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30 entries found


Browse Month

Revised Entry

President and Mrs. Lincoln hold New Year's reception at Executive Mansion from 11 A.M. to 2 P.M. Members of cabinet and families enter first, followed by gold-braided diplomatic corps, justices of Supreme Court, and officers of army and navy. At 12 M. gates are opened to public. Nicolay to Bates, 2 January 1862, 3 January 1862, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Washington Star, 1 January 1862.

Lincoln writes Gen. Buell at Louisville, Ky.: "General McClellan should not yet be disturbed with business. I think you better get in concert with General Halleck at once. I write you to-night. I also telegraph and write Halleck." Abraham Lincoln to Don C. Buell, 1 January 1862, CW, 5:86.

Advises Halleck at St. Louis: "Gen. McClellan should not yet be disturbed with business. I think Gen. Buell and yourself should be in communication and concert at once. I write you to-night, and also Telegraph and write him." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 1 January 1861 [1862], CW, 5:87.

Informs Halleck: "General McClellan is not dangerously ill, as I hope, but would better not to be disturbed . . . I am very anxious that, in case of General Buell's moving toward Nashville, the enemy shall not be greatly re-enforced, and I think there is danger he will be from Columbus. It seems to me that a real or feigned attack upon Columbus from up-river at the same time would either prevent this or compensate for it by throwing Columbus into our hands." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 1 January 1862, CW, 5:87.

President Lincoln writes to General George B. McClellan regarding the general's "uneasiness" about "the doings" of Congress's Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War. Lincoln explains, "You may be entirely relieved . . . The gentlemen of the Committee were with me an hour and a half last night; and I found them in a perfectly good mood. As their investigation brings them acquainted with facts, they are rapidly coming to think of the whole case as all sensible men would." Abraham Lincoln to George B. McClellan, 1 January 1862, CW, 5:88.



Browse Month

President visits Gen. McClellan, who is at home ill, and finds that "he is very much better." Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, 2 January 1862, CW, 5:88.

Sends communication to Congress regarding London industrial exhibition. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 2 January 1862, CW, 5:88.

Drives to Navy Yard in afternoon with Asst. Sec. Fox to observe firing of 150-pound rifled cannon. "For the first time I heard the President speak of the bare possibility of our being two nations." Extracts from Dahlgren Diary, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

President transmits to Senate treaty with tribe of Potawatomi Indians. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 3 January 1862, CW, 5:89.

At 8 P.M. attends fifth lecture by Horace Greeley at Smithsonian. Occupies seat on platform. Discourtesy toward President exhibited by Fremont clique. Washington Star, 4 January 1862.



Browse Month

Lincoln stands on sidewalk in front of White House and reviews 6th U.S. Cavalry in forenoon. Washington Star, 4 January 1862.

Telegraphs Gen. Buell: "Have arms gone forward for East-Tennessee? Please tell me the progress and condition of the movement, in that direction." Abraham Lincoln to Don C. Buell, 4 January 1862, CW, 5:90.



Browse Month

Postmaster Gen. Blair at White House for talk on foreign affairs. Blair to Lincoln, 7 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

President visits Gen. McClellan still confined at home with typhoid fever. Shows him dispatch from Gen. Buell relative to military situation in East Tennessee. Abraham Lincoln to Don C. Buell, 6 January 1862, CW, 5:91.

Cabinet meets 7:30 P.M. at request of Joint Committee on Conduct of War. Lincoln rejects demand of Sen. Wade (Ohio) for removal of McClellan. Thomas Harry Williams, Lincoln and the Radicals (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1941), 83.

Receives December salary warrant for $2,083.33. Pratt, Personal Finances, 182.



Browse Month

President requests Gens. Buell and Halleck to name day they can move southward in concert for ultimate protection of East Tennessee. Abraham Lincoln to Don C. Buell, 7 January 1862, CW, 5:91-92; Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 7 January 1862, CW, 5:92.

Complains about telegraph service to and from Louisville, Ky., and gets report from Capt. Anson Stager, manager of military telegraph. Stager to Lincoln, 8 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Acknowledges receipt of memorial from English Friends containing "generous suggestions in the interests of peace and humanity." Abraham Lincoln to Francis T. King and Others, 7 January 1862, CW, 5:92.

Holds levee for overflow crowd from 8:30 to 10:30 P.M. Washington Star, 8 January 1862.

[Irwin deposits $317.58, interest on notes of N. W. Edwards, in Springfield Marine Bank and withdraws $3. Pratt, Personal Finances, 165, 177.]



Browse Month

President with Mrs. Lincoln and party attends celebration of French regiment quartered in Tennallytown, DC. Washington Star, 9 January 1862.

Converses at length with Gen. James Shields, who once challenged him to duel in Springfield. [See 19 September 1842.] Washington Star, 9 January 1862.

White House requests loan of "Halleck's Science of War" from Library of Congress. [Henry W. Halleck, Elements of Military Art and Science, N.Y., 1861.] Borrowers' Ledger 1861-63, 114, Archives of the Library of Congress, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

President and John Nicolay are at Capitol attending to public business. Boston Advertiser, 10 January 1862.

Lincoln writes Gen. McClellan: "I think you better go before the Congressional Committee the earliest moment your health will permit—to-day, if possible." Also: "I send the within copy of dispatch from Gen. Buell, with the remark that neither he nor Halleck meets my request to name the day when they can be ready to move." Abraham Lincoln to George B. McClellan, 9 January 1862, CW, 5:94; Abraham Lincoln to George B. McClellan, 9 January 1862, CW, 5:94.



Browse Month

Cabinet meets. Atty. Gen. Bates complains that administration is not assuming strong enough stand in eliminating confusion. Bates, Diary.

President transmits to Congress Austrian documents relating to "Trent" affair. National Intelligencer, 15 January 1862; Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 10 January 1862, CW, 5:95-96.

Recognizes C. F. Adac as consul of Dukedom of Saxe-Meiningen for Western U.S. National Intelligencer, 15 January 1862.

Interviews Rev. Thomas K. Beecher, brother of better-known Henry Ward Beecher, clergyman, reformer, and abolitionist. Robbins to Lincoln, 10 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Consults with Thurlow Weed regarding reputation of Sec. Cameron and his removal from cabinet. Thurlow W. Barnes, ed., Life of Thurlow Weed including his Autobiography and a Memoir, 2 vols. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1884), 2:330-31.

"President comes to me [Gen. Meigs] much depressed re inactivity of army and McClellan's sickness. 'The people are impatient; Chase has no money, and he tells me he can raise no money; the Gen. of the Army has typhoid fever. The bottom is out of the tub. What shall I do?' " Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Montgomery C. Meigs, "Documents: General M. C. Meigs on the Conduct of the Civil War," American Historical Review 26 (January 1921):292.

President summons Gens. McDowell and Franklin, Secs. Seward and Chase, and Asst. Sec. Scott to "Council of War" at 8 P.M. Washington Chronicle, 3 November 1864.

Writes Cameron: "The within is a copy of a letter just received from General Halleck. It is exceedingly discouraging. As everywhere else, nothing can be done." Abraham Lincoln to Simon Cameron, 10 January 1862, CW, 5:95.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President Lincoln writes two letters to Secretary of War Simon Cameron regarding a new role for Cameron within the administration. In the first letter, Lincoln notes, "As you have, more than once, expressed a desire for a change of position, I can now gratify you." Lincoln plans to nominate Cameron for Minister to Russia. Lincoln labels a second letter, "Private," and in it he confides that the new position will allow Cameron "to render services to your country, not less important than those you could render at home." Abraham Lincoln to Simon Cameron, 11 January 1862, CW, 5:96; Abraham Lincoln to Simon Cameron, 11 January 1862, CW, 5:96-97.

Telegraphs Gov. Andrew (Mass.) to help Gen. Butler "officer his two un-officered regiments." Boston Advertiser, 22 January 1862; Abraham Lincoln to John A. Andrew, 11 January 1862, CW, 5:96; Official Records—Armies 3, I, 862.

Calls second meeting of "Council of War" to discuss immediate operation of Army of Potomac. Washington Chronicle, 3 November 1864.



Browse Month

Lincoln receives unexpected visit from Gen. McClellan. McClellan, War for Union, 156.

At 1 P.M. convenes another meeting of Gens. McDowell, Franklin, and Meigs, Secs. Seward and Chase, and Postmaster Gen. Blair. Adjourns meeting until tomorrow, when McClellan will be present. Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Interviews Dr. Fuller, clergyman from Baltimore. Harris to Lincoln, 12 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

In evening Sen. Browning (Ill.) calls at White House. Lincoln thinking of taking field himself. Has several plans. Browning, Diary.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

Cabinet in special meeting at 11 A.M. Philadelphia News, 13 January 1862.

Lincoln names E. M. Stanton his secretary of war to succeed Simon Cameron. Abraham Lincoln to Simon Cameron, 11 January 1862, CW, 5:96.

Sends to Senate nomination of Cameron as minister to Russia. Washington Star, 14 January 1862.

In afternoon convenes council of several generals, including Gen. McClellan, and cabinet members to discuss military plans. McClellan declines to give details of his plans for fear of leak; considers council military cabal against him. Diary, Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Montgomery C. Meigs, "Documents: General M. C. Meigs on the Conduct of the Civil War," American Historical Review 26 (January 1921):292.

President Lincoln writes to Brigadier General Don C. Buell concerning military strategy, and states that although his suggestions are not "orders," he would like them to be "respectfully considered." Lincoln offers his assessment of the war: "We have the greater numbers, and the enemy has the greater facility of concentrating forces upon points of collision." Lincoln suggests that the Union forces pressure the enemy "at different points, at the same time; so that we can safely attack, one, or both, if he makes no change." Lincoln to Buell (copy), 13 January 1862, Edwin M. Stanton Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Don C. Buell, 13 January 1862, CW, 5:98-99.



Browse Month

Lincoln arranges for public demonstration of Levi Short's Greek Fire shells in Treasury Park. Bruce, Tools of War, 181.

Attends public reception in evening at White House. Nicolay to Bates, 15 January 1862, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

[Irwin withdraws $7 from Springfield Marine Bank. Pratt, Personal Finances, 177.]



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President's nomination of E. M. Stanton for secretary of war confirmed by Senate. National Intelligencer, 16 January 1862.

In evening Charles H. Upton, district commissioner, at White House by appointment; but leaves after long wait without seeing President. Upton to Lincoln, 16 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln writes to Major-General Henry W. Halleck and introduces former lieutenant-governor of Illinois Gustave Koerner. With Halleck's consent, Lincoln would like to "make [Koerner] a brigadier-general" under Halleck's command. Lincoln assures Halleck that Koerner will help to ease the tensions among the German-American Union soldiers who are upset over the "want of pay." Lincoln refers to Koerner as a "personal friend" and he adds, "[H]e will simply be an efficient, zealous, and unselfish assistant to you." Abraham Lincoln to Henry W. Halleck, 15 January 1862, CW, 5:99-100; Abraham Lincoln to Gustave P. Koerner, 15 January 1862, CW, 5:100-101; Henry W. Halleck to Abraham Lincoln, 21 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

Lincoln gives first written assignment to new secretary of war, E. M. Stanton : "If a clerkship can be given Mr. [Richard D.] Goodwin I shall be very glad I am very earnest about this." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 16 January 1862, CW, 5:101.



Browse Month

In morning Lincoln consults with Edwards Pierrepont, former superior court judge of City of New York. Pierrepont to Lincoln, 19 January 1862, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

In afternoon discusses with Gen. James H. Lane surrender of fugitives to loyal owners. Report of W. A. Croffut to N.Y. Tribune, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Atty. Gen. Bates confers with Lincoln and delivers papers relating to Wheeler pardon case. Bates to Washburne, 17 January 1862, Elihu B. Washburne Papers, Library of Congress, Washington DC.

The Chevalier Bertinatti, minister resident of Italy, calls and presents communication from King Victor Emmanuel. Seward to Lincoln, 16 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln transmits to Senate petition of certain members of Potawatomi tribe of Indians complaining about treaty made on November 15, 1862 last. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 17 January 1862, CW, 5:101-2.

Sends to Congress documentation exchanged with Prussia regarding "Trent" affair. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 17 January 1862, CW, 5:102.



Browse Month

Delegation consisting of Cong. Crittenden (Ky.) and Sens. John P. Hale (N.H.), Henry S. Lane (Ind.), and James W. Nesmith (Oreg.) confers with President on behalf of Maj. Henry D. Wallen. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 18 January 1862, CW, 5:103.

Mrs. Lincoln sends carriage to bring Sen. Browning (Ill.) to White House in evening. Lincoln and Browning talk for more than hour. Sen. Garrett Davis (Ky.) joins them. Browning, Diary.



Browse Month

President signs appointment of E. M. Stanton as secretary of war. William D. Kelley, Lincoln and Stanton: A Study of the War Administration of 1861 and 1862: with Special Consideration of Some Recent Statements of Gen. George B. McClellan (New York: Putnam, 1885), 17.

Receives written protest from committee representing 14th Brooklyn Regiment against change in number to 84th. N.Y. Tribune, 21 January 1862.



Browse Month

President in fine spirits at White House reception tonight. N.Y. Herald, 22 January 1862.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President sends letters of sympathy and congratulation to King of Portugal: sympathy at death of brothers, congratulation on accession to throne and marriage of sister. Abraham Lincoln to Luiz I, 22 January 1862, CW, 5:104-5; Abraham Lincoln to Luiz I, 22 January 1862, CW, 5:105.

Interviews Mrs. Schermerhorn and son regarding appointment to Military Academy. Seward to Lincoln, 21 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Committee of New York Germans calls on President in protest against treatment of Gen. Franz Sigel. N.Y. Tribune, 23 January 1862; Card of admission, 22 January 1862, John G. Nicolay Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

California delegation in Congress presents portrait of late Col. Baker to Lincoln as gift from William B. Farwell of San Francisco. Phelps to Lincoln, 22 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

Lincoln transmits to Senate articles of agreement with Ponca tribe of Indians. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, [22] January 1862, CW, 5:106-7.

In evening witnesses another exhibition of Greek Fire shells on grounds south of White House. National Intelligencer, 23 January 1862.

In a letter to the Secretary of the War Edwin M. Stanton, President Lincoln rejects Stanton's suggestion to have "the Adjutant General [Lorenzo Thomas] . . . attend me wherever I go." Lincoln writes, "[I]t would be an uncompensating incumbrance both to him and me. When it shall occur to me to go anywhere, I wish to be free to go at once . . . It is better too, for the public service, that he shall give his time to the business of his office, and not to personal attendance on me." Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 22 January 1862, CW, 5:108.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

President confers with Lt. Henry A. Wise (USN), Navy Bureau of Ordnance, regarding mortars under construction at Pittsburgh. Abraham Lincoln to Andrew H. Foote, [23 January 1862], CW, 5:108.

Consults with Gen. Lane and Sen. Samuel C. Pomeroy (Kans.) regarding fugitive slaves and concludes that government cannot return them. N.Y. Tribune, 24 January 1862.

Nominates John Tucker of Pennsylvania and Peter H. Watson of Washington, DC, to be assistant secretaries of war. National Intelligencer, 25 January 1862.

Interviews Sen. Lazarus W. Powell (Ky.) regarding military assessments to provide for persons made homeless. Powell to Lincoln, 29 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

In the evening, President Lincoln and his wife, Mary, attend the Washington Theater to watch the New York Academy of Music perform selections from two Italian operas—Giuseppe Verdi's "Il Trovatore" and Vincenzo Bellini's "I Puritani." A newspaper reports, "The President and Mrs. Lincoln were present, and on his appearance in one of the private boxes he was greeted with hearty applause." Evening Star (Washington, DC), 23 January 1862, 2:5; 24 January 1862, 2:1.

Addresses memorandum to heads of departments and bureaus: "This man wants to work—so uncommon a want that I think it ought to be gratified. I shall be obliged by any Head of of [sic] a Bureau, or Department who can and will find work for him." Abraham Lincoln to Heads of Departments and Bureaus, 23 January 1862, CW, 5:109.



Browse Month

Lincoln authorizes Sec. Stanton to make desired changes in Bureau of Ordnance. Stanton to Lincoln, 24 January 1862, Elihu B. Washburne Papers, Library of Congress, Washington DC; Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, [24 January 1862], CW, 5:110.

Consults with E. Delafield Smith, U.S. district attorney in New York, who favors noninterference by President in case of Capt. Nathaniel Gordon, sentenced to be hanged for slave trading. Washington Star, 24 January 1862.

Submits to Senate correspondence in case of Spanish vessel "Providencia" seized by U.S. blockading squadron. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 24 January 1862, CW, 5:109-10.

Requests advice of Senate on loan to Mexico. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 24 January 1862, CW, 5:109.



Browse Month

William Schouler, adjutant general of Massachusetts, interviews President regarding raising of troops in Massachusetts by Gen. Butler. Butler, Correspondence, 1:324.

Sen. Browning (Ill.) spends hour with President during morning. Browning, Diary.

Subcommittee of Committee on Conduct of War interviews Lincoln on military administration of Gen. Fremont. Committee on Conduct of War, Report (1863), 1:79.



Browse Month

Irritated by slow production of mortars, Lincoln decides, in interview as reported by Asst. Sec. Fox, "to take these army matters into his own hands." Bruce, Tools of War, 169.

Consults with Sec. Stanton and E. M. Shield, construction engineer, regarding manufacture of mortar beds. Shield to Chase, 1 February 1862, Salmon P. Chase Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

In evening meets with several members of cabinet. Mrs. Lincoln not well enough to receive visitors. Journal, 27 January 1861, Samuel P. Heintzelman Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.



Browse Month

New Entry

Lincoln writes an endorsement on a letter from Henry A. Wise, of the U.S. Navy's Ordnance & Hydrography Bureau. Wise forwarded a request from Flag Officer Andrew H. Foote, who is stationed at Cairo, Illinois. Foote explained, "As the mortar Boats have no accommodations for cooking, keeping or carrying provisions, the men must have a steamer for their accommodation. Shall I purchase or hire a steamer for them?" Lincoln replies, "If Flag-officer Foote, can find a suitable Boat which he can purchase at a fair price, let him purchase it at once." Henry A. Wise to Abraham Lincoln, 26 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Abraham Lincoln to Henry A. Wise, 27 January 1862, IHi; CW, 5:112.



Browse Month

Revised Entry

Former Judge Gilbert Dean, counsel for Capt. Gordon, presents petition to President praying for life of client. Washington Star, 28 January 1862; Bates, Diary, 19 February 1862.

Lincoln submits to Senate treaty of extradition with Mexican Government. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate, 28 January 1862, CW, 5:113.

Gen. Banks, in town for congressional committee meeting, calls on President by invitation. Banks to Nicolay, 27 January 1862, Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

President interviews Dr. Bellows and G. T. Strong of U.S. Sanitary Commission, regarding appointments to medical bureau. George Templeton Strong, Diary, 4 vols., edited by Allen Nevins and Milton Halsey Thomas (New York: Macmillan, 1952).

In the evening, President Lincoln and his wife, Mary, host a reception at the White House. A newspaper reports, "Mr. Lincoln took his position in the Blue Room, and shook hands with those who passed him for two hours. At the expiration of this time he took the arm of Mrs. Senator [Zachariah] Chandler [of Michigan], and proceeded to the great East Room, and promenaded but a short time, and then withdrew from the scene. Mrs. Lincoln was never more elegantly attired, and of course was the centre of attraction." New York Herald, 29 January 1862, 5:2; Evening Star (Washington, DC), 29 January 1862, 3:2.



Browse Month

New Entry

Lincoln meets with Ellen Sherman, the wife of General William T. Sherman, and with her father Thomas Ewing, a former United States Senator from Ohio. Some in the press speculate that General Sherman is insane. Ellen Sherman acknowledges to Lincoln that her husband is "in low spirits and in poor health," but she writes to General Sherman that she asked the President "if he thought you insane when in command at Fort Corcoran. I told him you were no more so now. That I had known you since you were ten years old and you were the Same now that you had always been." Ellen Sherman believes that some of her husband's superiors, including Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas and former Secretary of War Simon Cameron, have not been supportive of Sherman. She writes him, "I told him you had enemies among your fellow Generals & that the newspaper correspondants were mere tools. . . . I told him that Adj. Genl. Thomas and Mr Cameron were inimical to you & that they had placed you in a false light to him." Ellen Sherman states that she wanted to meet with Lincoln "to say a word against those who had conspired against you &c & in vindication of your name." She notes that Lincoln "seemed very anxious that we should believe that he felt kindly towards you." She adds, "The President is very friendly to you." Ellen Ewing Sherman to William T. Sherman, 29 January 1862, William T. Sherman Family Papers, University of Notre Dame Archives, Notre Dame, IN.



Browse Month

President works all morning at War Dept. N.Y. Tribune, 31 January 1862.



Browse Month

President issues Special War Order No. 1. Army of Potomac formed into expedition to occupy "a point upon the Rail Road South Westward of what is known of Manassas Junction . . . to move before, or on, the 22nd. day of February next." President's Special War Order No. 1, 31 January 1862, CW, 5:115.

Sends additional documentation on "Trent" affair to Congress. Abraham Lincoln to the Senate and House of Representatives, 31 January 1862, CW, 5:115.

Directs that "Lane Expedition" against region west of Missouri and Kansas [Arkansas] be under supervision of Gen. McClellan and under command of Gen. Hunter. Abraham Lincoln to Edwin M. Stanton, 31 January 1862, CW, 5:115-16.

Approves act authorizing President of U.S. in certain cases to take possession of railroad and telegraph lines, and for other purposes. Stat. L., XII, 334.