864.

President Lincoln writes to young Willie Smith, whom Lincoln has learned from "Your friend, Leroy C. Driggs...[that] you are a very earnest friend of mine." Lincoln thanks Smith for his friendship, and he encourages the boy to continue to "take so lively an interest in what just now so deeply concerns us." Smith, Lincoln writes, is a member of the generation that will one day "take charge of this country when we older ones shall have gone." Abraham Lincoln to Willie Smith, 23 February 1864, CW, 7:202.



Browse Month

President meets with political delegation from New York, as arranged by Sen. Morgan (N.Y.). Morgan to Lincoln, 24 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Issues pass to Simon Cameron and friends to Fortress Monroe, Va., and return. Pass for Simon Cameron, 24 February 1864, CW, 7:203.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President interviews Joseph Merrifield, who has filed complaint against Gen. Butler. Merrifield to Lincoln, 25 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Former Cong. Casey (Ky.) consults with Lincoln about bringing cotton out of Red River area. Casey to Lincoln, 25 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President notifies Sec. Chase to arrange 7 P.M. White House interview for J. F. Bailey about New York customs organization. Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 25 February 1864, CW, 7:204.

President and Mrs. Lincoln visit Grover's Theatre for performance by Edwin Booth in the title role in John Howard Payne's "Brutus." Washington Chronicle, 26 February 1864; Daily National Intelligencer (Washington, DC), 25 February 1864, 3:6.

Lincoln telegraphs Gen. Steele: "General Sickles is not going to Arkansas. He probably will make a tour down the Mississippi, and home by the Gulf and ocean, but he will not meddle in your affairs." Abraham Lincoln to Frederick Steele, 25 February 1864, CW, 7:204-5.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

Lincoln issues an order concerning deserters. "The President directs that the sentences of all deserters, who have been condemned by Court Martial to death, and that have not been otherwise acted upon by him, be mitigated to imprisonment during the war, at the Dry Tortugas, Florida . . . The Commanding Generals, who have power to act on proceedings of Courts Martial in such cases, are authorized in special cases to restore to duty deserters under sentence, when in their judgment the service will be thereby benefited." Order Commuting Sentence of Deserters, 26 February 1864, CW, 7:208.

Interviews Col. John W. Shaffer, Gen. Butler's chief of staff, relative to public slander of Butler. Memorandum Concerning Benjamin F. Butler, 26 February 1864, CW, 7:207.

Cabinet meets, with three members present. Political affairs discussed. Welles, Diary.

President Lincoln occupies regular private box at Grover's Theatre to see Edwin Booth play two roles, Shylock in Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice" and the title role in Dumanois and Dennery's comedy "Don Caesar de Bazan." Washington Chronicle, 27 February 1864; Daily National Intelligencer (Washington, DC), 26 February 1864, 1:4; Daily National Republican (Washington, DC), 26 February 1864, 3:2.



Browse Month

Lincoln visits Capitol to see "Antrobus," a picture of Gen. Grant. Chicago Tribune, 28 February 1864.

White House reception "pretty well" attended by visitors and foreign dignitaries. National Intelligencer, 29 February 1864.

Lincoln replies to Sec. Stanton 's request for instructions in relation to report of special commission to revise the enrollment and quotas of the city and state of New York: "I think this report may, on full consideration, be shown to have much that is valuable in it, . . . and that it be especially considered whether it's suggestions can be conformed to without an alteration of the law." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 27 February 1864, CW, 7:210-11.



Browse Month

President receives report that in joint caucus Union members of Ohio Legislature voted unanimously for his renomination. Day to Dennison, 27 February 1864, Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Telegraphs Adjt. Gen. Thomas at Louisville, Ky.: "I wish you would go to the Mississippi river at once, and take hold of, and be master in, the contraband and leasing business." Abraham Lincoln to Lorenzo Thomas, 28 February 1864, CW, 7:212.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President sends autograph copy of Gettysburg Address to George Bancroft for Baltimore Sanitary Fair. Abraham Lincoln to George Bancroft, 29 February 1864, CW, 7:212.

President Lincoln responds to a recent letter from the Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase, who wrote to Lincoln in light of the publication of the "Pomeroy Circular." Senator Samuel Pomeroy, of Kansas, cast doubts on Lincoln's chances for re-election and suggested that Chase would make a better Republican candidate. Lincoln writes that although he has "not yet read" the circular, he "was not shocked, or surprised" to learn of its existence. Lincoln agrees that neither man should be "justly held responsible for what our respective friends may do without our instigation or countenance." Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 29 February 1864, CW, 7:212-13.

[Assoc. Justice David Davis says of Chase's aspirations, "Mr. Lincoln must be 'obstinately pacific.'" Davis to Weed, 14 March 1864, Thurlow Weed Papers, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY.]

Interviews Cong. Rufus P. Spalding (Ohio) and former Cong. Riddle (Ohio), consul at Matanzas, Cuba, representatives of Chase hoping to learn if President was connected with Postmaster Gen. Blair's speech attacking Chase. Albert G. Riddle, Recollections of War Times: Reminiscences of Men and Events in Washington, 1860-1865 (New York: Putnam, 1895), 270-77.

Transmits to House of Representatives report from secretary of war relative to the reenlistment of "Veteran Volunteers." Abraham Lincoln to the House of Representatives, 29 February 1864, CW, 7:214.

Communicates to Senate articles of agreement concluded with Swan Creek, Black River Chippewas, and the Munsees or Christian Indians in Kansas. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [29] February 1864, CW, 7:215.