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31 entries found


Browse Month

Gen. Burnside consults with President and restates part of conversation in letter: "Doubtless this difference of opinion between my general officers and myself results from a lack of confidence in me. . . . It is my belief that I ought to retire to private life." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 1 January 1863, CW, 6:31-33.

New Year's Day reception at White House begins at 11 A.M. Washington Chronicle, 2 January 1863.

Army officers assemble at War Dept. and attend reception in body. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Public reception begins at 12 M. and lasts until 2 P.M. Notes, 1 January 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Sec. Welles exchanges greetings with President and colleagues at Executive Mansion. Welles, Diary.

At noon Sec. Seward and Asst. Sec. Seward take official copy of Emancipation Proclamation to room in White House where cabinet meets. Shortly afterward President signs it. Frederick W. Seward, Reminiscences of a War-Time Statesman and Diplomat, 1830-1915. By Frederick W. Seward, Assistant Secretary of State during the Administrations of Lincoln, Johnson, and Hayes (New York: Putnam, 1916), 227.

After White House reception Lincoln goes to telegraph office in War Dept., settles at Maj. Eckert's desk, puts feet on nearby table, and relaxes in conversation with Gen. Halleck and Asst. Sec. Fox. Bates, Telegraph Office, 143.

Prepares instructions for Gen. Halleck to visit Burnside's headquarters and pass judgment on plan to move army across Rappahannock, then withdraws instructions because considered harsh by Halleck. Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 1 January 1863, CW, 6:31-33.

Directs Sec. Stanton to investigate "piteous appeal . . . made . . . by an old lady" who had been ordered to evacuate her boarding house. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 1 January 1863, CW, 6:33.



Browse Month

George P. Strong, resident of St. Louis, delivers to President letter from Gen. Curtis regarding order to exile Rev. McPheeters. Abraham Lincoln to Samuel R. Curtis, 2 January 1863, CW, 6:33-34.

Gen. Butler at White House in evening for conference. Washington Chronicle, 3 January 1863.

Says President asks him to go to Mississippi and organize Negro troops. Benjamin F. Butler, Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences . . . Butler's Book (Boston: A. M. Thayer, 1892), 549-50.

President submits to Congress expediency of appointing an acting head of government department. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 2 January 1863, CW, 6:34-35.



Browse Month

Sen. Browning (Ill.) confers with President about Confederates attacking Fortress Monroe, Va. Browning, Diary.

Prof. Benjamin N. Martin, "University of the City of New York," calls on Lincoln regarding restoration of Gen. Benham's commission. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 3 January 1863, CW, 6:35.

President sends to Senate convention for adjustment of claims between U.S. and Ecuador. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 3 January 1863, CW, 6:35-36.

Receives word that U.S.S. "Monitor" has foundered in gale off Cape Hatteras, N.C. Nicolay to Bates, 4 January 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Committee composed of Giles F. Filley, merchant, and James E. Yeatman, banker, of St. Louis presents memorial of citizens asking relief for Rev. McPheeters. Abraham Lincoln to Samuel R. Curtis, 2 January 1863, CW, 6:33-34.

Lincoln responds to appeal: "Let this woman have her boy out of Old Capitol Prison." Endorsement, 3 January 1863, CW, 6:35.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

Cesar J. Kaskel, sponsored by Cong. John A. Gurley (Ohio), interviews Lincoln regarding order issued by Gen. Grant expelling Jews from Military Department of Tennessee. Bertram W. Korn, American Jewry and the Civil War (Philadelphia, PA: Jewish Publication Society of America, 1951), 125.

James M. Winchell, newspaper correspondent, interviews President on Battle of Stone's River. J. M. Winchell, "Three Interviews with President Lincoln," Galaxy 16 (July 1873):33-34.

Lincoln attends New York Avenue Presbyterian Church and drives Sen. Browning (Ill.) home. Browning, Diary.

Lincoln directs Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles to "hear and consider" the requests of "refugees" from Virginia who seek to "remove their families and property to protection within the Union lines, by means of our armed gunboats on the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay." Lincoln states that "many persons" have applied for "permission" to relocate, and he asks Welles to determine the "proper" way to assist them. Abraham Lincoln to Gideon Welles, 4 January 1863, CW, 6:36.



Browse Month

President transmits to House of Representatives report regarding interference of U.S. minister to Mexico in favor of French. Abraham Lincoln to the House of Representatives, 5 January 1863, CW, 6:38-39.

Congratulates Gen. William S. Rosecrans on victory in Battle of Murfreesboro (Stone's River): "God bless you, and all with you!" Abraham Lincoln to William S. Rosecrans, 5 January 186[3], CW, 6:39.

Sen. Harlan (Iowa) visits President and delivers communication from Religious Society of Friends of Prairie Grove, Ark. Abraham Lincoln to Caleb Russell and Sallie A. Fenton, 5 January 1863, CW, 6:39-40.

Missouri congressman lay before President request that practice of assessments be discontinued. Abraham Lincoln to Samuel R. Curtis, 5 January 1863, CW, 6:36-38.

Lincoln receives December salary warrant for $2,022.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.

Borrows from Library of Congress: "Atlantic [magazine], Jan.-June 1861." Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 114, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

Col. Daniel Ullmann and Capt. Alban B. Botsford, both of 78th New York Infantry, confer with President in matter of organizing brigade of Negro troops in Louisiana. Memorandum Concerning Alban B. Botsford, 6 January 1863, CW, 6:41.

Lincoln directs Sec. Seward not to countersign contract between U.S. government and B. Kock for colonizing 5,000 Negroes on Ile à Vache. Abraham Lincoln to William H. Seward, 6 January 1863, CW, 6:41-42.

Interviews Strange N. Palmer, father of Robert M. Palmer, late minister to Argentine, and Simon Cameron regarding commission in Marine Corps for Strange J. Palmer. Palmer to Lincoln, 27 March 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

[Irwin deposits $450 in Springfield Marine Bank, payments on principal and interest on Springfield City Bond. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165.]

Lincoln writes a second letter to Mrs. Abraham (Jane) Hoge, of Chicago, Illinois, regarding her request to obtain a "staff officer" appointment for her son. Previously, Lincoln outlined the "conditions" that would allow him to proceed with the appointment. He reiterates, "A Major-General must be found who has not already the full complement of Staff-officers...and who is willing to take your son as one of them. Without these I should violate both law, and an indispensable courtesy, to thrust your son, or any one else, upon any Major General's staff." Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Abraham H. Hoge, 25 November 1862, CW, 5:512; Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Abraham H. Hoge, 6 January 1863, CW, 6:40-41.



Browse Month

President discusses with former Cong. Green Adams (Ky.) proposition to raise and arm special force in Kentucky. Abraham Lincoln to Green Adams, 7 January 1863, CW, 6:42.

Informs B. Gratz Brown, antisecessionist and Democratic candidate in senatorial election in Missouri: "The Administration takes no part between it's friends in Mo." Abraham Lincoln to B. Gratz Brown, 7 January 1863, CW, 6:42-43.

Col. Walter B. Scates, former chief justice of Illinois Supreme Court, hands to President letter from Gen. McClernand protesting Emancipation Proclamation as mitigating chances of negotiating peace with South. Abraham Lincoln to John A. McClernand, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:48-49.

Sen. Sumner (Mass.) again interviews President about returning Gen. Butler to New Orleans. Benjamin F. Butler, Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences . . . Butler's Book (Boston: A. M. Thayer, 1892), 552.



Browse Month

Lincoln replies to Gen. McClernand that Emancipation Proclamation has been issued and "broken eggs can not be mended." Abraham Lincoln to John A. McClernand, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:48-49.

Sends felicitations to José M. Acha on reelection to presidency of Republic of Bolivia. Abraham Lincoln to José M. Acha, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:45.

Proclaims treaty of peace, friendship, commerce, and navigation with Republic of Bolivia. Washington Chronicle, 30 April 1863.

Senate confirms nomination of John P. Usher to be secretary of interior. Washington Star, 9 January 1863.

[Irwin withdraws $102 from Springfield Marine Bank, to pay taxes. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]

Mrs. Fox at White House for social visit with Mrs. Lincoln. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President orders that attorney general be charged with direction of all proceedings under Act of August 6, 1861, as fully in all respects as under Act of July 17, 1862. Order to Edward Bates, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:45-46.

Writes Gen. Burnside: "I deplore the want of concurrence with you, in opinion by your general officers, but I do not see the remedy. . . . I do not yet see how I could profit by changing the command of the A.P. & if I did, I should not wish to do it by accepting the resignation of your commission." Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:46-48.

Inquires of Mil. Gov. Johnson about Capt. Charles S. Todd, 6th Kentucky Regiment, killed at Battle of Murfreesboro. Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 8 January 1863, CW, 6:48.



Browse Month

Cabinet meets. No announcement of transactions. Welles, Diary.

Sen. Powell (Ky.) calls on President and demands unconditional release of William S. Pryor, J. O'Hara, and Col. Thomas L. Jones (CSA), Kentuckians now on parole. Memorandum Concerning William S. Pryor, J. O'Hara, and Thomas L. Jones, 9 January 1863, CW, 6:50.

President transmits to Congress correspondence concerning international agricultural exhibition in city of Hamburg. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 9 January 1863, CW, 6:51.

In evening consults with Sens. Browning (Ill.) and Hale (N.H.) and Rear Adm. Andrew H. Foote about compensated emancipation. Browning, Diary.



Browse Month

President consults with Secs. Welles and Stanton on problem of employment of contrabands (Negroes from Confederacy within Union lines). Welles, Diary.

Writes Gen. Curtis at St. Louis: "I understand there is considerable trouble with the slaves in Missouri. Please do your best to keep peace on the question for two or three weeks, by which time we hope to do something here towards settling the question, in Missouri." Abraham Lincoln to Samuel R. Curtis, 10 January 1863, CW, 6:52-53.

Informs Gov. Johnson (Tenn.): "I presume the remains of Capt. Todd are in the hands of his family friends, & I wish to give no order on the subject. But I do wish your opinion of the effects of the late battles about Murfreesboro, upon the prospects of Tennessee." Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, 10 January 1863, CW, 6:53.

In evening attends patriotic readings delivered by James E. Murdoch, elocutionist, in Senate. Washington Chronicle, 11 January 1863.



Browse Month

Lincoln receives from Commissioner French request for $200 to aid families of District Volunteers. French to Lincoln, 11 January 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Asks Sen. Jacob Collamer (Vt.) to call at once if not going to church, otherwise as soon as convenient. Abraham Lincoln to Jacob Collamer, 11 January 1863, CW, 6:53-54.



Browse Month

President and Sec. Stanton in morning conference on army affairs. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 12 January 1863, CW, 6:55.

Lincoln instructs Judge Adv. Gen. Holt to revise proceedings of courtmartial in case of Gen. Fitz John Porter, on trial in connection with failure of Gen. Pope's campaign, August 1862, and to report on other aspects of trial. Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Holt, 12 January 1863, CW, 5:54.

Acknowledges receipt of resolutions of Connecticut Legislature favorable to administration forwarded by Gov. Buckingham (Conn.). Abraham Lincoln to William A. Buckingham, 12 January 1863, CW, 5:54.

Sen. Sumner (Mass.) calls on President at night and reads letter from George Livermore of Boston acknowledging receipt of pen used by Lincoln to sign "New Years" proclamation (Emancipation Proclamation). Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 31 January 1863.

Mrs. Lincoln borrows "Why Paul Ferroll killed his wife" from Library of Congress. [Mrs. Caroline Wigley Clive, Why Paul Ferroll killed his wife, London, 1860.] Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 114, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

Cabinet examines intercepted mail in possession of Sec. Welles. Welles, Diary.



Browse Month

President informs House of Representatives that it would not be compatible with public interest to make known communications with New Granada (Colombia and Panama). Abraham Lincoln to the House of Representatives, 14 January 1863, CW, 6:56-58.

Relative to practical advantages of Emancipation Proclamation he writes Gen. Dix at Fortress Monroe, Va.: "I therefore will thank you for your well considered opinion whether Fortress-Monroe, and York-Town, one or both, could not, in whole or in part, be garrisoned by colored troops, leaving the white forces now necessary at those places to be employed elsewhere." Abraham Lincoln to John A. Dix, 14 January 1863, CW, 6:56.



Browse Month

In morning President confers with Capt. Dahlgren at Navy Yard regarding Capt. Diller's gunpowder. Extracts from Dahlgren Diary, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Endorsement Concerning Isaac R. Diller's Gundpowder, 15 January 1863, CW, 6:59.



Browse Month

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.

Cong. Robert McKnight (Pa.) and Gen. Heintzelman interview President regarding appointment of Heintzelman's son to West Point. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln borrows "Hume's England 2d" from Library of Congress. [David Hume, The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688, Boston, 1854.] Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 114, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

In morning Lincoln discusses state of Union with Horace Greeley, then interviews Capt. James M. Rice accompanied by former Sen. O. H. Browning (Ill.), Washington attorney. Browning, Diary.

Lincoln signs a resolution that Congress passed concerning military pay. The resolution allows the treasury secretary to "make an additional issue of one hundred millions of dollars . . . for the payment of the army and navy." Lincoln seeks a "prompt discharge of all arrears of pay due to our soldiers and our sailors." He takes the opportunity to address the over-issuance of government and bank notes. Lincoln explains, "A judicious measure to prevent the deterioration of this currency, by a reasonable taxation of bank circulation or otherwise is needed." Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 17 January 1863, CW, 6:60-62.

Mrs. Lincoln holds Saturday afternoon reception. Fox, Diary, Gist-Blair Family Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

President attends morning service at Foundry M. E. Church, 14th and G Sts. NW., and becomes "Life Director of the Parent Society" in return for contribution of $150. Washington Chronicle, 19 January 1863.

Converses with Assoc. Justice Davis on topics in general and reconstructed cabinet in particular. Browning, Diary.



Browse Month

President replies to laudatory address from workingmen of Manchester, England: "It is now a pleasant duty to acknowledge the demonstration you have given of your desire that a spirit of peace and amity towards this country may prevail in the councils of your Queen." Abraham Lincoln to the Workingmen of Manchester, England, 19 January 1863, CW, 6:63-65.

In afternoon J. E. Murdoch gives patriotic readings to select group at White House. In evening President and Mrs. Lincoln attend readings in Senate. Murdoch reads "Sleeping Sentinel" by Francis De Haes Janvier. LL, No. 544; Washington Chronicle, 20 January 1863.



Browse Month

At cabinet meeting President asks secretaries for opinions on relative merits of five-foot gauge railroad as opposed to four-foot-one-and-a-half-inch gauge. Order Establishing Gauge of Union Pacific Railroad, 21 January 1863, CW, 6:68.

Transmits to Senate report regarding exportation of articles of contraband for use of French army in Mexico. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 20 January 1863, CW, 6:66-67.

Receives request from Gov. Yates (Ill.) for appointment of Col. William Ross as bearer of dispatches so that he may go to Europe for eye operation. Yates to Lincoln, 20 January 1863, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Army of Potomac on march. Blizzard sweeps country. Lincoln in White House hears frozen crystals beat on windows of office. Monaghan, Diplomat, 279.

Deplores distress of people in southwest Missouri and informs Samuel T. Glover, prominent Unionist, that Congress would oppose extension of railroad to Springfield, Mo. Abraham Lincoln to Samuel T. Glover, 20 January 1863, CW, 6:66.



Browse Month

President approves sentence dismissing Gen. Fitz John Porter from service. Order Approving Sentence of Fitz-John Porter, 21 January 1863, CW, 6:67.

Establishes width of track of Pacific railroads at five feet. Order Establishing Gauge of Union Pacific Railroad, 21 January 1863, CW, 6:68.

Submits to Congress joint resolutions of corporate authorities of city of Washington urging construction of railroads concentrating upon city. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 21 January 1863, CW, 6:68-69.

Endorses letter of Gen. Halleck to Gen. Grant: "It may be proper to give you some explanation of the revocation of your order expelling all Jews from your department. The President has no objection to your expelling traitors and Jew peddlers, which, I suppose was the object of your order; but, as it in terms proscribed an entire religious class, some of whom are fighting in our ranks, the President deemed it necessary to revoke it." Official Records—Armies 1, XXIV, pt. 1, 9.



Browse Month

Mr. Prentiss, attorney for Herman Koppel of Charleston, appeals to President to remit proceeds of property condemned by prize court. Memorandum Concerning Herman Koppel, 22 January 1863, CW, 6:72.

Jonathan Amory, U.S. dispatch agent at Boston, interviews President on behalf of son, Col. Thomas J. C. Amory. Memorandum: Appointment of Thomas J. C. Amory, 22 January 1863, CW, 6:71-72.

Gen. McClernand, reduced to corps commander, blames Gen. Halleck and interviews President who counsels "that for your sake, for my sake, & for the country's sake," he forget personal grievances. Abraham Lincoln to John A. McClernand, 22 January 1863, CW, 6:70-71.

Lincoln advises Gen. Stephen A. Hurlbut to dismiss thought of coming to Washington now that "you stand well with the Sec. of War." Abraham Lincoln to Stephen A. Hurlbut, 22 January 1863, CW, 6:70.

Promises to nominate Gen. Frederick Steele a major general upon satisfactory explanation of charges made against him for returning fugitive slaves. Abraham Lincoln to Frederick Steele, 22 January 1863, CW, 6:72-73.



Browse Month

President interviews Mrs. John Green who asks promotion for husband. Memorandum: Promotion of John Green, 23 January 1863, CW, 6:76.

Mrs. Col. Kingsbury calls on Lincoln and asks that John J. D. Kingsbury be appointed to West Point. Memorandum: Appointment of John J. D. Kingsbury, 23 January 1863, CW, 6:75-76.

President wishes secretary of war to arrange for Gen. Butler to start for New Orleans by February 1, 1863. "I think we can not longer dispense with Gen. Butler's service." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 23 January 1863, CW, 6:76-77.

Transmits to Congress report regarding regulations pertaining to U.S. consular courts in Turkey. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 23 January 1863, CW, 6:76.



Browse Month

President poses for photographs by Alexander Gardner, M. B. Brady's assistant. LL, No. 211.

Group of Boston antislavery men, including Wendell Phillips, calls on Lincoln, who excuses himself until next day. Moncure D. Conway, Autobiography, Memoirs, and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway, 2 vols. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1904), 377-82.

California committee meets with cabinet to discuss gauge of Pacific railroads. Welles, Diary.

"The reception at the Executive Mansion to-day by the President and Mrs. Lincoln was unusually well attended." N.Y. Herald, 25 January 1863.

Mrs. Lincoln grants interview to Wendell Phillips. Moncure D. Conway, Autobiography, Memoirs, and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway, 2 vols. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1904), 377-82.



Browse Month

President in 10 A.M. conference with Gens. Burnside and Halleck announces decision to relieve Burnside and put Gen. Hooker in command. Nicolay to Bates, 25 January 1863, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 25 January 1863, CW, 6:77-78.

Boston antislavery group accompanied by Sen. Wilson (Mass.) calls upon President and complains that Emancipation Proclamation has failed to accomplish its purpose. William D. Kelley, Lincoln and Stanton: A Study of the War Administration of 1861 and 1862: with Special Consideration of Some Recent Statements of Gen. George B. McClellan (New York: Putnam, 1885), 87-88.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President Lincoln writes to Major General Joseph Hooker, the new "head of the Army of the Potomac." Lincoln admires Hooker's bravery, "confidence," and "ambitio[n], which within reasonable bounds, does good rather than harm." But, Lincoln chides the General with respect to Hooker's predecessor General Ambrose Burnside: "[Y]ou . . . thwarted him as much as you could [and in so doing] . . . you did a great wrong to the country, and to a most meritorious and honorable brother officer. . . . Neither you, nor Napoleon, if he were alive again, could get any good out of an army, while such a spirit prevails . . . Beware of rashness, but with energy, and sleepless vigilance, go forward, and give us victories." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph Hooker, 26 January 1863, CW, 6:78-79.

Transmits to Senate documents respecting capture of British vessels having on board contraband of war. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 26 January 1863, CW, 6:79.

Tells O. H. Browning story of Gen. Burnside's resignation and Hooker's appointment. Browning, Diary.

Simon Cameron interviews President to protest sending Gen. Butler to New Orleans because Butler is likely candidate for next President and must be in Washington for political reasons. Butler, Correspondence, 2:590.

Presumably Mrs. Lincoln borrows from Library of Congress for use of Tad "Buckland Natural History." [Francis Trevelyan Buckland, Curiosities of Natural History, N.Y., 1859.] Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 114, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln thanks George E. Fawcett, music teacher of Muscatine, Iowa, "for your thoughtful courtesy in sending me a copy of your 'Emancipation March.' " Abraham Lincoln to George E. Fawcett, 26 January 1863, CW, 6:78.



Browse Month

New Entry

Lincoln writes to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton regarding John B. Gordon, whom U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs William P. Dole recommends for a "Military Storekeeper" position. Lincoln notes, "If there be a vacancy, let him have it, unless by some paper on file, I am committed for it to some one else." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 27 January 1863, IHi, Springfield, IL; CW, 10:176.



Browse Month

President interviews Gen. Andrew A. Humphreys regarding promotion. Abraham Lincoln to Ambrose E. Burnside, 28 January 1862 [1863], CW, 6:81.

Recommends vote of thanks of Congress be given Acting Rear Adm. David D. Porter for contributing to surrender of Post of Arkansas (Fort Hindman) on January 10, 1863. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 28 January 1863, CW, 6:82.

Summons Gen. Butler: "Please come here immediately. Telegraph me about what time you will arrive." Abraham Lincoln to Benjamin F. Butler, 28 January 1863, CW, 6:81-82.



Browse Month

Joshua F. Speed tells Lincoln that he does not want agency at Goose Creek Salt Works near Manchester, Ky. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 29 January 1863, CW, 6:83.

Lincoln writes Thurlow Weed: "Your valedictory to the patrons of the Albany Evening Journal brings me a good deal of uneasiness. What does it mean?" [Weed could not accept abolition fanaticism dividing the North.] Abraham Lincoln to Thurlow Weed, 29 January 1863, CW, 6:83-84.



Browse Month

Cabinet meets. Welles, Diary.



Browse Month

President receives Sen. Powell (Ky.) who brings list of persons and fines collected from them by army officers in Kentucky. Memorandum Concerning Fines Collected from Kentuckians, 31 January 1863, CW, 6:85-86.

Writes Gen. Meigs on behalf of James C. Conkling of Illinois: "He has ample business qualifications, is entirely trustworthy; and with all is my personal friend of long standing." Abraham Lincoln to Montgomery C. Meigs, 31 January 1863, CW, 6:85.

Writes Col. Joseph P. Taylor, Commissary General: "Please see the bearer, Edward D. Baker, who is a son of my old friend Col. Baker, . . . He now wishes to be a Commissary . . . if you can inform me that he can be made such consistently with the rules of the service, I will oblige him." Abraham Lincoln to Joseph P. Taylor, 31 January 1863, CW, 6:86.

White House reception in evening attended by Gen. Heintzelman and wife. Journal, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.