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31 entries found


Browse Month

"President is steadily recovering from his indisposition and it is not doubted that he will in a day or two be equal to the active resumption of his arduous duties." Washington Star, 1 December 1863.

Recognizes J. B. Gossler as vice consul of Austria at Boston. Washington Chronicle, 5 December 1863.



Browse Month

Lincoln declines invitation to attend meeting at Cooper Institute to promote raising of volunteers. Abraham Lincoln to George Opdyke and Others, 2 December 1863, CW, 7:32; Washington Chronicle, 6 December 1863.

Baltimore "American" places at head of its columns name of Lincoln as candidate for President in 1864. Washington Star, 2 December 1863.



Browse Month

President ill. "We are glad to say that he is in a fair way for speedy recovery." Washington Star, 3 December 1863.

[Mrs. Lincoln arrives Metropolitan Hotel, New York, in evening. Helm, Mary, 234.]



Browse Month

9:30 A.M. President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in New York: "All going well." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, 4 December 1863, CW, 7:34.

Congs. Brutus J. Clay (Ky.) and Green Clay Smith (Ky.) present to President petition for release of Clifton F. Estill, prisoner of war at Camp Douglas, Ill., whose mother was active Union lady in Fayette County. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 4 December 1863, CW, 7:34.

President, still confined to room, is working on Annual Message to Congress. N.Y. Herald, 5 December 1863.



Browse Month

10 A.M. President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln at Metropolitan Hotel, New York: "All doing well." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 5 December 1863, CW, 7:34.

Is toasted at banquet by city authorities to commemorate turning of Potomac water into aqueduct. Washington Chronicle, 7 December 1863.

Receives November salary warrant for $2,022.34. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.



Browse Month

President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in New York: "All doing well." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 6 December 1863, CW, 7:35.

Sends for Cong. Colfax (Ind.), nominated for Speaker of House by acclamation. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Confers with Colfax about plans of clerk of House of Representatives to give control of House to Peace Party by excluding members with old certificates. Memorandum, 6 December 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

10:20 A.M. President telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in New York: "All doing well. Tad confidently expects you to-night. When will you come?" Mrs. Lincoln replies: "Will leave here positively at 8 a.m. Tuesday morning. Have carriage waiting at depot in Washington at 6 p.m. Did Tad receive his book. Please answer." 7 P.M. President telegraphs reply: "Tad has received his book. The carriage shall be ready at 6 P.M. tomorrow." Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 7 December 1863, CW, 7:35; Abraham Lincoln to Mary Lincoln, 7 December 1863, CW, 7:35.

Issues press release on Union success in Tennessee and recommends that all loyal people assemble informally in churches and render homage to God. Washington Chronicle, 8 December 1863; Announcement of Union Success in Tennessee, 7 December 1863, CW, 7:35.

Refers to military situation at Knoxville and comments: "Now if this Army of the Potomac was any good . . . if the Army had any legs, they could move 30,000 men down to Lynchburg and catch Longstreet. Can anybody doubt, if Grant were here in command that he would catch him?" Memorandum, 7 December 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

President receives joint committee from 38th Congress and announces that Annual Message will be communicated to Congress tomorrow at 12:30 P.M. Senate Journal, 8.

Annual report describes past year as one of health, sufficient harvests, improved conditions in national affairs, and peace with foreign powers. Treaties with Great Britain have suppressed African slave trade and adjusted possessory claims in Washington Territory. Negotiations with Spain, Chile, Peru, Nicaragua, and Colombia have been satisfactory. Foreigners within lines of insurgents are classed as belligerents, and naturalized persons must serve in military. Condition of organized territories is generally satisfactory. Under sharp discipline of civil war, Nation is beginning a new life. Operations of Treasury during last year have been successfully conducted. Pay of Army and Navy promptly met. People have borne burdens cheerfully. Blockade is increasing in efficiency; but illicit trade is not entirely suppressed. Production of war vessels has created new form of naval power. Post office may become self-supporting in few years. In Dept. of Interior public lands are being taken up, legislation is needed for Indian system, consideration should be given to enlarging water connections between Mississippi River and northeastern seaboard. When Congress assembled year ago, tone of public feeling and opinion at home and abroad was not satisfactory. With emancipation and employment of Negro troops there is new reckoning. Crisis which threatened to divide friends of Union is past. Looking to resumption of national authority within states, proclamation of amnesty and reconstruction is thought fit. State governments set up under prescribed mode will be recognized. War power is still main reliance. Chief care must be directed to Army and Navy. Annual Message to Congress, 8 December 1863, CW, 7:36-53.

President issues Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction whereby: 1. Persons in rebellion, with certain exceptions, who take oath to support Constitution are granted full pardon. 2. Exceptions are civil, diplomatic, and specified defense agents of Confederate government, and persons guilty of mistreating Negro prisoners of war. 3. Governments reestablished as prescribed in rebellious states shall be recognized as free governments of such states. 4. President will not object to provisions adopted by reestablished governments in relation to freed people. 5. Proclamation has no reference to states wherein loyal state governments have been maintained. 6. Congress shall have sole right of admitting members representing reestablished governments. Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction, 8 December 1863, CW, 7:53-56.

[This proclamation is authority for pardons granted by Lincoln throughout remainder of war.] Lincoln sends "my profoundest gratitude" to Gen. Grant and his command for fighting at Chattanooga and Knoxville. Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 8 December 1863, CW, 7:53. Deposits in Riggs Bank November salary warrant for $2,022.34. Pratt, Personal Finances, 183.

Nominates "Commander D. D. Porter, to be a Rear Admiral in Navy, on the Active List, from the 4th. July 1863." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 8 December 1863, CW, 7:56-57.

Recommends to Congress that "Capt. John Rodgers, U.S. Navy, receive vote of thanks" for skill and gallantry exhibited in engagement with rebel steamer "Fingal," alias "Atlanta." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 8 December 1863, CW, 7:57.



Browse Month

"The President's Message will be read this morning in both Houses of Congress, at half-past twelve o'clock." Washington Chronicle, 9 December 1863.

Many call at White House to congratulate President on message to Congress. Lincoln says that only person who objected to message was Sec. Chase. Hay, Letters and Diary.



Browse Month

Lincoln telegraphs Gov. Johnson (Tenn.) at 10:30 A.M.: "I still desire very much to see you can you not come" Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 10 December 1863, CW, 7:59.

Transmits to both Houses of Congress report and documents relating to "An Act to regulate the diplomatic and consular systems of the United States." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 10 December 1863, CW, 7:59.

Lincoln's health much improved; he sees visitors with special business. Chicago Tribune, 11 December 1863.

Interviews Cong. Arnold (Ill.) in evening. Hay, Letters and Diary.



Browse Month

"President Lincoln, we are happy to state, is now convalescent, and yesterday passed several hours in the transaction of official business." Washington Chronicle, 11 December 1863.

Telegraphs Gen. Schofield: "Please come to see me at once." Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 11 December 1863, CW, 7:61.

Pardons Edward W. Gantt, of Arkansas, guilty of treason incurred by serving as brigadier general in Confederate army. Washington Star, 11 December 1863; Jonathan T. Dorris, Pardon and Amnesty under Lincoln and Johnson: The Restoration of the Confederates to their Rights and Privileges, 1861-1898 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1953), 36.



Browse Month

Sen. Alexander Ramsey (Minn.) and Capt. Thomas A. P. Champlin interview President regarding courtmartial of Champlin. Ramsey to Lincoln, 15 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President sees no callers today because of illness. Browning, Diary.

Notifies Sec. Stanton that resignation of Gen. Palmer was not accepted. "I do not want him to resign, unless there be some reason not yet known to me." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 12 December 1863, CW, 7:61.



Browse Month

Lincoln confides in O. H. Browning that Emily Todd Helm, half-sister to Mrs. Lincoln, is at White House and fact should not be made public. Browning, Diary.

Sends message to Gen. Schofield: "On the 11th. I telegraphed, asking you to come here and see me. Did you receive the despatch?" Abraham Lincoln to John M. Schofield, 13 December 1863, CW, 7:62.

Discusses Missouri affairs and seems inclined to remove Schofield and put Gen. Resecrans in his place. Hay, Letters and Diary.

In evening Gens. Sickles and Wadsworth call on President, who has special guest, J. H. Hackett. Hay, Letters and Diary.



Browse Month

Lincoln interviews former Cong. Samuel L. Casey (Ky.) and orders safe-conduct for him from Cairo, Ill. to Red River and return with any cargoes he may bring. Agreement Signed by Samuel L. Casey, 14 December 1863, CW, 7:62-63.

Restores all rights of person and property to Emily Todd Helm who takes oath of December 8, 1863. Amnesty to Emily T. Helm, 14 December 1863, CW, 7:63-64.

Declines to see Cong. Fernando Wood (N.Y.), who seeks amnesty for Northern sympathizers with rebellion. Memorandum, 15 December 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President and family visit Ford's Theatre to see James H. Hackett play Falstaff in "Henry IV." Washington Chronicle, 15 December 1863.



Browse Month

"The President this morning was able to be in his office and attend to business." Washington Star, 15 December 1863.

Interviews Dr. Thomas Cottman of Louisiana relative to reestablishment of state government. Abraham Lincoln to Thomas Cottman, 15 December 1863, CW, 7:66-67.

Lays before Senate six Indian treaties. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:68; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:68; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:69; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:69; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:69-70; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [15] December 1863, CW, 7:70.

Attends cabinet meeting. Welles, Diary.

Capt. Champlin returns to ask Lincoln to discharge penalty adjudged against him by courtmartial. Ramsey to Lincoln, 15 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln explains to Judge Ogden Hoffman, of San Francisco, that "oath in the proclamation of Dec. 8th is intended for those who may voluntarily take it, and not for those who may be constrained to take it, in order to escape actual imprisonment." Abraham Lincoln to Ogden Hoffman, 15 December 1863, CW, 7:67-68.

Attends Ford's Theatre, accompanied by John Nicolay, John Hay, and Leonard Swett, to see James H. Hackett play Falstaff in "Henry IV." Criticizes Hackett's reading of a passage. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Writes Mother Mary Gonzaga, Superior, Academy of Visitation, Keokuk, Iowa: "The President has no authority as to whether you may raffle for the benevolent object you mention. If there is no objection in the Iowa laws, there is none here." Abraham Lincoln to Mother Mary Gonzaga, 15 December 1863, CW, 7:67.

Transmits to Senate "certain information touching persons in the service of this Government." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 15 December 1863, CW, 7:70.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

As public mark of esteem felt by U.S. for high character and steady friendship of John Bright, President pardons Alfred Rubery, youthful British subject sentenced to 10 years' imprisonment and to pay fine of $10,000 for aiding Confederacy. Pardon of Alfred Rubery, [16 December 1863?], CW, 7:71-72.

Confers for an hour with Cong. Fernando Wood (N.Y.), about amnesty for Northern sympathizers with rebellion. President's Amnesty Proclamation of December 8, 1863 is not specific with respect to Northern sympathizers. Chicago Tribune, 18 December 1863.

Lincoln interviews C. C. Fulton, introduced by Postmaster Gen. Blair. Blair to Lincoln, 16 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Issues proclamation concerning discriminating duties of tonnage and imposts. Proclamation Concerning Discriminating Duties, 16 December 1863, CW, 7:72-73.

Lincoln writes to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton and requests safe passage for the widow and relatives of one-time Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur. Former judge advocate John Lee seeks Lincoln's help in returning Elizabeth Upshur, her sister, and grandson to Washington, D. C. Lee explains, "Before the war," the trio had been summering in the Virginia mountains, "and did not come back." Lee vouches, "They are...excellent and innocent people." Lincoln writes, "I am so repeatedly applied to for leave to Mrs. Upshur...that I shall be obliged if you will permit it." John F. Lee to Montgomery Blair, 22 November 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 16 December 1863, CW, 7:74.



Browse Month

Baltimore delegation of public men calls on President and asks that J. L. Ridgely be reinstated as collector of internal revenue. Memorandum: Removal of James L. Ridgely, 17 December 1863, CW, 7:75-76.

President transmits to Senate convention between U.S. and Great Britain relative to claims of Hudson's Bay and Puget's Sound Agricultural Companies. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 17 December 1863, CW, 7:76.

Submits to Congress proposition for establishing "Bureau of Emancipation" as proposed by Freedmen's Aid Societies. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 17 December 1863, CW, 7:76-77.

Clement Barclay, of Pennsylvania, informs Lincoln that Gen. John Buford cannot live through day, whereupon Lincoln appoints him major general in U.S. Army and Barclay carries news to dying hero. Washington Star, 17 December 1863.

Justices of Supreme Court pay their annual visit to President. Washington Chronicle, 19 December 1863.

Benjamin P. Moore, Jr., introduced by Cong. Edwin H. Webster (Md.), interviews President and asks exemption from draft as conscientious objector. President gives him card to Sec. Stanton . Moore to Lincoln, 18 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Visits Ford's Theatre to see "Merry Wives of Windsor." Hay, Letters and Diary.

Introduces Joshua F. Speed and Joshua Tevis, of Kentucky, to Thurlow Weed, "and I think their mission an important one." Abraham Lincoln to Thurlow Weed, 17 December 1863, CW, 7:77.

Lincoln writes James H. Hoes, jeweler of Chicago: "I have received from the Sanitary Commission of Chicago, the Watch which you placed at their disposal, and I take the liberty of conveying to you my high appreciation of your humanity and generosity, of which I have unexpectedly become the beneficiary." [Lincoln received watch for gift of draft of Emancipation Proclamation to Northwest Sanitary Fair, where it sold for $3,000, making him largest individual contributor and award winner.] Abraham Lincoln to James H. Hoes, 17 December 1863, CW, 7:75.



Browse Month

President believes Gen. Schofield must be relieved of command of Dept. of Missouri. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 18 December 1863, CW, 7:78-79.

Confers with Alexander M. White of Pennsylvania representing Gov. Curtin (Pa.). Bates to Lincoln, 18 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Attends second lecture on Russia by Bayard Taylor, former secretary to minister at St. Petersburg, at Willard's Hall. Washington Chronicle, 19 December 1863; Hay, Letters and Diary.

Requests Cong. Washburne (Ill.) to superintend preparation of medal for Gen. Grant. Gaillard Hunt, Israel, Elihu, and Cadwallader Washburn: A Chapter in American Biography (New York: Macmillan, 1925), 231; Abraham Lincoln to Elihu Washburne, 18 December 1863, CW, 7:79.



Browse Month

Sec. Seward reads to President another dispatch from Cassius M. Clay, abusing Emperor Napoleon. Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 139.

President and Mrs. Lincoln invite members of Congress, other public dignitaries, and officers of Russian vessels now in American waters to reception at White House from 1 to 3 P.M. Washington Chronicle, 19 December 1863; Washington Star, 19 December 1863.

In evening Mrs. Charles Craig, of Arkansas, accompanied by H. T. Blow, calls on Lincoln and asks for pass for herself and husband to Arkansas to raise cotton on their farm. Permit to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Craig, 21 December 1863, CW, 7:83-84.

President asks Gen. Grant if, without embarrassment, Gen. Milroy could be assigned "a place." Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses S. Grant, 19 December 1863, CW, 7:80.



Browse Month

President replies to Henry C. Wright, lecturing agent of Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society: "I shall not attempt to retract or modify the emancipation proclamation; nor shall I return to slavery any person who is free by the terms of that proclamation, or by any of the acts of Congress." Abraham Lincoln to Henry C. Wright, 20 December 1863, CW, 7:81.



Browse Month

President interviews Cong. Calvin T. Hulburd (N.Y.) relative to deserters in Canada. Hulburd to Lincoln, 21 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Approves joint resolution tendering thanks of Congress and medal to Gen. Grant. Washington Chronicle, 22 December 1863.

Remains at War Dept. while decoders read message, intercepted in mail at New York, intended for Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of State (CSA). Bates, Telegraph Office, 71-72.

President informs Sens. Foster (Conn.) and Dixon (Conn.) he has sent up nomination of Henry Hammond to be marshal of Connecticut. Abraham Lincoln to Lafayette S. Foster and James Dixon, 21 December 1863, CW, 7:82-83.

Sends note to Gov. Peirpoint (Va.): "Please come up and see me to-day." Abraham Lincoln to Francis H. Peirpoint, 21 December 1863, CW, 7:83.

Comments, in letter to Sec. Stanton , on aspects of "strikes in the Ship-yards," social influence of St. Louis upon Gen. Pope, and future of Gen. Schofield. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 21 December 1863, CW, 7:84-85.



Browse Month

President transmits to Senate two conventions between U.S. and Belgium relating to Scheldt Dues, imposts upon navigation in inland waters. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 22 December 1863, CW, 7:87.

Lincoln and Secs. Seward and Welles constitute cabinet meeting. Welles, Diary.

President recognizes Henry Préant as vice consul of Russia at Philadelphia. Washington Chronicle, 24 December 1863.

Interviews former Sen. Francis Gillette (Conn.) on recommendation of Sen. Sumner (Mass.). Sumner to Lincoln, 22 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Replies to petition from citizens of St. Louis: "I have never interfered, nor thought of interfering as to who shall or shall not preach in any church. . . . If, after all, what is now sought, is to have me put Dr. M. [McPheeters] back, over the heads of a majority of his own congregation, that too, will be declined." Abraham Lincoln to Oliver D. Filley, 22 December 1863, CW, 7:85-86.

Orders Gen. Gilman Marston, military commander at Point Lookout, Md.: "If you have a prisoner by the name Linder—Daniel Linder, I think, and certainly the son of U[sher] F. Linder, of Illinois, please send him to me by an officer." Abraham Lincoln to Gilman Marston, 22 December 1863, CW, 7:87.

Directs Sec. Welles to "suppress any further publication of any part of" correspondence captured aboard Confederate ship "Ceres." Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, [22 December 1863], CW, 7:87-88.



Browse Month

Lincoln interviews William H. Craft, corporal in Co. C., 82d New York Volunteers, who fears arrest as deserter, and gives him protection back to Army of Potomac. Abraham Lincoln to Whom It May Concern, 23 December 1863, CW, 7:89.

Confers with Sen. Lane (Kans.) about affairs in Missouri and Kansas and about nomination of Gen. Schofield to be major general. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Relates dream in which he is among plain people. One of them remarks: "He is a very common-looking man." President replies: "Common-looking people are the best in the world: that is the reason the Lord makes so many of them." Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 143.

Lincoln has third interview with Sen. B. Gratz Brown (Mo.) concerning conditions in Missouri. Dennett, Hay Diaries and Letters, 140.

Transmits to Congress report regarding claims of Peruvian citizens. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 23 December 1863, CW, 7:88.

Requests Sec. Stanton : "Please see this Lady who is a Sister to our gallant and brave friend, Gen. Reynolds, who fell at Gettysburg. Please oblige her if you can." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 23 December 1863, CW, 7:88.



Browse Month

Atty. Gen. Bates at White House for conference. Bates, Diary.

President clarifies status of Gen. Banks: "I have all the while intended you to be master, as well in regard to re-organizing a State government for Louisiana, as in regard to the military matters of the Department." Abraham Lincoln to Nathaniel P. Banks, 24 December 1863, CW, 7:89-91.



Browse Month

Lincoln reads to John Hay and others article he wrote last summer upholding constitutionality and expediency of draft. Hay, Letters and Diary.

Suggests to Bayard Taylor that he prepare lecture on "Serfs, Serfdom, and Emancipation in Russia." Abraham Lincoln to Bayard Taylor, 25 December 1863, CW, 7:93.

Plans to extend practical benefits of Amnesty and Reconstruction Proclamation to people of rebellious districts. Record books will be sent to various points to receive subscriptions to oath. Hay, Letters and Diary.



Browse Month

President has audience with Baron de Stoeckl, to receive thanks of Imperial government for reception given Russian navy. Washington National Republican, 26 December 1863.

Interviews David Clark, member-elect of Maryland Legislature, regarding imprisonment of former Gov. Thomas G. Pratt (Md.). Blair to Lincoln, 26 December 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Releases prisoner of war and writes to U. F. Linder: "Your son Dan. has just left me, with my order to the Sec. of War, to administer to him the oath of allegiance, discharge him & send him to you." Abraham Lincoln to Usher F. Linder, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:94; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:95.

Orders Judge Adv. Gen. Holt: "Let the Surgeon General [William A. Hammond] be put upon trial by a court, as suggested by the Judge Advocate General." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:93-94.

Writes Sec. Stanton : "Shall we go down the river to-morrow? And if so, at what hour shall we leave the wharf? and which wharf? Mrs. L. & Tad, perhaps would go. I am not at all urgent about it, & would not have you incur the least inconvenience for it." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:95.



Browse Month

President and Sec. Stanton visit Gen. Marston and encampment of Confederate prisoners at Point Lookout. Hay, Letters and Diary; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:95.



Browse Month

President and Sec. Stanton return from visit to prison camp at Point Lookout. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 26 December 1863, CW, 7:95; N.Y. Herald, 29 December 1863.



Browse Month

Cabinet meets in afternoon with Secs. Seward and Chase, and Postmaster Gen. Blair absent. Welles, Diary.

Delegation from Baltimore calls on President and protests removal of Joseph J. Stewart as collector for Second District. Memorandum Concerning Joseph J. Stewart, 29 December 1863, CW, 7:97.

President sends notice that he will receive army officers at New Year's Day reception at 11:30 A.M. DNA—WR RG 94, Adjt. Gen. Off., Letters Received, Box 711.



Browse Month

President recognizes José Carlos Tracy as consul of Peru at New York. Washington Star, 2 January 1863.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President issues additional instructions to direct tax commissioners for district of South Carolina. Additional Instructions to Direct Tax Commissioners, 31 December 1863, CW, 7:98-99.

Lincoln meets with foreign minister Count Edward Piper, who represents Sweden and Norway. As the agent of King Charles XV, Count Piper presents Lincoln with a "volume containing engravings of the Royal collection of arms." Previously, Lincoln "presented to His Majesty, a pair of pistols, of American workmanship." Lincoln and Piper express "mutual good wishes . . . for the continuance of the cordial relations now existing between the two Governments." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 31 December 1863, 2:4.