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29 entries found


Browse Month

President confers with Sec. Stanton about enforcement of Gen. Burnside's Order No. 38 against seditious newspapers in Indiana. Harper, Press, 261.

Consults Sen. Sumner (Mass.) again on proposal to raise Negro troops. Abraham Lincoln to Charles Sumner, 1 June 1863, CW, 6:242-44.

Informs George F. Kelly, agent for California settlers having complaints against action of District Court of California involving land claims, that courts must decide land titles. Abraham Lincoln to William T. Otto, 1 June 1863, CW, 6:242.

Receives from Sec. Welles list of applicants for appointment to Naval Academy. Welles, Diary.

Directs Col. William H. Ludlow, agent for exchange of prisoners at Fortress Monroe, Va., to ascertain why A. D. Richardson and Junius Browne, correspondents of New York "Tribune," are detained at Richmond, and to "get them off if you can." Abraham Lincoln to William H. Ludlow, 1 June 1863, CW, 6:241.



Browse Month

President replies to resolutions in support of administration adopted by General Assembly of Presbyterian Church. Reply to Members of the Presbyterian General Assembly, 2 June 1863, CW, 6:244-45; Washington Star, 2 June 1863.

Interviews Gen. John F. Reynolds about command of Army of Potomac. Edward J. Nichols, Toward Gettysburg: A Biography of General John F. Reynolds (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1958), 220.

Cabinet meets, discusses Vicksburg, Miss., campaign, and "confidence is expressed in Grant, but it seems that not enough was doing." Welles, Diary.

Lincoln telegraphs Grant at Vicksburg: "Are you in communication with Gen. Banks? Is he coming towards you, or going further off? Is there, or has there been any thing to hinder his coming directly to you by water from Alexandria?" Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 2 June 1863, CW, 6:244.



Browse Month

A. W. Thompson submits to President plan for organizing immigrants and Negroes into military units and employing them eight hours a day building railroads. Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 3 June 1863, CW, 6:246.



Browse Month

President receives complaints from Illinois political leaders against Gen. Burnside's Order No. 38 and revokes suspension of Chicago "Times" circulation. Harper, Press, 261; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 4 June 1863, CW, 6:248.

President, accompanied by Mrs. Lincoln and party, attends recitation from Shakespeare at private residence near Chain Bridge. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Orders Gen. Hooker to suspend execution of sentences in cases of Enos Daily, Philip Margraff, and Carlos Harrington of 146th New York Volunteers. Situation seems to be that recruits enlisting for six months are required to serve three years. "It is notorious among New-Yorkers that a regular system of deceit was practiced by recruiting officers." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 4 June 1863, CW, 6:248.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

Lincoln discusses with Gen. Halleck telegram from Gen. Hooker concerning disposition of troops in opposition to Gen. R. E. Lee. U.S. Congress, Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, 3 vols., 38th Cong., 2d sess. (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1865), I, 249.

President Lincoln writes to Commander of the Army of the Potomac General Joseph Hooker, and offers a strategy to outmaneuver Confederate General Robert E. Lee: "In case you find Lee coming to the North of the Rappahannock [River], I would by no means cross to the South of it. . . . In one word, I would not take any risk of being entangled upon the river, like an ox jumped half over a fence, and liable to be torn by dogs, front and rear, without a fair chance to gore one way or kick the other." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 5 June 1863, CW, 6:249-51.

Reads paper prepared in reply to Cong. "Erastus Corning [N.Y.] & Others." Welles, Diary.

Interviews Cong. Fernando Wood (N.Y.). N.Y. Herald, 6 June 1863.

Receives May salary warrant for $2,022.34. [Irwin deposits $350 in Springfield Marine Bank, rent from L. A. Tilton. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182, 165.]



Browse Month

Lincoln sends anonymous letter to editor of Washington "Chronicle" to call attention to wrong information in article on Chicago "Times." Anonymous Letter to the Editor of the Washington Chronicle, 6 June 1863, CW, 6:251-52.

Mrs. Lincoln sends White House flowers to Mrs. Fox. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln informs Gen. Dix at Fortress Monroe, Va., of conditions at Vicksburg, Miss. While dispatches "show the siege progressing, they do not show any general fighting, since the 21st. and 22nd. We have nothing from Port-Hudson later than the 29th. when things looked reasonably well for us." Abraham Lincoln to John A. Dix, 6 June 1863, CW, 6:252.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President instructs Sec. Welles to decide question of weekly performances of Marine band at White House. Welles, Diary.

Sec. Chase reads to Lincoln letter from Benjamin H. Brewster, prominent Philadelphia lawyer, on Pennsylvania political situation. Chase to Brewster, 9 June 1863, Simon Cameron Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President accompanies Mrs. Lincoln and Tad to 3 P.M. train for Philadelphia. Washington Star, 9 June 1863.

President Lincoln writes to Major General Samuel R. Curtis following Lincoln's removal of Curtis as commander of the Department of the Missouri. Curtis repeatedly clashed with Missouri Governor Hamilton R. Gamble. Lincoln writes, "It became almost a matter of personal self-defence to somehow break up the state of things in Missouri. I did not mean to cast any censure upon you, nor to indorse any of the charges made against you by others. With me the presumption is still in your favor that you are honest, capable, faithful, and patriotic." Abraham Lincoln to Samuel R. Curtis, 8 June 1863, CW, 6:253-54.

Sends two dispatches to Gen. Dix: "We have despatches from Vicksburg of the 3rd. Siege progressing. No general fighting recently. All well." And: "The substance of the news sent of fight at Port-Hudson on the 27th. we have had here three or four days. . . . We knew that Gen. Sherman was wounded. . . . We still have nothing of that Richmond newspaper story of [Gen. Edmund] Kirby Smith [(CSA)] crossing & of Banks losing an arm." Abraham Lincoln to John A. Dix, 8 June 1863, CW, 6:254; Abraham Lincoln to John A. Dix, 8 June 1863, CW, 6:254.



Browse Month

President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in Philadelphia: "Think you better put 'Tad's' pistol away. I had an ugly dream about him." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 9 June 1863, CW, 6:256.



Browse Month

President forgets 12 M. appointment with Mr. Molina arranged by Sec. Seward [probably Luis Molina, minister from Nicaragua]. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 10 June 1863, CW, 6:258.

Accompanied by Sec. Stanton , Gen. Heintzelman, and staff, visits Fort Lyon, Va. Explosion there yesterday did no serious damage. Washington Star, 11 June 1863.

Replies to dispatch of Gen. Hooker: "If left to me, I would not go South of the Rappahannock, upon Lee's moving North of it. . . . I think Lee's Army, and not Richmond, is your true objective point." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 10 June 1863, CW, 6:257-58.



Browse Month

President congratulates Jesus Jimenez on election to presidency of Republic of Costa Rica. Abraham Lincoln to Jesus Jimenez, 11 June 1863, CW, 6:259-60.

Telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in Philadelphia: "Your three despatches received. I am very well; and am glad to know that you & 'Tad' are so." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 11 June 1863, CW, 6:260.

Confers with Gen. Halleck on movement of troops under Gen. Hooker. U.S. Congress, Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, 3 vols., 38th Cong., 2d sess. (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1865), I, 255.



Browse Month

President replies to resolutions of public meeting held at Albany, N.Y., in letter to "Hon. Erastus Corning & Others." Differences exist in construing war powers of President under Constitution. Abraham Lincoln to Erastus Corning and Others, [12 June] 1863, CW, 6:260-69.

Notifies Gen. Hooker of plan to join him at 5 P.M. tomorrow for trial of incendiary shells. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 12 June 1863, CW, 6:270.

Visits Gen. Meigs' office to discuss Army of Potomac. Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Spends part of afternoon at War Dept. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

President thanks Leopold I, King of the Belgians, for acting as arbiter in U.S.S. "Macedonian" case. Abraham Lincoln to Leopold, 13 June 1863, CW, 6:271-72.

At 1 P.M. President and Gen. Meigs board tug for trip to Army of Potomac. Gen. Hooker telegraphs to postpone visit. Tug turns back at Alexandria, Va., and reaches Washington at 3:30 P.M. Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 13 June 1863, CW, 6:271.

[Irwin deposits $754.60 in Springfield Marine Bank, payment of Cline note and interest. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165.]

Lincoln directs Sec. Welles: "Please allow the bearer, Mr. [Azel S.] Lyman, to take his new cannon into the Navy-Yard where I wish to see it fired next week." Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 13 June 1863, CW, 6:272.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

At 5:50 p.m., President Lincoln telegraphs commander of the Army of the Potomac Major General Joseph Hooker regarding defensive strategies on Virginia battlefields. Lincoln writes, "So far as we can make out here, the enemy have [General Robert] Milroy surrounded at Winchester, and [General Robert] Tyler at Martinsburg. . . . If the head of Lee's army is at Martinsburg and the tail of it on the Plank road between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, the animal must be very slim somewhere. Could you not break him?" Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 14 June 1863, CW, 6:273.

Meeting in evening at War Dept. consists of President, Secs. Stanton and Welles, and Gen. Halleck. Lincoln is "trying to find out what Lee's army is up to." Welles, Diary; Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President authorizes secretary of treasury to "co-operate by the revenue cutters under your direction with the navy in arresting rebel depredations on American commerce and transportation and in capturing rebels engaged therein." Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 14 June 1863, CW, 6:272-73.

Replies to Hooker's dispatch inquiring if Winchester, Va., is surrounded: "I really fear—almost believe, it is. No communication has been had with it during the day, either at Martinsburg, or Harper's Ferry. . . . It is quite certain that a considerable force of the enemy is thereabout; and I fear it is an overwhelming one, compared with [Gen. Robert H.], Milroy[']s." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 14 June 1863, CW, 6:273-74.



Browse Month

President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in Philadelphia: "Tolerably well. Have not rode out much yet, but have at last got new tires on the carriage wheels, & perhaps, shall ride out soon." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 15 June 1863, CW, 6:277.

Issues proclamation calling for 100,000 militia. Proclamation Calling for 100,000 Militia, 15 June 1863, CW, 6:277-78; Washington Star, 15 June 1863.

Interviews E. L. Baker about charges against N. W. Edwards, commissary, and William H. Bailhache, quartermaster at Springfield, Ill., of having used their positions to amass personal fortunes. Abraham Lincoln to Edward L. Baker, 15 June 1863, CW, 6:275-76.

Informs Gen. Hooker at Fairfax Station, Va.: "The facts are now known here that Winchester and Martinsburg were both besieged yesterday; the troops from Martinsburg have got into Harper's Ferry without loss; those from Winchester, are also in, having lost, in killed, wounded and missing, about one third of their number." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 15 June 1863, CW, 6:276-77.

Communicates with Gen. Daniel Tyler at Harper's Ferry, W. Va.: "It would be useful, if we could tell Hooker, about what number of the enemy is about Winchester and all North of it—also what troops they are. I will be obliged, if you will ascertain as nearly as you can, and inform me." Abraham Lincoln to Daniel Tyler, 15 June 1863, CW, 6:278.



Browse Month

President interviews district attorney in assault and battery case against John Knowles. Abraham Lincoln to Edward Bates, 16 June 1863, CW, 6:278-79.

Telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in Philadelphia: "It is a matter of choice with yourself whether you come home. There is no reason why you should not, that did not exist when you went away. As bearing on the question of your coming home, I do not think the raid in Pennsylvania amounts to anything at all." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 16 June 1863, CW, 6:283.

Interviews Gen. Cadwalader regarding assignment to command troops at Philadelphia for present emergency. Abraham Lincoln to Horace Binney, Jr., 16 June 1863, CW, 6:279.

At cabinet meeting Sec. Chase suggests that an attempt be made to capture Richmond, but Lincoln blocks idea. Welles, Diary.

President and Sec. Stanton at War Dept. in evening. Sec. Welles drops in and finds them jubilant over report that no Confederates have reached Carlisle, Pa. Welles, Diary, 17 June 1863.

Telegraphs Gen. Hooker: "Your idea to send your cavalry to this side of the river may be right—probably is; still, it pains me a little that it looks like defensive merely, and seems to abandon the fair chance now presented of breaking the enemy's long and necessarily slim line, stretched now from the Rappahannock to Pennsylvania." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 16 June 1863, CW, 6:280-81.

Sends letter to Hooker by hand of Capt. Ulric Dahlgren regarding lack of confidence Gen. Halleck displays toward Hooker. "You state the case much too strongly. . . . I believe Halleck is dissatisfied with you to this extent only, that he knows that you write and telegraph ('report' as he calls it) to me. . . . I need and must have the professional skill of both, and yet these suspicions tend to deprive me of both. . . . Now, all I ask is that you will be in such mood that we can get into our action the best cordial judgment of yourself and General Halleck, with my poor mite added, if indeed he and you shall think it entitled to any consideration at all." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 16 June 1863, CW, 6:281-82.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President abstains from recommending Israel D. Andrews, former agent of U.S., for public employment. Memorandum about Israel D. Andrews, 17 June 1863, CW, 6:284-85.

President Lincoln receives foreign minister Henry Segur, of San Salvador. Segur expresses "sympathy felt by the President of Salvador for the cause of the American Union." A newspaper reports, "President Lincoln replied by saying he hoped the Minister's residence here would be agreeable, and his mission satisfactory, and said he was not uninformed of the devotion of Salvador to the principles of republicanism and the interests of civilization." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 18 June 1863, 2:4-5.

Replies to Gen. Hooker: "Mr. Eckert, Superintendent in the Telegraph Office, assures me that he has sent, and will send you everything, that comes to the office." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 17 June 1863, CW, 6:284.



Browse Month

President thanks Gen. A. Dingman, 15th Battalion Volunteers, Canada, for offer of battalion to defend Washington. Abraham Lincoln to A. Dingman, 18 June 1863, CW, 6:285.

Mitigates sentence of dismissal in case of Surg. Alfred Wynkoop to severe reprimand for indiscretion in communicating information re troop movements. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 18 June 1863, CW, 6:285-86.

Interviews Mr. Buckner who asks to be discharged from suit in scire facias. Abraham Lincoln to Joshua Tevis, 18 June 1863, CW, 6:286-87.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President replies to committee appointed by planters of state of Louisiana regarding reorganization of state government. Abraham Lincoln to E. E. Malhiot, Bradish Johnson, and Thomas Cottman, 19 June 1863, CW, 6:287-89.

President Lincoln meets with Boston Mayor Frederick W. Lincoln, who represents a "commission" now in Washington "to consult the President with reference to the defenses of Boston." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 19 June 1863, 2:4.

Receives news that Rear Adm. Foote, suffering from incurable disease, is in critical condition. Washington Star, 19 June 1863.

Instructs John Nicolay to inform Chicago "Tribune" that President will be glad to receive copies "so long as in your kindness you may please to send it." Nicolay to "Tribune" Company, 19 June 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

President receives inquiry from Gen. Schofield asking whether government will sustain action of Missouri Constitutional Convention regarding gradual emancipation. Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 21 June 1863, CW, 6:289.



Browse Month

Lincoln prepares answer to Gen. Schofield's inquiry of yesterday. Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 21 June 1863, CW, 6:289.

Forwards report from Leesburg, Va., telegraph operator to Gen. Hooker: "Firing commenced about 7 this morning in direction from here of Aldie's Gap and Middleburg; has continued all day, . . . apparently now about White Plains." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 21 June 1863, CW, 6:289.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President allots Assoc. Justice Stephen J. Field to 10th circuit of U.S. Circuit Court for Districts of California and Oregon. Assignment of Stephen J. Field, 22 June 1863, CW, 6:290.

Appoints Asst. Atty. Gen. Titian J. Coffey attorney general ad interim, in absence of Edward Bates. Bates, Diary, 23 June 1863.

Begins summer residence at Soldiers' Home. Washington Star, 22 June 1863; DNA—RG 217, General Accounting Office, 147-321.

Sends another Leesburg, Va., report to Gen. Hooker: "'I heard very little firing this a.m. about daylight, but it seems to have stopped now. It was in about the same direction as yesterday, but farther off.' " Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 22 June 1863, CW, 6:290.

President Lincoln writes to commander of the Department of the Missouri General John M. Schofield, who seeks clarification regarding the military's role as the state institutes an emancipation policy. Lincoln writes, "I have very earnestly urged the slave-states to adopt emancipation; and it ought to be, and is an object with me not to overthrow, or thwart what any of them may in good faith do, to that end. You are therefore authorized to act in the spirit of this letter, in conjunction with what may appear to be the military necessities of your Department." John M. Schofield to Abraham Lincoln, 20 June 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 22 June 1863, CW, 6:291.



Browse Month

At request of Cong. Kelley (Pa.) President interviews Pvt. Wilton M. Herpert [Milton L. Hupert?] and sends him to Sec. Stanton . Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 23 June 1863, CW, 6:292.

Lincoln at cabinet meeting "sad and careworn." "Nothing of special interest was submitted." Welles, Diary.

President inquires of Maj. Stewart Van Vliet, quartermaster at New York: "Have you any idea what the news is, in the despatches of Gen. Banks to Gen. Halleck?" Abraham Lincoln to Stewart Van Vliet, 23 June 1863, CW, 6:292.



Browse Month

Sec. Seward introduces Lt. Theron B. Luckey, recently discharged from 143d New York Infantry. President sends him to Sec. Stanton . Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 24 June 1863, CW, 6:294.

Telegraphs Gen. Darius N. Couch at Harrisburg, Pa.: "Have you any reports of the enemy moving into Pennsylvania? and if any, what?" Abraham Lincoln to Darius N. Couch, 24 June 1863, CW, 6:293.



Browse Month

Delegation from Ohio State Democratic Convention visits President to present set of resolutions relating to civil liberties. Submits written resolutions following day. Abraham Lincoln to Matthew Birchard and Others, 29 June 1863, CW, 6:300-6.

Writes check to "Rev. Dr. [Phineas D.] Gurley (for church)" for $25.00. CW, 8:517.



Browse Month

Lincoln commutes six death sentences pending in army. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:296; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:296; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:296; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:296-97; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:297; Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 June 1863, CW, 6:297.

"The President in a single remark today betrayed doubts of Hooker, to whom he is quite partial." Welles, Diary.

About 9 P.M. Col. Daniel T. Van Buren and Col. Silas W. Burt visit President at Soldiers' Home to tell him that Gov. Seymour (N.Y.) will stand behind him. Rufus R. Wilson, ed., Lincoln Among His Friends: A Sheaf of Intimate Memories (Caldwell, ID: Caxton Printers, 1942), 330.



Browse Month

President at conference in War Dept. agrees to relieve Gen. Hooker of command of Army of Potomac and replace him with Gen. George G. Meade. Randall, Lincoln, 2:274.

Telegraphs Hooker: "It did not come from the newspapers, nor did I believe it, but I wished to be entirely sure it was a falsehood." [This probably refers to rumor that Hooker was AWOL from army.] Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 27 June 1863, CW, 6:297-98.



Browse Month

At 10 A.M. cabinet meeting President reads reply to resolutions of Ohio Democratic State Convention regarding former Cong. Vallandigham (Ohio). Also reads Gen. Hooker's telegram offering to resign as commander of Army of Potomac. Sec. Welles believes that choice of Gen. Meade to succeed Hooker was made before meeting. Welles, Diary.

"Gen. Hooker has asked to be relieved and Gen. Meade succeeds him." Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln telegraphs Gen. Couch at Harrisburg, Pa.: "What news now? What are the enemy firing at four miles from your works?" Abraham Lincoln to Darius N. Couch, 28 June 1863, CW, 6:299.



Browse Month

President answers propositions set forth in resolutions of Ohio Democratic State Convention, presented on June 26, 1863 by delegation headed by Matthew Birchard. Abraham Lincoln to Matthew Birchard and Others, 29 June 1863, CW, 6:300-6.

Refuses to permit former Cong. William Kellogg (Ill.) or his agent to trade in cotton and other products at Helena, Ark. Abraham Lincoln to William Kellogg, 29 June 1863, CW, 6:307.

Approves arrest of Gen. Milroy for loss of division at Winchester, Va. Abraham Lincoln to Robert H. Milroy, 29 June 1863, CW, 6:308-9.

President and Sec. Stanton agree to plan of Asst. Sec. Fox for Rear Adm. Foote and task force commanded by Gen. Dix to attempt capture of Richmond. Gen. Halleck vetoes plan. Gustavus V. Fox, Confidential Correspondence of Gustavus Vasa Fox, 2 vols. (New York: n.p., 1918), 2:259; Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President in conference with Sec. Stanton and Gen. Halleck; misses cabinet meeting. Welles, Diary.

Cong. Kelley (Pa.) calls and requests that Gen. McClellan not be placed in command in Pennsylvania. Kelley to Lincoln, 30 June 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Gen. Butler at White House for interview with President. N.Y. Herald, 1 July 1863.

President receives invitation to use residence of J. C. G. Kennedy, 380 H St., at any time. Kennedy to Lincoln, 30 June 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Telegraphs Gen. Couch at 3:25 P.M.: "I judge by absence of news that the enemy is not crossing, or pressing up to the Susquehannah. Please tell me what you know of his movements." Abraham Lincoln to Darius N. Couch, 30 June 1863, CW, 6:310.

President Lincoln replies to General David Hunter, who is unhappy about being "remov[ed] from command of the Dept. of the South." Hunter wants permission to release "official . . . records as may be necessary to set me right in the eyes of my friends and in the justice of history." Lincoln writes, "I assure you . . . the recent change of commanders . . . was made for no reasons which convey any imputation upon your known energy, efficiency and patriotism. . . . I cannot, by giving my consent to a publication of whose details I know nothing, assume the responsibility of whatever you may write. In this matter your own sense of military propriety must be your guide, and the regulations of the service your rule of conduct." David Hunter to Abraham Lincoln, 25 June 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to David Hunter, 30 June 1863, CW, 6:310-11.

Answers A. K. McClure, who asserts that people are clamoring for Gen. McClellan to be placed in command in Pennsylvania: "Do we gain anything by opening one leak to stop another? Do we gain any thing by quieting one clamor, merely to open another, and probably a larger one?" Abraham Lincoln to Alexander K. McClure, 30 June 1863, CW, 6:311.

Acknowledges letter of Gov. Joel Parker (N.J.), who writes that people of New Jersey want McClellan at head of Army of Potomac: "I really think the attitude of the enemies' army in Pennsylvania, presents us the best opportunity we have had since the war began. I think you will not see the foe in New-Jersey. I beg you to be assured that no one out of my position can know so well as if he were in it, the difficulties and involvements of replacing Gen. McClellan in command." Abraham Lincoln to Joel Parker, 30 June 1863, CW, 6:311-12.